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How to make your own sewing mannequin!

Here’s an easy how to guide to make your very own sewing mannequin!

http://www.handimania.com/diy/your-own-shape-sewing-mannequin.html

Fibre Events

 

The annual Fibre show is on display in the main mall until Friday, adiposity February
10th.

Madelaine Purves-Smith presents Custom Woolen Mills Thursday Feb 16 – 3pm
Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre

The miniature show is in rm. 371 this year. Bidding has started and closes
during our reception, epilepsy Thursday February 16th, 5:30-8pm, final bids- 7:30pm.

Hope to see many of you at our talk and closing reception,
The Fibre Program

Review of “Anatomy for the Artist”

Anatomy for the Artist By Sarah Simblet walks developing artists through looking at anatomy with photos, bronchitis illustrated transparent overlays, and various Master works from Raphael to Holbein, Degas to Bacon, in tandem with models photographed by John Davis.

 

 

I found the book to be informative for base skeletal and muscle structures of both the full body and individual parts. The translucent illustrated overlays over Davis’ photography work are a helpful addition to seeing where skeletal structures are situated in the body and where they most affect form. The texts relating to drawing from anatomy studies have an encouraging tone,  She explains pitfalls and how to avoid falling into them and she gives tactics to develop good habits to help developing artists. She draws attention to small and easily missed anatomy quirks such as the dominant hand clavicle having more curve the the other. Simblet’s writing is clear and easy to follow.

The models used, especially noticeable with the male models, have extremely similar body types of the mesomorph/ectomorph* combination with similar muscle distribution. It would be more beneficial if there was a variety of endomorphic, ectomorphic, and mesomorphic* stand alone types and combinations. Additionally, it would also be beneficial to see how fat distribution and more than one type of muscle distribution affects form.

(Howard Schatz’s professional athlete line up is good example for body diversity)

yoooo check it!

The “MasterClass” sections at the end of each chapter speculates how each artist focused on would have used reference, showing the contemporary model posed in a similar manner to the human subjects of the paintings. Their inclusion encourages the viewer to study how each artist manipulates forms and provides context for the importance of studying the human form.

The overview of the history of anatomy studies at the beginning is intriguing; however, it feels out of place in a book that focuses on how to see and work with anatomy.  Since Simblet has included “MasterClass” sections, the information in these pages could have been used to expand upon the existing MasterClasses and create additional MasterClass studies; its inclusion feels a little tacked on.

I enjoyed Simblet’s artwork used in the latter part of the book, and I found her works provided a contemporary context of how to utilize anatomy studies in illustrations.

I had purchased this book with the intent of using it for anatomy reference. Though the text is useful , I found the models to be too similar and often found myself searching google images rather than actually utilizing the photographs. It’s a really pretty book and a great tool for artist just starting out.

 

*Meso, endo, ecto is more of a descriptor and very loose category system rather than actual science

tldr: pros: MasterClass and text, cons: lack of body diversity and history that could be more MasterClasses instead

Works Cited

Schatz, Howard. Athlete. New York: HarperCollins, 2002. Print.

Simblet, Sarah, and John Davis. Anatomy for the Artist. New York: DK Pub., 2001. Print.


~Sara Y

A Little Motivation

 

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Source: “The Great Discontent Issue 4.” https://shop.thegreatdiscontent.com/products/the-great-discontent-issue-four. Web. Sept 5, glaucoma 2016.

This week I would like to share with you one of my favourite magazines… The Great Discontent.  

The Great Discontent (TGD) is a print and online magazine featuring inspiring, infertility in-depth conversations with today’s artists, health makers, and risk takers. TDG looks into the lives of its subjects through long-form interviews and short features, a podcast, a live event series and film-based projects. This magazine is published by Wayward Wild in New York City.

