Quilter Land

I finally have a better idea of what I would like my quilt to look like! Julie gave me a couple of artists that she thought I should look at; I fell in love with Debra M. Smith’s work. Most of her work is pieced from vintage kimono silks.  Below are some examples of her work that I enjoyed.

Debra Smith 2014

The Edge Of Thought, psychotherapist Series #1 35 x 26 inch 2014

Source: http://debramsmith.com/whiteblack#/id/i8466783

 

 

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Yielding Resistance series, #4, 2009-2010

Source: http://debramsmith.com/whitered#/id/i6309302

 

SO with those two pieces in mind I came up with a rough draft of what I am aiming for with this quilt.

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Fear not, these are not the colors I’m aiming for. Illustrator just wasn’t cooperating with me so I kept it fairly neutral. I would like to use cochineal as my main source of dye. I read online that distilled water is the key to a cochineal red so I will be giving that a shot. The shade I wind up with will determine the rest of the color plate.

-Asma

New Maps of Paradise: Eric + Mia

New Maps of Paradise, recipe currently on display at the Nickle Arts Museum at the University of Calgary features the work of artists Eric Moschopedis and Mia Rushton.  Both artists are Calgary based and the work is focused on community based social projects that the two artists have performed collaboratively since 2007.  Moschopedis comes from a theatre background, while Rushton is focused on a craft based practice.

There is a strong presence of textiles present within the show, including the work titled because even under the cover of darkness we are haunted by the past.  This work is an ongoing quilting project that began in 2012.  The artists conducted ten-question interviews with people they were familiar with.  After the interviews, the artists would choose a phrase that they felt represented the interviewee and imagined that phrase in the form of a quilt.

cover of darkness

Another textile work in the show is we knew the future/before disappearing all together.  This work consists of four quilted banners, spelling out the title of the work on either side of four panels.  This piece represents and celebrates youthful hope, demise and the collectivity of the art community.  From one side of the gallery you can read the words, we knew the future, while from the other side of the gallery you can read, before disappearing all together.

Diana Sherlock’s curatorial ability to translate this performative work into a museum display was due to her borrowing cultural geography and ethnological display techniques.  The work requires the viewer to engage and read the accompanying text.  However, the viewer is rewarded with a clear and deep understanding of the meaning of the work upon doing so.

Running until April 2nd, Eric and Mia: New Maps of Paradise is a strong representation of craft, community and the city of Calgary as a whole.

(image courtesy the artists website: http://www.ericandmia.ca/#/because-even-under-the-cover-of-darkness-we-are-haunted-by-the-past/)

 

-Madison

Pechakucha – Quilts: Traditional & Contemporary

I tried to upload my power point Pechakucha, but it didn’t work. The point was to show that even though quilts have changed through the years, they really haven’t.  We still do log cabins, though now, some may be wonky, and our strips might be more curved, people are still enjoying making comfortable objects that are a joy to behold.  People can use plexiglass templates instead of cutting up cereal boxes.  There are changes like better tools and better threads and fabrics (there was that polyester period – yuck) and long arm machines that make quilting easier, but you can still make quilts the same way our great grandmothers did.

In these pictures, I’ve included a rag quilt, grandmother’s flower garden, an Irish chain, a postage stamp quilt, a medallion quilt, Sunbonnet Sue, Overall Sam, a crazy quilt, a log cabin, some appliqué, a Baltimore album and at the bottom are some “modern” quilts and a bargello.  People are having more fun, making wearable art and covering chairs, walls, trees and cars.  I can’t wait to be part of what happens next in the quilting world .

Margaret  Jessop

My Mom

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IMG_3189Mom copy

These are pictures of the quilt I made of my Mom.She’s been a musician, drugstore an accompanist and a music teacher her whole life.   wanted to honour her with a quilt.  My challenge was to make her entirely out of music themed fabrics.  These pictures represent my progress.  I started on muslin.I added my fabrics collage style and when I was finished, I laid a piece of muslin on top and then quilted it – a lot!

