Fibre Events

 

The annual Fibre show is on display in the main mall until Friday, adiposity February
10th.

Madelaine Purves-Smith presents Custom Woolen Mills Thursday Feb 16 – 3pm
Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre

The miniature show is in rm. 371 this year. Bidding has started and closes
during our reception, epilepsy Thursday February 16th, 5:30-8pm, final bids- 7:30pm.

Hope to see many of you at our talk and closing reception,
The Fibre Program

Seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

2017 Mini poster

The ACAD Fibre program is seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

Funds raised support visiting artists, troche workshops and student-initiated projects in the Fibre program. Students, pilule alumni, ed faculty and friends are encouraged to donate work for the show.

Works restricted to 12” in any direction in all mediums will be accepted.

All work must be accompanied by a submission form and dropped off at the Fibre Program office, Rm 414 by Monday, January 30th, 2017.

The Miniature Show will be displayed from February 6 – 16th. The closing event will be held Thursday, February 16th from 5.30 – 8 pm in Room 371 with closing bids in at 7.30 pm.

For more information or a submission form contact kellie.reid@acad.ca or asma.ismail@acad.ca

 

The Art of Stillness

 

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In conversation with Pico Iyer and Laurie Brown on Stillness at the Banff Centre Photo Source: personal.

 

This past weekend I was very fortunate to be able to attend a conversation with writer Pico Iyer and CBC broadcaster Laurie Brown (from The Signal) as they discussed Stillness at The Banff Centre. Pico Iyer (of TED talk fame) has long been an inspiration to me for my written material and content behind my embroideries.

Several years back while working through concepts of home within my work I came across Iyer’s TED Talk called “Where Is Home?” his perspective shook me out of a writer’s rut and helped me work through my own definitions of home. I have since been following his publications closely.

When I later came across his second TED Talk, information pills “The Art of Stillness”. I discovered how we aligned for a second time as I was starting to work through my embroideries on movement. When Iyer’s book of the same title was released I was quick to pick it up, view hunkered down with a pizza and read it from beginning to end.

 

Processed with Snapseed.
Photo Source: personal.

The biggest takeaway that I had from my experience at The Banff Centre and Iyer’s talk was the importance of slowing down in our fast paced digital world. I often look to an embroidery as a source for my personal removal and overstimulation from technology. Embroidery cannot be sped up, stomach no amount of technology will make those handstitches go in any faster without losing their precise nature. I find myself working on my embroideries losing a sense of time and my surroundings and coming to my own definition of stillness.

If you’re interested in hearing more about the talk, comment below!

 

julie.

The Never Ending Process

Weaving, dosage dyeing, ambulance weaving, medications dyeing, weaving, weaving, weaving, dyeing…is all my my past semester seemed to consist of (not that I’m complaining… I loved it!).

I have been working on different types of weaving with different fibres and different dyeing processes. Here are some results you may have already seen:

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One thing I had never tried was dyeing my own skein of yarn, which led me to my next project…

I had a skein of plain white wool which I dyed using 4 different colours of fibre reactive dyes in squirt bottles. I laid out the skein, applied my dye, and let it sit overnight wrapped up in plastic. When I went to wash out the dye the next morning, all of the colours seemed to have bled into each other, creating a VERY subtle colour. Although it wasn’t what I was expecting the colour to turn out like, I was quite happy with the end product. Here are some progress shots of the wool once it was dyed and then turned into a woven scarf:

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Trying out this new process was really fun for me and I think I will definitely use it again and try it with a different material.

~Madde~

 

The Mysterious Weaver: Helena Vento

While working on my transparent cotton weavings, public health I began to research artists who work in a similar way. This search was too specific in nature, and I had a difficult time uncovering artists working with the same concepts and processes as me. However, I did find Helena Vento. When searched, her name brought results of only her Pinterest page, where little information was given as to her work as an artist or how these pieces evolved.

The images included a caption simply stating that they are a transparent weave of linen. Despite the lack of further information, I was inspired by the subtle design of the weavings, the finishing of the edges, and the documentation in everyday spaces. These are the decisions that are most critical in making a weaving successful, and I feel that her weavings are presented very successfully.

                     

This work gave me something to think about as I continue to document my own weavings and strive to present them as successfully as possible.

