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Visiting Artist: Rowland Ricketts

Fibre Fortnight is coming up next semester, approved so I thought I would share the work of Rowland Ricketts, our visiting artist this year.

Ricketts trained in Japan, learning how to farm and dye with indigo.  His work uses traditional techniques and natural processes to create woven and dyed works of art.  Ricketts also creates large installation pieces, working with the gallery space to create an environment for the viewer.

003_R_Ricketts_IAmAi-WarehouseInstallation

I am Ai, We are Ai – Warehouse Installation, Japan, 2012

Rickett’s artist statement begins beautifully with an explination of his process and feelings towards his materials.  He states, “The smell of an indigo vat just as it begins fermenting and springs to life is one of ripeness; a moment of rich potentiality when, as a maker, I momentarily stand between the history of the materials and processes that helped me get the indigo thus far and the promise of all the works that the vat is still yet to realize.”  

 010_R_Ricketts_PastPresent

Past Present, Ohio, 2010

005_R_Ricketts_AsIs

Red Aligned and Centered, Yellow

Rowland Ricketts will be showing his work at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Oregon from January 29, 2016 until June 04, 2016.  That means that if we go on our grad trip to Portland, a wide range of his work will be available for us to view.

All images were taken from Rickett’s website: http://www.rickettsindigo.com/

-Madison

 

Miniature Show funds visiting artists like Ruth Cuthand

 

 

Recently, herbal our Fibre department invited artist Ruth Cuthand to teach a beading workshop to the students of ACAD. Ruth Cuthand is a First Nations artist who uses her ancestors traditional beading methods as her medium. Ruth Cuthand’s Dis-ease series is currently on display at The Illingworth Kerr Gallery in Oh, Canada: Contemporary Art from North North America. In Dis-ease, the artist masterfully renders microscopic diseases;  diseases like small pox, syphilis and influenza were unknown to the indigenous people of Canada prior to colonialism.  Ruth Cuthand’s work addresses complex social and political issues affected by First Nations people.

Currently, I’m investigating experimental narratives through combined mixed media pieces. This piece was inspired by the stories (lies) we tell our children. The beading was extremely time consuming and after completing this project I can say I have a new appreciation for Ruth Cuthand’s beaded works! CAP(tain) Tooth will be auctioned off during our upcoming Miniature Show Auction (March 24 to April 9th). Last night to bid is April 9th!

 

CAP(tain) Tooth, 2015 By Karin McGinn

www.karinmcginn.com

2014 Miniature Show Silent Auction + Exhibition

Bronwyn Schuster is a young Canadian artist whose work spans several mediums. She primarily paints, troche and within the past year has been involved with an artist residency in Quebec, dentist and is attending The Swedish Academy of Realist Art. Her works touches upon several subjects, including self portraiture, and work that can be described as fantastical. She has created jewelry, art dolls, paintings large and small, commercial work, and is an avid member of several art scenes.

The Scarf- Self Portrait (Bronwyn Schuster, 2013)

(Question) How would you describe yourself as an artist?

(Answer) First question and you’ve already stumped me. I figure a lot of the artist I am is still trapped inside of me, as I lack some of the skills to express what it is that I imagine. I also don’t really know where me begins and artist ends. Mostly though, I am a tea drinking, generally happy, slightly ethereal, wannabe realist painter who uses surrealism far to much as a crutch when things go wrong.

The Swedish Academy of Realist Art                           Photo credit: Bronwyn Schuster

What is the school you are attending, and why did you choose to go there?

The Swedish Academy of Realist (aka SARA {aka Atelier Stockholm}) is a magical school that will pull at the heartstrings of any golden age nostalgist. SARA is built on the tradition of European fine arts ateliers where master painters would take on apprentices, teaching them techniques through a rigid academic approach to figure drawing and painting. Quite simply, we spend the days hunched over Charles Bargue lithographs, copying line for line and shade for shade is precise detail. This is broken up in the day with live model drawing, anatomy and materials lectures. After graduating from lithographs you move onto copying casts, then onto oil painting and still lifes. It’s a three year course, and 8 hour days. Possibly the most intensive immersion into fine arts you could find. Which is precisely why I chose to attend. There is something still striking and haunting about the oil paintings of old. They were true masters of their technique, and it’s not something you can learn at just any school. At SARA I know I am learning in relatively the same fashion that the masters did themselves, and I can even trace the lineage of my teachers (it goes back to Leonardo da Vinci!) I am a pure romanticist too. I really couldn’t imagine attending any other kind of school.