Print issues are available for purchase in TGD’s online shop and at retailers worldwide. In addition to print, they also publish new digital content on their website throughout the month. You can also purchase digital copies of all their magazines. I purchased their first magazine digitally a few years ago. Accessing the magazine on my computer and phone is a simple and enjoyable experience. I love googling the artists and viewing their websites while I read through the magazine.

Here’s a summary of what their printed issues cover:

Issue # 1

This issue features a collection of inspiring interviews loosely based around the theme of leaps. Their stories encourage, inspire, and challenge us to make the jump, even if—and especially when—we’re afraid.


Issue # 2

The theme of hustle implores us to reconsider the idea of making it—both how we do it and how we define it. This magazine is a reminder that more often than not, we must work hard to carve out a path to doing the work we love.

Issue # 3

Features those who have dared to push the boundaries of what is achievable.  Their stories will encourage you to explore your interests and overcome your fears, allowing you to discover what you’re truly capable of.

Issue # 4

Ambition is the theme of this issue, covering a selection of interviews with those who are committed to their crafts and pursuing their paths with a sense of purpose. Their stories will drive you to explore your ambitions and chase them with a renewed resolve.

Reading these interviews is a treat, and they help inform your practice at the same time. You can’t go wrong with TGD, it’s well worth your time. It is a great resource for any creative in any stage of their career.

I hope you enjoy reading TGD as much as I do.


-Caroline-

samantha-pleet-portrait-hannah-metz-hero

Source: “Samantha Pleet.” https://thegreatdiscontent.com/interview/samantha-pleet. Interview by Ryan and Tina Essmaker. Photograph by Hannah Kristina Metz. Web. March 24, 2015. 



Getting Yourself Organized!

It’s that time of year again, drugs when students need to start planning their future while we tackle all the course work that’s coming our way. Career goals, viagra buy planning, website organization, writing, marketing, making awesome work, preparing portfolios… the list goes on. School becomes quite overwhelming pretty quickly. That’s why today I am dedicating my post to super sweet resources that can get anyone back on track from their summer vacation!

stressed-pupper-2
Source: “Kreg looks like he’s starting to regret those 4 years.” Imgur. https://imgur.com/Fp9qol8.  Web, April 24, 2016.

FOR PERSONAL ORGANIZATION

EVERNOTE : A personal content manager. Keep lists of websites you like, recipes, ANYTHING that you want to keep track of. Accessible from anywhere, Shareable with other evernote users (good for group work).

Google Drive : Cloud Storage, integrated into gmail. Most useful for gmail users, but is accessible with any google account. Best for personal storage only, sharing capability isn’t great, doesn’t create links for file downloading purposes.

Google Calendar : Scheduling app. Works best integrated into gmail. Make different ‘calendars’ for different uses, easy to share calendars with others, send/make appointments automatically through email. This is my savior this year!

Toggl : Time tracker. Really great for knowing where your work day went, or how long you’ve spent on a job. Very simple, can generate time sheets too.

FOR GROUP WORK

Google Hangouts : Group video chat. Best video conference tool for more than 2 users at a time. Can share your screen with other callers, and text links during calls. Needs gmail account.

Skype : Two person video chat. Commonly used worldwide, has recording capability with plugin software such as, CallRecorder

DropBox : Cloud Storage, made very useful for projects and file sharing. Free account with free space that grows with recommendations. Excellent for file sharing and making downloadable files. Integrated onto your desktop. (Good for group work)

GoToMeeting : Paid group chat provider. More reliable for important, professional meetings.

FOR BUSINESS

Mailchimp : Free (up to 1000 contacts) contact list manager and email creation software. Keep your mailing list up to date and in order. Track who opens emails, categorize contacts, generates a ‘sign up’ form you can embed on your website. Starting a mailing list is great for when you start to build clientele at craft shows.

The Square (POS) : Extremely easy point of sale device. Connects to your bank account, allows small vendors to accept credit cards. Low % commission on per sale basis. No contract. Vital for craft shows!