-Marcia

Image Source/Helena’s Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/helenavento/textiles-by-helena-vento/

Back to Basics

In a reaction to the loss of a loved one, this web I decided to switch gears within my practice and focus on creating a work that allowed myself to work through the grief. This work took shape in the form of two weavings which are roughly 2′ x 6′. The weaving process is repetitive and therefore conducive to reflection. I feel this direction provided an outlet for my grieving process, hospital while also providing new insights for my practice.

Weaving, In Progress
Weaving, In Progress

After reflecting on the process, I see that this was an important step towards facing what I did not want to; in the weeks between losing my grandmother and beginning the weaving process, I inadvertently kept myself busy with activities which would not bring up thoughts of the loss. Starting and following through with the weaving put a personal pressure on dealing with every aspect of my loss.

Weaving, In Progress
Weaving, In Progress

The scale of these woven pieces is meant to reflect a figure. I chose to keep everything concerning the weaving minimal, including the weaving structure and colour palette. I did not want any distraction from the conceptual meaning of the pieces. I chose to weave openly so there would be a high level of transparency in the cloth. These pieces stand for what is gone, but not lost. It is an attempt to put to materiality what cannot be seen or touched, but is certainly present. It is an ode to the elusive, deep understanding that the loss of a loved one is only a physical loss.

-Marcia
In my final year at ACAD, sick
I decided to take my elective studio courses in departments I had not previously expanded to. This year is largely my last constraint-free opportunity to make full-time, prosthetic
and I am working to enjoy every part of it. This semester, order I am taking a wheel-throwing class. This has proven very difficult; there is a huge amount of technique in throwing and subsequently a high level of frustration. Having just passed midterms, I am now feeling confident and comfortable on the wheel. It has been rewarding and soothing, and something that I will definitely pursue outside of school.

More than anything, this class has reminded me to not take myself too seriously this semester. Although my practice has remained quite serious throughout the year, I am still looking to soak up every free moment of making. My cups, bowls, and pitchers have been a very light-hearted experience and in turn compliment the thoughtful exploration taking place in my textile practice. I feel this is bringing a balance to my practice that I have learned from, and will take with me beyond my graduation from ACAD.

 

-Marcia

“The Only Way Around Is Through”

In a reaction to the loss of a loved one, healthful I decided to switch gears within my practice and focus on creating a work that allowed myself to work through the grief. This work took shape in the form of two weavings which are roughly 2′ x 6′. The weaving process is repetitive and therefore conducive to reflection. I feel this direction provided an outlet for my grieving process, while also providing new insights for my practice.

Weaving, In Progress
Weaving, In Progress

After reflecting on the process, I see that this was an important step towards facing what I did not want to; in the weeks between losing my grandmother and beginning the weaving process, I inadvertently kept myself busy with activities which would not bring up thoughts of the loss. Starting and following through with the weaving put a personal pressure on dealing with every aspect of my loss.

Weaving, In Progress
Weaving, In Progress

The scale of these woven pieces is meant to reflect a figure. I chose to keep everything concerning the weaving minimal, including the weaving structure and colour palette. I did not want any distraction from the conceptual meaning of the pieces. I chose to weave openly so there would be a high level of transparency in the cloth. These pieces stand for what is gone, but not lost. It is an attempt to put to materiality what cannot be seen or touched, but is certainly present. It is an ode to the elusive, deep understanding that the loss of a loved one is only a physical loss.

-Marcia

Chakra Cushions

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I’m working on a full set of chakra rugs as my body of work for class. The further I get in my process of making this set, cough the more I’m liking it – the accumalative process is something I am drawn to.

When I am finished there will be 7 rugs, troche each one representing one of the chakras. Each rug/padded cushion will have its respective chakra symbol lino-printed on the bottom on durable canvas.

It is interesting to connect the meditative process of weaving to the meditative function of the finished work. Although I’ve never personally meditated, tadalafil it is something that really interests me. Perhaps that is the reason why I am drawn to the colours and symbols of the chakras and what they represent.

Because I’m essentially making 7 of the same thing, the repetitive nature can sometimes get to be too much. So I work on two different colours at the same time so that if I get sick of one colour I can switch to the other one – it helps a little bit!

I’m excited to see the finished set of all seven cushions at the end of the semester…stay tuned!

~Madde~

//Unshelved// Art as Future-Making

I am lucky enough to be able to participate in an exhibit titled “Unshelved” with a lot of great artists from ACAD. This exhibit comes from Mireille Perron’s FINA 450 class and includes the work of students from nearly every department!