Inspired- Egon Schiele (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

What inspires or influences your different styles? For example, what inspired your Animal Magnetism series, and your self portrait series?

My inspirations are in a constant flux and change. At the moment I have noticed a strong influence from my fellow classmates, and at the same time the Swedish style of living. But, I find it difficult to explain my inspiration because I am such a visual person. You’ll just have to come over for tea so that I can show you. I can, however, explain how my self portrait series came about. One fine winter morning, out in the prairies of Saskatchewan, I found myself very frustrated with my particular art skill level and inability to paint portraits. This was the time before I had means to attend SARA, so I took it upon myself to research up artists I admired, delve into their life story and then try to replicate their style. I figured trying to mimic their techniques would teach me something, and choosing to paint myself gave me both 24/7 access to a live model (who I did not have to impress) and it insured that I wasn’t directly copying a painters art work. Thus my “Inspired By” self portrait series was born. I may have also had some influence by my photographer friend Susan Knight who had started a similar project in digital media. The animal people though? I can’t explain that. I have no clue where that came from …

Red Riding Hood (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Have you ever experienced artists’ block? What do you do to counter it?

Ah, artists block. I know you well. Artist block comes in many forms for me. There is technical artist block for starters. It’s when I’ve got the ideas, the subject, the materials and everything in front of me, and then I start working and EVERYTHING feels wrong. No matter what I do, I can’t replicate what I see in front of me or in my mind. It might be the most frustrating form of artists block for me. Usually it happens right on a huge learning curve, and you just have to power through it. But sometimes it’s good to take a break. Make something nice to drink and try again later. Generally I have to remember that it is not as bad as I think it is. Creative artists block usually happens due to lack of sleep. That’s when I rest and let the pressure go. If it lasts more than two days, then I’m just being lazy. Creativity is a muscle. You have to exercise it. Try new things. Write. Research, and have interesting conversations with people. Last of all artists blocks is procrastination. This one is sneaky. It comes in the form of “But I need to do this first!” Be that: make food, finish a chapter of a book, check facebook, do your taxes, organize something, go to the store, research something, watch a youtube video (who are you trying to kid). These are not important (okay, maaaybe food and taxes are) always put aside time for art and always use that time for art. As my friend Vincent always likes to say “What do we say to the god of unproductivity? … Not today!”

Artist block is not a valid excuse. Go make some art!

Inspired- Leonor Fini (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Bronwyn’s artwork et al can be found here: http://bronwynschuster.com/

 

-Emmelia Taylor

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, pharm
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 

The Reparative Impulse

 

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, tadalafil
but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

I found this and had to share it – especially for anyone else who is going through the “fourth year-final semester” angst. This kinda just says it all for me – and is a bit apropos for the readings that we are doing in Fibre 451, pilule
Grad class.

Hemorrhoids
Sept. 23, 2013″ src=”http://fibre.acadnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Sartre-Recipes-New-Yorker-470×422.jpeg” width=”470″ height=”422″ /> New Yorker Magazine, Sept. 23, 2013

 

Pick a pencil. Any pencil. Are you sure that is the right one? Maybe a pen.Or a brush. Grab some paper. What colour paper? Maybe you want a canvas. Or try organza. What colour warp? But are you sure you want to weave this? Take another look. What about mixed media for that. How do you know? etc.

lol. Christine

 

 

 

 
2014 MiniatureHello ACAD Community, read more

The annual Miniature Show Silent Auction and Exhibition is calling for submissions!