Dreamhost : Web­hosting. Affordable and easy to manage, good user interface, great customer service and friendly. Can register all kinds of domains too.

Big Cartel : E­commerce platform, great for small shops.  – up to 3 item shops are hosted Free. Uses paypal. – Can be cloaked on your personal website.

Shopify : Canadian E­commerce platform, good plans available for larger shops with many items or lots of sales. – Can be cloaked on your personal website.

Wave : Canadian online Accounting software. Free for small business, can connect to your bank account. Does invoicing, tracks expenses and bill payments.

Quickbooks Online : Highly tested and true accounting software. Online tool is new, I have heard only good things about this platform. Makes sending invoices easy and professionally to your clients.

Tangerine : Online banking, personal or business. No fee banking, great user interface, interest on savings, picture check deposits, easily shared/linked accounts – I hesitate to recommend a bank, but this one deserves a look.

FOR PUBLISHING

Issuu : Web publishing into digital flipbooks. Free. Used by magazines for professional online published look. Upload a PDF and the site crunches it into a online flipbook with a link.

Blurb : Affordable, high quality, hardcopy book publishing. Can order 1 or more books – best to be designed in InDesign, but can be published from a PDF. Site will generate a flipbook of you book with link – printing proof. Delivery in a few weeks.

Graph Paper Press : Wordpress themes for creatives, free and paid. Great quality and design, come with updates, lots of functionality.

Moo Cards : Very high quality printing. Offers low unit print runs, can be expensive but you don’t end up with 1000s of cards (which is often a waste). Lots of customization.

Vista Print :  Affordable large run printing. Canadian (lower shipping cost). Mid range quality. Limited customization.

Overnight Prints.com : Good quality printing, fast turnaround. Shipping from California, can be pricey. Moderate customization.

Adfactor : Toronto printing company. Can order online or in person. Turnaround time is a couple weeks, can be convenient. Limited customization, average prices. FOR SOCIAL NETWORKING

FOR SOCIAL NETWORKS 

Etsy : Sales platform. Connected directly to customers. Is known for craft, batch production, hand made goods by real people. Very quick to sign up and begin sales pursuit.

Linked in : Business driven social media. Linked In profiles are very often used as resumes and in job acquisition. Ability to ‘endorse’ contacts for their skill set. Good for finding references.

Hootsuite : Social Networking Manager. Put in time all at once and Hootsuite posts and updates your social platforms for you – as per your programmed schedule. Great for keeping networking sites

I love getting organized and staying on top of things! If you have a useful site, platform or source that you’d like to share, comment below! We’re all in this together. Lets make this year a great one!

painting-pupper
Source: “We don’t make mistakes, just happy little accidents.” Imgur. https://imgur.com/su9hjm4.  Web, August 29, 2016.

-Caroline-

Fibre Arts Book Sale!

Over reading break in my hometown I decided to try and teach people how to knit.

I hosted a Wool and the Gang knitting party where they set up the event and sell the wool but I teach the class.

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IMG_3295

It was very successful 13 people signed up and everyone finished there Snood Operator which was the name of the project.

 

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The knitting projects are super fun and for all levels of knitting and the best part is that you get your project for half the price and the host gets one for free!

Knit Parties

 

-Nicole
Luke Lindoe Library’s

Fibre Arts Book Sale

book_nerd1

February 25-27th

In conjunction with

‘Fibre Fortnight’ (https://acad.ca/fibre-fortnight-2016)

and

‘925: A Sterling Anniversary’ (https://acad.ca/925-A-Sterling-Anniversary)

Featuring the generous donation from the estate of SANDRA KRYSTALOWICH, health
award-winning Calgary quilter, physician
this sale will include

a treasure-trove of New and ‘As New’ books on all forms of Quilting, Embroidery and all aspects of the needle arts.