I wanted to take this great opportunity to create something different from my usual practice while still incorporating it in some way.

I chose to create a book of weaving – I used a found book of collected stories from one author who I chose to keep anonymous as it is not necessarily important in discussing what I wanted to portray with my work. I titled it “Anthology of Weaving” in which there are pages upon pages of hand woven book pages. I ripped out many pages throughout the book and cut them up into strips to weave back in to the remaining pages. By doing this I distorted the remaining text into my own story. This takes the traditional form of weaving into new dimensions.

On the inside cover I included this:

    ” Anthology of Weaving synthesizes two great art forms. Placed between the covers of the label “The Collected Stories”, see the viewer encounters a commentary on the versatility of the craft of weaving. Where the traditional practice of weaving utilizes a loom and fabric, syphilis this piece of art takes the pages of the art of writing and rebuilds it into a woven work. The sudden encounters of capital letters or italicized words draws in the readers attention, impotent which occasionally reveals complete sentences in the chaos. Such a thing can be found in woven fabric as well; highlighted stitches or dyed fabric capture the intrigue of the viewer and provides a means of contemplation as to the depth of the piece itself. Anthology of Weaving ultimately creates a commentary on possibilities, and depth of, the craft itself. With the combination of writing and weaving, the viewer begins to wonder just how far the craft can go. Look past the cover and lose yourself in the collected stories hidden within Anthology of Weaving. ”

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This exhibition is on display in the ACAD Luke Lindoe Library from March 8th-April 7th, 2016. There is an opening from 5-7 pm in the library on Thursday, March 10th, so come on down and check out some fantastic work from graduating students  at ACAD!

~Madde~

 

 

Fibre Arts Book Sale!

Over reading break in my hometown I decided to try and teach people how to knit.

I hosted a Wool and the Gang knitting party where they set up the event and sell the wool but I teach the class.

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It was very successful 13 people signed up and everyone finished there Snood Operator which was the name of the project.

 

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The knitting projects are super fun and for all levels of knitting and the best part is that you get your project for half the price and the host gets one for free!

Knit Parties

 

-Nicole
Luke Lindoe Library’s

Fibre Arts Book Sale

book_nerd1

February 25-27th

In conjunction with

‘Fibre Fortnight’ (https://acad.ca/fibre-fortnight-2016)

and

‘925: A Sterling Anniversary’ (https://acad.ca/925-A-Sterling-Anniversary)

Featuring the generous donation from the estate of SANDRA KRYSTALOWICH, health
award-winning Calgary quilter, physician
this sale will include

a treasure-trove of New and ‘As New’ books on all forms of Quilting, Embroidery and all aspects of the needle arts.

Thursday February 25th

ACAD Main Mall 12-5:30pm

Friday February 26th

Library 8:30am – 4:30pm

Saturday February 27th

Library 11am-5pm

CASH ONLY please (ATMs on campus)

 

For The Love of Tennis: Alternative Fibre

First, hemorrhoids a history lesson: Tennis was derived from from a sport called “real tennis” or “royal tennis”.  The ball can bounce off the walls, double bounce on either side of the net and generally, has a laundry list of complicated rules that I can’t even name.  It can still be played on 43 surviving courts around the world, however, the majority of tennis players around the globe have decided to move on to our modern version of tennis.

The main difference between the two versions of tennis that I am interested in is the tennis ball.  Unlike todays modern, hollow, yellow felt balls, the sport of real tennis plays with a denser, usually white ball. This real tennis ball is handmade.  The core is cork and is then wrapped in a fabric tape.  The ball is then covered with melton cloth and stitched closed.

Upon acquiring a real tennis ball, I decided to take it apart.  Below is an image of my woven work: linen warp and real tennis ball fabric tape weft.

real tennis

 

-Madison

Gather and Be Alone Together Closing Reception

As I continue my colour research I must acknowledge the artists who work with the absence of colour. Two artists I have been looking at are Maximilian Schubert and Piero Manzoni, what is ed who have a very similar aesthetic.

Schubert is an American artist working with materials towards a minimalist end result. One series of his  imagines “painting-as-object”, anabolics mixing sculpture and painting elements into one. The pieces are done in an all white palette which are then left titled Untitled. Another series inspired by drawing, treat uses brass to create sculptural or 3D drawings. Information on him and his art is limited on line, while lots of images are available.