Margaret Jessop

Using a Long Arm Quilting Machine

IMG_3190sewing

Please click on the link above. It’s a short clip of me working on my long arm sewing machine.  Instead of moving the fabric, capsule on a long arm, you move the machine.  The reason it is called a long arm is because the arm is 18″ long compared to 6″ to 10″ on a regular sewing machine.  Also, most long arm machines are 8′ to 14′ long.  Mine is currently set at 10′ which works well for me.  My studio isn’t very big so 10′ is the max.  It can hold most quilts on it.  Anyway, I love my long arm.  I can quilt 18″ by the width of a quilt up to 9′ in a much shorter time than I could with my regular machine.

Margaret Jessop

Post Flood Quilting Studio

So, we were allowed back into our house almost five months ago.  I thought I’d give you an update.  Even though my studio is not as beautiful as it was and I’ve lost a lot of books, patterns, fabrics, notions and lots of UFO’s, I am back working in my studio.  I couldn’t sew for almost four months.  It feels great to be back in business.  My long arm quilting machine made it, even though there’s some rust inside the table legs, and I bought a new Elna sewing machine with the insurance money.  We also replaced the furnace, water heater, windows, door and drywall.  Carpets and a fridge have been donated as well as fabric, books, notions and magazines.  People have been awfully good to us.  Anyway, even if I have to live with pink insulation and fabric for walls, it feels great to be back in business!

Margaret J

Susan Carlson – Fibre Collage Artist

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I took my first course from  Susan in 2006.  She taught me a great collage technique that I use to this day.  It’s relatively quick  (faster than piecing) and I love it.  I have taken four courses from Susan over the years – in Canmore and Kalispell, pulmonologist and have learned a lot.  She has a great eye for colour and shape.

Susan Carlson grew up in Maryland and graduated with a Fine Arts degree in Illustration.  She worked as a graphics artist until she “met a really cute guy” (her words) in Maine.  They married and lived in New Hampshire, and now, Berwick, Maine.  They built a yurt and set up her studio.  She has been doing art quilts since 1994 and has been teaching for the last 12 years. In 2012, she had a bout with breast cancer. She has had three books published and teaches internationally.

I wanted to share with you, my mentor, Susan.  These are pictures of her, before and after, with some of her quilts.

Margaret Jessop

 

Roxanne Nelson – Fibre Artist

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cough ‘serif'”>I was doing some research on embroidery and I found this amazing book called 1000 Artisan Textiles by Sandra Salamony. This book illustrates thousands of artworks including tapestries, wearable art, embroidery and so on. Susan Sorrell is one of the embroidery artists that fascinates me. I also notice that we have same interests on embellishing our works using threads and beads.

Here is an example of Sorrell’s work.

Sorrell, Susan. Split Personality. 9”x8.5”. 2004. Creative Chick Studios. Web. 20 Nov 2013.
Sorrell, Susan. Split Personality. 9”x8.5”. 2004. Creative Chick Studios. Web. 20 Nov 2013.

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Susan Sorrell is a mixed media/fibre artist. She has been working with textiles since 1998. It is inspiring to learn that she uses her life as the concept of her work. She likes to combine the technique of painting, beading, sewing, and embellishing on fabric in order to express herself.  I am so grateful that I had a chance to talk with Susan Sorrell via e-mail.

 

Q: What is the purpose of your artwork?

A: I guess my sole purpose is to get the creative juices flowing and my art out into the world. I have all of these ideas jumbling around my head that have to be unleashed. I like to play in all types of art mediums and explore where my mind takes me. 

 

Q: Is there a specific style you use for your embroidery work? How did you learn your embroidery techniques?

A: As for my embroidery technique….you might call it free form. I don’t really follow any rules. I learned on my own from books, since, there were no videos online at the time. 

Q: Is there an artist you relate to?

A: I have always like Matisse for his color and designs. Also, I like Picasso for his versatility and not letting his artwork to be constricted to just one type of art medium. As for contemporary artists, i am discovering new artists every week that I find interesting and like their styles, or designs, or their philosophy. 

 

Q: How do you feel when people interpret your artwork differently?

A: I think it is sort of flattering when people are inspired by my work, but if they are trying to copy my work, I don’t know why unless it is to use as a practice piece. I don’t take kindly for any artist to copy another artist for profit. 

 

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring artists?  

A: Read a lot of marketing books or take classes in business. Also, talk to other artists about their experiences and how they have traversed the ins and outs of being an artist. I am a big believer in having another income source or something to fall back on, until you can support yourself with your artwork. You become an artist for the love of being creative and not for the profits you might make. 