Thursday February 25th

ACAD Main Mall 12-5:30pm

Friday February 26th

Library 8:30am – 4:30pm

Saturday February 27th

Library 11am-5pm

CASH ONLY please (ATMs on campus)

 

Now accepting applications: 2016 Contextural Self-Directed Summer Residency Program – Deadline March 27

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Friends and arts supporters, info

We are currently accepting applications to be part of this dynamic and vital part of Calgary’s cultural scene as participants in a self-directed summer residency and end of residency exhibition. Residency participants will have the option to work with the group to develop a community of fibre artists through workshops, treat critique sessions and exhibitions throughout the year.
We are seeking individuals who:

  • Are interested in working within a co-operative studio setting
  • Will be actively involved in, caries and contribute to, our community
  • Seek access to affordable studio space and specialized equipment
  • Are interested in sharing their knowledge and skills through teaching and collaboration
  • Appreciate and practice the diversity of textile arts and craft
  • Embrace an environmental approach to studio production
  • Are ready to commit a fee of $250 for a three-month, or $150 for one-month summer studio rental and access to equipment.
  • Will contribute to the end of summer residency exhibition.

Please visit – Contextural.ca for more information on our mission, vision, and values.

Residency Dates

One-month residencies are May 29 – July 3 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm) and July 24 – 

August 28 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in on Sunday, July 24 at 1:00pm).

Three-month residency is May 29 – August 28 with mandatory attendance for orientation/move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm.

How To Apply – Please review the attached submission information package or visit contextural.ca/residency-application. Current Contextural members are only required to submit a statement of intent unless you would like to be considered for the scholarship. See the scholarship section below for details.

Deadline for submissions is Sunday, March 27th @ midnightIf accepted, residency fees are due with the acceptance form and supply order form by May 1st.

Again this year, Contextural will be offering the Contextural Summer Residency Scholarship to individuals or members applying for the three-month residency. The scholarship includes studio fees for the three-month summer residency ($250 value) and $250 for supplies.

For questions regarding the Contextural Summer Residency, please direct them to us at residency@contextural.ca

 

 

Why get rid of it when you can mend it?

Here are some easy and beautiful ways to bring that special piece of clothing back to life!

japanese-boro-6860

WHERE NEXT?: Creative Writing, Narrative, Film and Contemporary Art

February 12-13, gonorrhea 2016:
https://www.acad.ca/where-next-creative-writing-narrative-film-and-contemporary-art
https://derekbeaulieu.wordpress.com/2015/12/24/where-next-creative-writing-narrative-film-and-contemporary-art/

A two day symposium discussing writing and text-art in a trans-media
environment. Featuring discussions and performances by nationally and
internationally renowned speakers on the role of creative writing, narrative
and story-telling in visual and digital art & craft, performance,
screen-writing and pedagogy.

“Where Next?” features nationally and internationally-recognized artists,
Calgarian teachers and practitioners, ACAD staff and students – all focused
on creative writing and radical pedagogy. Join us for two days of
cutting-edge conversation and performance on the role of creative writing
within an arts discourse and how writing overlaps teaching and learning.

1-15-2016 - WHERE NEXT- Poster FINAL SH

 
Co-ordinated by Calgary’s 2014-2016 Poet Laureate, and ACAD Instructor,
Derek Beaulieu.

**Tickets for this 2-day symposium are only $80 ($50 with student discount) and
include all lectures and meals**

Tickets are available here:
http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2471324
(student discount available by entering the code ACADCreativeWriter)

Keynote Presentations
Jason Edward Lewis (Montreal, QC): Concordia University Research Chair in
Computational Media and the Indigenous Future Imaginary. Co-founder of the
Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace research network and the Skins
Workshops on Aboriginal storytelling and video game design.

Francesca Capone (Portland, OR, USA) is a visual artist who works with
interdisciplinary practices. She is currently exhibiting at LUMA/Westbau,
The Last Brucennial, The Gelman Gallery at the RISD Museum, Publication
Studio Hudson and The Granoff Center at Brown University. She is the author
of Weaving Language: Writing in Threads.