The Miniature Show will be exhibited as part of Fibre Fortnight March 10th-21st, cheap in the Main Mall. The silent auction will run until Thursday the 20th, physician
final bids at 6:30pm. All proceeds from the auction will be donated to Fibre Department for funding visiting artists and student enrichment.

Submitted artworks must be of 12”x12″x12″ or smaller, of any medium and subject matter. Artworks are accepted from all departments, students, faculty and alumni.

To submit work please email the title, medium, size, artist name, and a short description of any details by February 28th. All artwork can be delivered to the Fibre Department March 10th -14th.

Please email submissions to Natalie Lauchlan at natalie.lauchlan@acad.ca

Cheers,

The Fibre Department

Gary Markle receives exciting grant!

Throughout our history of musical instruments, and there have been a few theoretical ones (here’s looking at you, buy katzenklavier). This is one of the only ones to come to life.

About 500 years ago, Leonardo Da Vinci was sketching away as usual, being rather intelligent, and brilliant on paper. Da Vinci was a stunning artist, draftsman, and painter, but as a scientist… Goodness. For the past decade or so, it was become increasingly popular to take his sketches and drafts, and make them into a tactile, and usable machine. In most cases, these machines have been flying machines, trebuchets, et cetera. Most recently, it has been a musical instrument. The viola organista combines the piano and the cello. It looks like a baby grand piano, but the strings are played like the strings of a cello. The sound it creates is something curiously beautiful.

The viola organista was built and played by Slawomir Zubrzycki, a Polish concert pianist who happens to enjoy instrument-building. 

This instrument is a fascinating use of ideas that have been preserved for centuries. The result is a fantastical object, a collection of resonating strings and wheels. It sounds as if an entire string orchestra has somehow found itself to be quite comfortable within the confines of a piano.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sv3py3Ap8_Y#t=552

Gary Markle cuts fabric in the NSCAD classrooms. (Photo: Zeina Jreige and Kendra Lovegrove)

Gary Markle, pharm who visited the Fibre program last year, shop has just been awarded a $100, purchase
000 grant by the Canadian Institute of Health and Research funding.

Markle was given the $100,000 grant this October and has two years to create a product that may be commercialized by clothing manufacturers. He is an assistant professor in the textile and fashion department at Nova Scotia’s College of Art and Design.

Markle’s idea stems from having to take care of his mother who’s been living with dementia.

“I became really aware of what happens when you age,” he says. “And what happens to one’s sense of self around clothing and the choices that are available currently.”

His aim is to create clothing that allows those who are aging to still be able to have choices and comfort, while at the same time keeping a hold of their independence and dignity.

He says that as humans we react to colours and textures, and that these fashions are more than looking good, they’re about changing your mood and the way a person carries his or her self. READ MORE

Congratulations Gary!

(via unews.ca)

Yvonne Mullock visiting November 6

Yvonne Mulluck 2

Dont forget to sign up for a one-on-one crit with Yvonne!

Marimekko talk April 9

Gary Markle is visiting the department this week as part of Fibre Fortnight. Today he’s giving an all-day workshop about experiencing and experimenting with fabric and will give an artist-talk at 7pm in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre. Tonight’s reception marks the end of the silent auction which looks to already be breaking records for fundraising (money goes towards visiting artists, ambulance student projects and events).

20130321-154404.jpg
Workshop students branch out and some sort of claw pun that I cant think of (oh wait – “claw their way to the top”. Yes. Victory)

20130321-154421.jpg
Faculty member Barbara Sutherland shows that everyone wants to be just like Gary. Barbara, where are your glasses?! Classic rookie mistake.
ACAD Fibre Program is pleased to be co-sponsoring a talk by Shauna McCabe, information pills
curator of the exhibition Marimekko, With Love at the Textile Museum of Canada.

Join us at 2 pm in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre April 9, 2013 for this exciting lecture.

Visiting Artist Gary Markle

Gary Markle is visiting the department this week as part of Fibre Fortnight. Today he’s giving an all-day workshop about experiencing and experimenting with fabric and will give an artist-talk at 7pm in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre. Tonight’s reception marks the end of the silent auction which looks to already be breaking records for fundraising (money goes towards visiting artists, salve student projects and events).