Here is Susan’s website: www.creativechick.com

Wendy

I I recently took a class from Roxanne Nelson.  She makes beautiful quilts primarily based on parrots.  She is a very inspiring teacher and I was curious in how she got where she was.  She has always considered herself a fibre artist – not a quilter.  She is basically self taught – mostly from books.  Roxanne has been experimenting with many kinds of fabric over the years. In 1995, drugs
she took a class from Laurel Francis of Shaggy Dog Designs, and started working on her own technique.  She has always had an obsession with parrots and has made many wall quilts that depict parrots.  She takes her time making her quilts; each one takes one to five years.  She found a photo of a parrot in a magazine and made it into her most famous quilt “Ruffled Feathers”.   She feels it is very important to get permission from the photographer.   Roxanne requested permission to use a parrot photo from Florida photographer, Gayle Reader, another parrot fan, and they have since become close friends.  Her quilts have travelled to many Quilt Shows including Quilt Canada in Calgary and the International Quilt Festival in Houston.  and her quilt “Ruffled Feathers” has appeared on the cover on two international magazines.

Roxanne continues to teach and creates beautiful wall quilts; she is currently making a very detailed duck.  Meanwhile, she teaches business administrations at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology.

I hope to take another course from her next year.

Margaret Jessop

International Quilt Show – Houston

Last week, allergy
I went to the International Quilt Festival in Houston, decease
Texas with 26, visit
000 other quilters.  It was the first time ever that I had  enough courage to enter the show and I was honoured to have two quilts juried in to the show.  It was really great to see my quilts next to quilts from Argentina, Spain, Japan, France, the United States and more.

While I was there, I attended lectures by some of the big names in the quilting world: Hollis Chatelaine, Caryl Bryer Fallert, and Kaffe Fassett.  I took some technique courses from Noriko Endo and Karen Stone.  I also took a blogging vs website course and a photoshop course.  All of these were aimed at Fibre Artists.  I did a lot of networking, exchanging cards and blog sites.  The consensus was blogging was cheaper and more beneficial than websites and you can do a lot more with fabric and a computer.

IMG_3093 2If you ever get near one of these big international shows or Quilt Canada (next year in Ontario), please check it out.  Quilts are not the same any more.

– Margaret Jessop

4th Annual Administration Area Student Art Exhibition

This year I was lucky enough to get three of my quilts accepted into the 4th Annual Administration Area Student Art Exhibition. I was quite honoured that people would want to be able to see my work for a year.  My “Castle Mountain” quilt is in the Registrar’s office and the “West Coast Blues” and “Rocky Mountain Trees”are down the hall in the 4th floor administration offices.  It sure feels good to have your work appreciated.  I recommend that everyone put their work in next time.  Fibre makes people feel good; fibre is comforting (for the most part).

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These are the ones they chose.  I made them all last year in Mackenzie’s Fibre class.

– Margaret Jessop

 

Nature & Fabric

 

Lately, I have been working in my studio trying to replicate nature with commercial and dyed fabrics.  I looked up from my work and noticed all the brilliant colours just outside my studio.  So, I thought I’d play a bit. I put my yellows with the yellows, the wood fabrics on wood and stones on the stones.  Some blended in perfectly and some were blatantly wrong.  I think I might pursue some of the fabrics meshing with nature. I particularly liked the yellow leaves, the stones, and the dried leaves. The wood fabrics sis not match at all, while others blended in.

Meanwhile, just wanted to share an afternoon of fun and experimentation.

Margaret

Lane Four Presents: A Rhapsody of Colours

IMG_1321 IMG_1322 IMG_1323 IMG_1324I went to this exhibition in Sydney, audiologist
Australia.  Designer Roopa Pemmaraju with Indigenous Artists Pauline Gallagher, Judy Napangardi Watson, Elizabeth Napajarri Katakarinja and Rowena Nungarrayi Larry.  They worked together to come up with designs to digitally print onto silk and then transform into clothing.  It was wonderful to see the people, cultures, fashion and art all fusing together. It was also a unique place for a gallery; it was in a laneway between two office buildings.