Liz Worth (Toronto, ON): Worth?s first book was the first in-depth account
of the history of Toronto?s punk music scene entitled Treat Me Like Dirt: An
Oral History of Punk in Toronto and Beyond, which created a renewed interest
in preserving the history of Canadian punk. Her most recent collection is No
Work Happens Here, a poetic response to Andy Warhol?s novel a: a novel. As a
performance artist, Worth is performs solo and as one-half of Salt Circle, a
Toronto-based duo that combines spoken word, noise, and ritual and
performance elements.

Performance
Tamara Himmelspach

Panelists
Ashok Mathur
Nick Sousanis
Cheryl Foggo
Larissa Lai
Devyani Saltzman
Natali Rodrigues
Silas Kaufman
Christian Bok
Riley Rossmo
Joe Hospodarec
Victoria Braun
Natalie Lauchlan
Jen Mizuik
Wendy Hill-Tout
Heather Huston
Alex Link
Sarah Grodecki
Naoko Masuda
Andrew Wreggitt

For more information, contact:
derek beaulieu
derek@housepress.ca
www.derekbeaulieu.wordpress.com

Production sewing class coming this February!

static1.squarespace.com

ACAD Alumni Bree Zorel and her partner Juan Jose have started Tenderfield: adventures in handmade, remedy
ethical textiles sourced from Chile and/ or made in Canada.

Tenderfield celebrates considerate design and slow cloth – textiles that are handmade, recycled, all-natural, fair trade, and made with purpose. We believe in supporting textile knowledge and technologies, skill sharing, and cloth as a community building activity. We teach classes and provide thoughtfully made goods for those who appreciate the delights of slowly and considerately made textiles.

DSC_0122

Tenderfield fibres, whether yarns or recycled fabrics, are chosen for their pure natural fibre content whenever possible. Natural fibres include alpaca, lambswool, cashmere, merino, linen, leather, silk, and cotton. Whether hailing from flora or fauna, we believe that the pleasure of natural fibres next to our skin and in our homes is the squishiest, softest, and loveliest thing we could ask.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield is helping support the continuation of hand made textile traditions through the practice, economic support, and transmission of knowledge of knitting, quilting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, shoemaking, mending, and other traditional fibre techniques. Artisans are all paid a fair wage for their creations, whether articles are made in Canada or in South America. 
ACAD Alumni Bree Zorel and her partner Juan Jose have started Tenderfield: adventures in handmade, Mycoplasmosis
ethical textiles sourced from Chile and/ or made in Canada.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield celebrates considerate design and slow cloth – textiles that are handmade, recycled, all-natural, fair trade, and made with purpose. We believe in supporting textile knowledge and technologies, skill sharing, and cloth as a community building activity. We teach classes and provide thoughtfully made goods for those who appreciate the delights of slowly and considerately made textiles.

DSC_0122

Tenderfield fibres, whether yarns or recycled fabrics, are chosen for their pure natural fibre content whenever possible. Natural fibres include alpaca, lambswool, cashmere, merino, linen, leather, silk, and cotton. Whether hailing from flora or fauna, we believe that the pleasure of natural fibres next to our skin and in our homes is the squishiest, softest, and loveliest thing we could ask.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield is helping support the continuation of hand made textile traditions through the practice, economic support, and transmission of knowledge of knitting, quilting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, shoemaking, mending, and other traditional fibre techniques. Artisans are all paid a fair wage for their creations, whether articles are made in Canada or in South America. 

static1.squarespace.com

ACAD Alumni Bree Zorel and her partner Juan Jose have started Tenderfield: adventures in handmade, ask
ethical textiles sourced from Chile and/ or made in Canada.