20130321-154404.jpg
Workshop students branch out and some sort of claw pun that I cant think of (oh wait – “claw their way to the top”. Yes. Victory)

20130321-154421.jpg
Faculty member Barbara Sutherland shows that everyone wants to be just like Gary. Barbara, oncologist where are your glasses?! Classic rookie mistake.

20130321-163022.jpg
Group project! The students chose to do a weaving piece because they want to suck up to Mackenzie. (also because it looks rad)

20130321-163036.jpg
The other group choses to dress our technician, Tara Niscak, in haute couture Mad Max-style bridal accessories.

Visiting Artist Bean Gilsdorf

Flag for Parade Queens, health care 2011 | Polyester, glaucoma wool suiting, satin | 40.5 x 52.5 inches

If you were lucky enough to catch visitor Bean Gilsdorf’s artist talk yesterday, you were no doubt impressed by her candid and thoughtful presentation. For me it was interesting to hear about the development of her flag series and how she continues to redefine herself as an artist in relationship to her practice.

At the end of her talk, Bean showed us a couple of places on the web…

Here is a link to Bean’s Helpdesk posts on Daily Serving…

…and a link to Jacquard weaver/animator Kate Nartker’s site.

Visiting Artist | BEAN GILSDORF

For more information about Bean and her work, breast please visit www.beangilsdorf.com
We’d love to see you there!

Janice Jakielski

 

In case anyone was unaware of visiting Artist Janice Jakielski within our school I thought I’d spread the word!

            Conciliate/Aggravate, price 2010, porcelain, mixed media; 30″ h. x 18″ w. x 12″

American Artist Janice Jakielski planted her roots in ceramics receiving her B.F.A. at New York State College of Art and Design. She then set her sights on more mixed media forms for her M.F.A. at University of Colorado.

Janice is well traveled spending time in various US states, Japan, India and now ACAD. Janice describes a main concept of her work as,

“making objects for the body in order to transform the world and how we perceive the world. As mediated experience due to the rise of technology has prevailed I am interested in the function of the object against the growth of depersonalization. Objects Have the Ability to cultivate intimate relationships and provide self-awareness through encounter.” (http://janicejakielski.com)

Janice currently has a studio set up down in the Ceramics area, feel free to pay her a visit.

-Jessie Fraser

Talk by Ruth Scheuing TONIGHT!

Ruth Scheuing’s artist talk is scheduled for 630 pm in the ACAD Boardroom.

Of course this is not the only event tonight…be sure to come on down to the main mall for the closing reception of Fibre Fortnight, viagra 100mg the Miniature Show and Silent Auction and the ACAD Faculty exhibition opening. See you there!

Visiting Artist Kathryn Walter

Rabbit talking to elephant who appears to have no ees. Medieval illustration. Nice ears. Scan of 2 d image in the public domain believed to be free to use without restriction in the US.

This Wednesday at 10:00 am in Annex C, store the 2012 graduating class will be presenting their work PechaKucha style

The ACAD Fibre Program is excited to present a talk by artist and designer Kathryn Walter. Wednesday, order
October 12 at 230 pm in Annex C.

Kathryn Walter lives in Toronto and has maintained a studio practice since 1989, capsule
producing work that intersects visual art, material culture and the built environment. In 2000 she founded her company FELT, a laboratory through which she explores the material and history of modern industrial felt through exhibitions, research, architectural commissions and a product line.

She has created feature wall installations for residential and commercial buildings in Canada and the US working with architectural firms including Johnson Chou, Levitt Goodman, Diller Scofidio Renfro, and Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design. And, her work has been exhibited in private and pubic institutions including the Royal Ontario Museum and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum in New York.