Margaret

The Canadian Quilter

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This is the cover of “The Canadian Quilter” magazine Autumn 2013 edition.  i got it in the mail this week.  I was thrilled when I opened it up and saw the quilt I made with my children’s pictures on it.

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This quilt is called “The Four Elements”: water, hepatitis earth, symptoms fire, and air

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This is a detail of Paul’s eye (earth).

This quilt was in competition at Quilt Canada in Penticton, BC in May this year.  I won a judge’s choice.  I was honoured.  Thanks for letting me share.

Margaret

The Alberta Flood Rose Project

Trompe l’oeil prints have been trending in large fashion houses over the past couple of seasons, nurse but I have found that Mary Katrantzou has mastered them above all else. Her pioneering in digital printing has changed how I view textiles. Working within concepts around sacred spaces, sovaldi I have been documenting my environments of pilgrimages. Landscapes and textures; all to placed back unto the body. Like Katrantzou, dosage the print tends to articulate what the form will be.

I think when the print changes throughout the process, the silhouette has to change and vice versa. It’s important for me, because I started by studying architecture and I like being able to form the body in that way. And it’s very interesting when you work the print to create an illusion and almost define a silhouette, because that’s, I guess, what makes my prints more unique.

(Prints for Dress #1)

Thinking about design, I take a very minimalist approach. Both for aesthetic and technical purposes, much like Katrantzou, which she discusses in an interview with Katia Bololia. “When I first started, my knowledge of pattern cutting and my understanding of the silhouette and how to bring it to life was a lot more limited, so I started with shift dresses with strong prints that defined the entire silhouette.” I am one of those girls who is defined by my gender. That being said, fashion has influenced my practice immeasurably. As a seamstress, I have come a long way and still have many learning curves to battle. As an artist, I am having a difficult time in pulling the reigns on the creative process. As a fibre based artist, I am abashed at my technical skills. Prior to, I struggled with carrying out my visions due to poor delivery. I have never been a process person. I need instant gratification, which the silk screen could never give me. Until now. Don’t print? No problem, just pay someone else to. In walks Spoonflower, sweeping me off my feet and changing the way I work. For those who have yet to use the digital printer, it is worthwhile to play around with custom fabrics.

Dayna Ellen, Horse Shoe Canyon/ Cactus, Mirror Repeat

Dayna Ellen, Horseshoe Canyon/Landscape, Mirror Repeat, 2013

(Prints for Dress #2)

I am currently struggling through the dilemma of presentation within the art craft divide. I make dresses. Dresses go on the body… Or mannequin. My work is very personal so I usually visualize myself in the dress, make for my body type… The mannequin seems so anticlimactic, devoiding it of its meaning. It is now just a functional form. Phoebe English, another emerging British designer, just recently show cased her SS14 collection with the most unique performance. English collaborated with set designer David White to create a post apocalyptic installation for the centrepiece of her at walk. I found it to be a unique way of incorporating installation and performance together as a way of show casing her wearable work. She also has amazing short fashion films that I am interested in as far as presentation. Body. Space. Experience. I believe my aim within my wearable practice is to combine print, fashion, performance and installation into one cohesive fusion. Like I said, I have a few learning curves to battle.

 

 

– Dayna

     After the flood, read
there was a call out to all artists to produce a 4″ Alberta Wild Rose to raise money for flood victims.  My daughter and I had spent weeks cleaning up after the flood and we thought it would be good to do something positive, troche
 and fun and creative.  So, unhealthy
we made our roses and sent them in.  Last week, I received this book in the mail.  We have been published.  They took 800 of the roses submitted,   framed them in  them in groups of 100 and auctioned them off.

IMG_2531 framed them in  them in groups of 100 and auctioned them off.  Then they published these books.

IMG_2528This is my rose.

Margaret Jessop

 

The Flood & my new studio

We moved to Bowness on June 4th.  A couple of weeks later, it flooded.  I had just about finished setting up my studio.  It was looking beautiful.  I lost tools, fabric, and lots of UFO’s (UnFinished Objects).

The first picture is our house in the river on June 22nd.  The others are a few days later when we were allowed in.This is what my new studio looked like. The river took two large windows even though we had plywooded and sandbagged.

It’s been a long summer cleaning it up.

Margaret