Tenderfield celebrates considerate design and slow cloth – textiles that are handmade, viagra recycled, this
all-natural, fair trade, and made with purpose. We believe in supporting textile knowledge and technologies, skill sharing, and cloth as a community building activity. We teach classes and provide thoughtfully made goods for those who appreciate the delights of slowly and considerately made textiles.

DSC_0122

Tenderfield fibres, whether yarns or recycled fabrics, are chosen for their pure natural fibre content whenever possible. Natural fibres include alpaca, lambswool, cashmere, merino, linen, leather, silk, and cotton. Whether hailing from flora or fauna, we believe that the pleasure of natural fibres next to our skin and in our homes is the squishiest, softest, and loveliest thing we could ask.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield is helping support the continuation of hand made textile traditions through the practice, economic support, and transmission of knowledge of knitting, quilting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, shoemaking, mending, and other traditional fibre techniques. Artisans are all paid a fair wage for their creations, whether articles are made in Canada or in South America. 
The Sewing Production Class is a 4 hour intensive masterclass where students will come out with 5 quality sewn products ready to sell. If you want to improve your sewing, purchase get faster and make something to sell at show and sell, urticaria
this is for you. You can sign-up for more information and a checklist to get ready for selling at a craft sale at http://eepurl.com/bLjezT <https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Feepurl.com%2FbLjezT&h=jAQH6QUHP>

production-sewing-class-poster

Tenderfield

Much like Tessa Farmer work, see the artist Kate Clark utilizes taxidermy in her practice. I feel a great connection with Kate Clarks work as she focuses on the subject of anthropomorphism quite literally. I think it is within human nature to draw connections between ourselves and others that are not human, website whether that be a plant, information pills an animal or simply an inanimate object, in order to create a greater understanding between Human and other. I think out of these animals are most easily anthropomorphized. We can see this in fairy tales as these short stories which often contain animals with both animal and human characteristics playing on our own assumption that animals have human characteristics and humans have animal characteristics. With Kate Clarks work I believe that is speaks well to the idea of literally living in someone else’s skin to find a relation that wasn’t there before. I found this video of her talking about her practice and found it interesting to learn that she also works with sculpey in her practice, as this is a material I have been using in order to sculpt the faces hands and feet on my Chimera creatures.

Take a look at this video and I hope you enjoy!!

-Amy

static1.squarespace.com

ACAD Alumni Bree Zorel and her partner Juan Jose have started Tenderfield: adventures in handmade, anaemia
ethical textiles sourced from Chile and/ or made in Canada.

Tenderfield celebrates considerate design and slow cloth – textiles that are handmade, recycled, all-natural, fair trade, and made with purpose. We believe in supporting textile knowledge and technologies, skill sharing, and cloth as a community building activity. We teach classes and provide thoughtfully made goods for those who appreciate the delights of slowly and considerately made textiles.

DSC_0122

Tenderfield fibres, whether yarns or recycled fabrics, are chosen for their pure natural fibre content whenever possible. Natural fibres include alpaca, lambswool, cashmere, merino, linen, leather, silk, and cotton. Whether hailing from flora or fauna, we believe that the pleasure of natural fibres next to our skin and in our homes is the squishiest, softest, and loveliest thing we could ask.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield is helping support the continuation of hand made textile traditions through the practice, economic support, and transmission of knowledge of knitting, quilting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, shoemaking, mending, and other traditional fibre techniques. Artisans are all paid a fair wage for their creations, whether articles are made in Canada or in South America. 

In Conversation: Paul Hardy, Susan Nance and Janice Wright Cheney

The only other studio class I am taking this semester is a Linocut print class with Heather Huston (PRNT 211), approved so I was wanting to somehow connect that with the only fibre class I was taking! As most of you know, one health I’ve been focusing on crystal and fossil imagery in my fibre work so obviously that is what I included in my prints.

For the first project, surgery I used the ammonite fossil as my main image:

ammonite print 1

photo by Madison Appleton

The first assignment was a simple black image and was used to become familiar with the technique.