Read and see more at www.feltstudio.com

Michael Brennand-Wood at ACAD

The ACAD Fibre Department is very excited to present world renowned visual artist Michael Brennand-Wood to kick-off our new scholastic year. There are two events associated with Michael’s visit:

Lecture “Pretty Deadly”
Monday, food September 12 at 5:30 pm in the in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre at ACAD
‘Pretty Deadly’ will focus on selected key themes mapping the development of Michael’s work, including exhibition, commission and public art projects. This lecture is FREE and open to the public – EVERYONE WELCOME. For more information on the lecture please feel free to contact Tara in the Fibre Department at 403.338.5584 or email tara.griffiths@acad.ca

Workshop “Random Precision
Tuesday, September 13, 9-4 pm at ACAD

Using a personal collection of materials with strong linear qualities, participants will develop an individual vocabulary of three-dimensional line. This provides the essential components of this challenging workshop to be used in an exploration of stitch, dept, translucency, illusion and structure.

This is a rare opportunity for individuals outside the ACAD degree program to work with an artist of this stature. Fibre artists, sculptors, mixed media artists and those interested in jumpstarting the creative process would enjoy working with Michael Brennand-Wood in this one day workshop.

‘Random Precision’ is open to the public through ACAD Extended Studies (contact 403.284.7640) The cost of the workshop is $159.00 plus GST.

For more information on Michael Brennand-Wood and his work, visit his website or read this interview on Ideas in the Making.

Fibre Fortnight Closing + Artist Talk TONIGHT

Laura Vickerson | Excess Baggage | 20 x 20 cm
Jane Kidd | Thaw | 30 x 15 cm

Miniatures by Laura Vickerson and Jane Kidd on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Closing bids tomorrow night at 830 pm following an artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga. Hope to see you there!

Lyn Pfleuger | Pull Here | dimensions variable

Lindsay Joy | Call Girl | 10 x 6 cm

Miniatures by Lyn Pfleuger and Lindsay Joy on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Join us tonight for a reception from 5 to 7 pm, tadalafil
artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga at 7 pm. Bids for silent auction items close at 830pm. Hope to see you there!

Lyn Pfleuger | Pull Here | dimensions variable

Lindsay Joy | Call Girl | 10 x 6 cm

Miniatures by Lyn Pfleuger and Lindsay Joy on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Join us tonight for a reception from 5 to 7 pm, clinic
artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga at 7 pm. Bids for silent auction items close at 830pm. Hope to see you there!

Lyn Pfleuger | Pull Here | dimensions variable

Lindsay Joy | Call Girl | 10 x 6 cm

Miniatures by Lyn Pfleuger and Lindsay Joy on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Join us tonight for a reception from 5 to 7 pm, sale
artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga at 7 pm. Bids for silent auction items close at 830pm. Hope to see you there!

Lyn Pfleuger | Pull Here | dimensions variable

Lindsay Joy | Call Girl | 10 x 6 cm

Miniatures by Lyn Pfleuger and Lindsay Joy on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Join us tonight for a reception from 5 to 7 pm, sovaldi sale artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga at 7 pm. Bids for silent auction items close at 830pm. Hope to see you there!

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Sculptural felt by Marjolein Dallinga

Please join us this evening from 5 to 9 pm in the ACAD Main Mall for the closing reception of Fibre Fortnight, pharmacy an exhibition of work by ACAD students. Felt artist Marjolein Dallinga will be giving an artist talk at 7pm followed by a call for closing bids on the Miniature Show Silent Auction featuring the work of ACAD Fibre Program students, faculty, alumni and friends.

Hope to see you there!

In Miniature | Lyn Pfleuger + Lindsay Joy

Laura Vickerson | Excess Baggage | 20 x 20 cm
Jane Kidd | Thaw | 30 x 15 cm

Miniatures by Laura Vickerson and Jane Kidd on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Closing bids tomorrow night at 830 pm following an artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga. Hope to see you there!

Lyn Pfleuger | Pull Here | dimensions variable

Lindsay Joy | Call Girl | 10 x 6 cm

Miniatures by Lyn Pfleuger and Lindsay Joy on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Join us tonight for a reception from 5 to 7 pm, tadalafil
artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga at 7 pm. Bids for silent auction items close at 830pm. Hope to see you there!

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