Schubert 1Schubert 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Format #14- #16, 2013. Brass.

Untitled, 2013. Cast acrylic polyurethane, epoxy, fibreglass, acrylic and vinyl paint.

Manzoni was an Italian artist living from 1933-1963. He is the artist we all know as the guy who canned his own feces and sold it as art. However, what I am interested in is his sculptural, monochromatic paintings. Similar to Schubert’s pieces, Manzoni drew his inspiration from questioning traditional artistic practices, experimenting with new materials and really playing into conceptual art.

W1siZiIsIjE1MDk0OSJdLFsicCIsImNvbnZlcnQiLCItcmVzaXplIDEyODB4MTI4MFx1MDAzRSJdXQ          W1siZiIsIjcwNjIxIl0sWyJwIiwiY29udmVydCIsIi1yZXNpemUgMTI4MHgxMjgwXHUwMDNFIl1d

Achrome, 1960. Kaolin on canvas.

Achrome, 1962. Fibreglass on velvet-covered wood.

 

See Schubert’s work and writing on it here:

http://www.mutualart.com/Exhibitions/Maximilian-Schubert/3AC64AE484AAC775#Info

https://www.artsy.net/artist/maximilian-schubert/works

 

See Manzoni’s work and writing on it here:

http://www.moma.org/collection/artists/3741?=undefined&page=1

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/piero-manzoni-1571

 

-Emily
Please join us on Thursday, physician
January 21 from 5 to 7PM at John Fluevog Calgary (207 8 Ave SW) for the closing reception of Gather and Be Alone Together.

This group exhibition features the work of seven fibre artists from Alberta College of Art + Design. Gather and Be Alone Together explores the community of craft and the solitude of creation. The works show a wide range of fibre techniques including weaving, surgeon
embroidery, infection
knitting and cloth dyeing. Many of the works exemplify the importance of the hand-made and explore the significance of this in today’s society. Works in the show present us with quiet reflections of the artist’s meditations and hold the memories of their process in the creation of the work.

The show takes its name from a quote by Ann Hamilton, a contemporary artist who draws inspiration from one of the most well known textile artists in history, Anni Albers. A nod to both past and present, you are invited to Gather and Be Alone Together.

 

Showcard Front

 

Making our own river molds!

A couple weeks ago our papermaking class went to the woodshop and learned how to make floating river molds. 2015-11-06 14.56.28

Floating molds allow you to control the colour and variety of pulp. You can also pull much thicker sheets and are overall more versatile.

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We are very fortunate to have 2 amazing technicians in the woodshop, dermatologist here’s Bill Hornecker and the lovely and talented Carolyn Qualle working with 2 students.

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Congratulations, now go make some paper!

 

Interview

Last week I went to check out the library book sale that ACAD had going on and I found some goodies! The one I was most excited about was this “Kaleidoscope – New Quilts from an Old Favorite” book.

photo by Madison Appleton
photo by Madison Appleton

I have made a couple blankets in the past and have really enjoyed the process. Lately I have been thinking about learning how to quilt but what scares me is how precise and exact you have to be. The style of quilts that you traditionally see are very…well, more about traditional, ailment so it was nice to see the quilts in this book which are more brightly coloured and ‘funky’. This style of quilting interests me a lot more and fits more with my practice using crystals and the geometric shape. The use of colour in the quilts in this book inspire me to continue using such vibrant colours in my work.

 

~Madde~

An interview with Madde Appleton

Q. Did you always know you wanted to go into fibre when you came to ACAD?

“I had no idea! I tried out a lot of different areas in my first year, seek and even in my second year. But after my first year I definitely started to realize fibre was one of my favourites, and that interest has continued to grow ever since!”

Q. What do you like to focus on in your practice? (materials, techniques, concept?)

“I like to focus on the colours of my materials and the tactile nature they provide. I like my materials to be soft, often giving off the feeling of comfort and making one feel cozy. My materials are usually very colourful and bright. “

Q. What is one of your pieces (or series) that you are the most proud of?

“Something that I am most proud of would probably have to be a set of 2 handwoven bamboo scarves I made at the end of my third year. They were the product of trying something new: a new loom, new materials, new patterns, new techniques. I was super happy with how they turned out and by trying something new I fell in love with another material, bamboo, which I now will use in my weaving quite frequently!”

 

Thanks Madde!

 

-Nicole