 

crystal print

photo by Madison Appleton

crystal print detail

detail shot by Madison Appleton

As the class went on we were taught how to experiment more with colour and different techniques and layers. This was exciting for me because I love to play with colour in my fibre work! For my second project I chose to go with the crystal image. I was wanting to create a sense of heaviness on the bottom of the image – a weight or force.

 

 

 

 

 

photo by Madison Appleton

photo by Madison Appleton

For the last project we were given free reign, so I decided to stick with my crystals but combine them with fibre. I created a crystal print for crystal pouches – something to keep your precious crystals and gems safe! I used the materials and colours that I did because I wanted to give off a comfy and warm feeling, a cozy feeling. I had an interesting discovery while making these – prints by definition are made almost in a production line which I was not enjoying when I started down that path for the grad class…but I really enjoyed the process in making these pouches! What was the difference? Maybe it was the technique? I still don’t know but I am excited to grow some more and find out.

~Madde~

Tuesday, case
December 8

7pm
Members $10/General $12

Artist Janice Wright Cheney and animal humanities professor Susan Nance join Glenbow artist-in-residence Paul Hardy to discuss the relationship between humans and animals in design and culture. Moderated by Melanie Kjorlien.

JWC-StandingBear2012-14

Solar Dyeing

In an effort to condense my ideas and make them applicable to my practice, rehabilitation
I have began to narrow in on suspension as a way to affect a public space or gallery space. From the beginning of this exploration I was interested in tension of materials; although a suspended piece can never actually float in space, unhealthy therefore removing some obvious tension, medical the placement and angle can have an effect on how it is viewed and how the materials have a conversation with one another.

I feel excited about this path, and also feel resolved in having a more succinct idea. However, I will continue to see how the process of making affects they way I speak to the work.

Suspended Stone Circle III have started looking at a couple textile artists who beautifully utilize suspension. One that stood out to me in particular was Ken Unsworth. He is an Australian sculptural and installation artist. The work that caught my eye was a series of suspended rocks, held by a massive amount of thread. He is interested in creating sculptures that play on memory. The experience happens either in person with the memory that is taken away from seeing the work, or through a rumour of a memory. This gives the work an ephemerality that I admire.Suspended Stone Circle II, detail

The tension created in this work is exactly what I love: an ode to the soft being strong.

-Marcia

Source:

 

 
In an effort to condense my ideas and make them applicable to my practice, geriatrician
I have began to narrow in on suspension as a way to affect a public space or gallery space. From the beginning of this exploration I was interested in tension of materials; although a suspended piece can never actually float in space, prescription therefore removing some obvious tension, the placement and angle can have an effect on how it is viewed and how the materials have a conversation with one another.

I feel excited about this path, and also feel resolved in having a more succinct idea. However, I will continue to see how the process of making affects they way I speak to the work.

Suspended Stone Circle II

I have started looking at a couple textile artists who beautifully utilize suspension. One that stood out to me in particular was Ken Unsworth. He is an Australian sculptural and installation artist. The work that caught my eye was a series of suspended rocks, held by a massive amount of thread. He is interested in creating sculptures that play on memory. The experience happens either in person with the memory that is taken away from seeing the work, or through a rumour of a memory. This gives the work an ephemerality that I admire.Suspended Stone Circle II, detail

The tension created in this work is exactly what I love: an ode to the soft being strong.

-Marcia

 

Work Cited:

“Suspended Stone Circle II, (1974-1977, 1988) by Ken Unsworth.” Art Gallery NSW. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2015.
With my Jacquard weaving up on the Poly & Esther Gallery wall, treat I thought it would be a good time to post about the work I have been doing in my other fourth year directed studio.

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2015.” width=”280″ height=”209″ /> Marcia Fisher. Mindscaping, 2015.

I love the possibility of working with imagery in Jacquard weaving. However, I am focused on making this imagery as reliant on light and shadow as I am with my sculptural pieces. I am very interested in the story that can be read into broken imagery. I chose the broken twill weave structure because of the way it causes the image to break down the closer you get to it. In this work, I am speaking to spaces of the mind. I believe the ability for the work to appear clear the further away you are adds depth to the concept of the work.

Marcia Fisher. Mindscaping Detail, 2015.

Marcia Fisher. Mindscaping Detail, 2015.

I have not taken the time to specifically explore topics of the mind in my practice before, but it is something that I have always found interest in. I am very happy with how this investigation and the resulting work turned out.

Marcia Fisher. Mindscaping Detail, 2015.

Marcia Fisher. Mindscaping Detail, 2015.

I am also very lucky that the Jacquard loom worked almost flawlessly for me this semester. This is nearly unheard of and made for one very happy weaver!

-Marcia
The Fibre 2-D class is learning about solar dyeing with natural dyes. Students have access to our commercial natural dyes as well they were asked to source some of their own materials such as pomegranate seeds and skins, sick
onion skins, coffee and teas. The studios are alive with colour!

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La triennale internationale des arts textiles en Outaouais

A fast approaching call for submissions!

http://www.triennale-outaouais.com/english.html

Tessa Farmer and Taxidermy

Midterm is tomorrow. I feel almost ready. I ran out of elastic for my skirts, physician but I am sure I can improvise a way to display them on the mannequins. Wigs and costumes are scattered everywhere. I have lot of fabric so I think I am going to pick out back drops. I found models, but I wont be using live models until the final critique. Foot wear is always mentioned so I was thinking of using my makeup skills to build their feet into the fabric backdrop, I will entertain this idea. The costumes are mostly done but I feel I can add more. I always and will always feel like I can add more. Its an OCD, and in my mind there never really is ‘too much’.

However, I dont feel as confident with gathering up my ideas about my pieces and my work for my essay. I literally just do things because I like it. I like fashion and costuming and I like putting colors together. Maybe during the critique things will be said that will push me in the right direction. After midterm I need to pick a day to spend in the library to do more research.

  • Chelsey Wensveen

Through the making of creatures familiar and yet unknown I sought to find other artists that harnessed ideas of the unreal living in the world of the real. I happened upon an article from The Journal of Modern Craft called A Parasitic Craft: Taxidermy in the Art of Tessa Farmer. To me taxidermy holds a special place in the world of real life fantasy, pill
as it is ever trying to convince its audience that the subject matter before them is in fact alive, pills giving way to false moister on the nose and eyes, information pills
dynamic poses and providing substance where only a hide remains.

essa Farmer, Little Savages, 2007. Taxidermied fox, wasp nest, bones, insects, animals, plant roots, commission of the Natural History Museum, London, in collaboration with Danielle Arnaud, Parabola. © Tessa Farmer, London. Photo credit: Sean Daniels.

Tessa Farmer, Little Savages, 2007. Taxidermied fox, wasp nest, bones, insects, animals, plant roots, commission of the Natural History Museum, London, in collaboration with Danielle Arnaud, Parabola. © Tessa Farmer, London. Photo credit: Sean Daniels.

To me the work of Tessa Farmer is so interesting because she creates intricate worlds presumably unnoticed to our eyes but within our reality. Taking ownership of taxidermy not to uphold its tradition of preservation in everlasting life but picking it apart create something new while still holding true to the nitty gritty of nature, parasitism and decay included.

Here is a video of Tess Famer talking about her work Little Savages and the Natural History Museum.

Link to the Article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.2752/174967714X14111311182802
It can also be found in the Acad School Library in The Journal of Modern Craft
-Amy

Work Cited:
Lange-Berndt, Petra. “A Parasitic Craft: Taxidermy in the Art of Tessa Farmer.” The Journal of Modern Craft 7.3 (2014): 267–284. Taylor and Francis+NEJM. Web.

 

 

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