Fibre Arts Book Sale!

Over reading break in my hometown I decided to try and teach people how to knit.

I hosted a Wool and the Gang knitting party where they set up the event and sell the wool but I teach the class.

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It was very successful 13 people signed up and everyone finished there Snood Operator which was the name of the project.

 

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The knitting projects are super fun and for all levels of knitting and the best part is that you get your project for half the price and the host gets one for free!

Knit Parties

 

-Nicole
Luke Lindoe Library’s

Fibre Arts Book Sale

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February 25-27th

In conjunction with

‘Fibre Fortnight’ (https://acad.ca/fibre-fortnight-2016)

and

‘925: A Sterling Anniversary’ (https://acad.ca/925-A-Sterling-Anniversary)

Featuring the generous donation from the estate of SANDRA KRYSTALOWICH, health
award-winning Calgary quilter, physician
this sale will include

a treasure-trove of New and ‘As New’ books on all forms of Quilting, Embroidery and all aspects of the needle arts.

Thursday February 25th

ACAD Main Mall 12-5:30pm

Friday February 26th

Library 8:30am – 4:30pm

Saturday February 27th

Library 11am-5pm

CASH ONLY please (ATMs on campus)

 

For The Love of Tennis: Alternative Fibre

First, hemorrhoids a history lesson: Tennis was derived from from a sport called “real tennis” or “royal tennis”.  The ball can bounce off the walls, double bounce on either side of the net and generally, has a laundry list of complicated rules that I can’t even name.  It can still be played on 43 surviving courts around the world, however, the majority of tennis players around the globe have decided to move on to our modern version of tennis.

The main difference between the two versions of tennis that I am interested in is the tennis ball.  Unlike todays modern, hollow, yellow felt balls, the sport of real tennis plays with a denser, usually white ball. This real tennis ball is handmade.  The core is cork and is then wrapped in a fabric tape.  The ball is then covered with melton cloth and stitched closed.

Upon acquiring a real tennis ball, I decided to take it apart.  Below is an image of my woven work: linen warp and real tennis ball fabric tape weft.

real tennis

 

-Madison

Artist in Residency- Call for applicants is open!

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Friends and arts supporters, noun

We are currently accepting applications to be part of this dynamic and vital part of Calgary’s cultural scene as participants in a self-directed summer residency and end of residency exhibition. Residency participants will have the option to work with the group to develop a community of fibre artists through workshops, information pills critique sessions and exhibitions throughout the year.
We are seeking individuals who:

  • Are interested in working within a co-operative studio setting
  • Will be actively involved in, ambulance and contribute to, our community
  • Seek access to affordable studio space and specialized equipment
  • Are interested in sharing their knowledge and skills through teaching and collaboration
  • Appreciate and practice the diversity of textile arts and craft
  • Embrace an environmental approach to studio production
  • Are ready to commit a fee of $250 for a three-month, or $150 for one-month summer studio rental and access to equipment.
  • Will contribute to the end of summer residency exhibition.

Please visit – Contextural.ca for more information on our mission, vision, and values.

Residency Dates

One-month residencies are May 29 – July 3 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm) and July 24 – 

August 28 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in on Sunday, July 24 at 1:00pm).

Three-month residency is May 29 – August 28 with mandatory attendance for orientation/move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm.

How To Apply – Please review the attached submission information package or visit contextural.ca/residency-application. Current Contextural members are only required to submit a statement of intent unless you would like to be considered for the scholarship. See the scholarship section below for details.

Deadline for submissions is Sunday, March 27th @ midnightIf accepted, residency fees are due with the acceptance form and supply order form by May 1st.

Again this year, Contextural will be offering the Contextural Summer Residency Scholarship to individuals or members applying for the three-month residency. The scholarship includes studio fees for the three-month summer residency ($250 value) and $250 for supplies.

For questions regarding the Contextural Summer Residency, please direct them to us at residency@contextural.ca

 

 
The Textile Arts Center seeks (8) eight artists or designers, medic
working within the field of textiles and fiber arts, pathopsychology
 looking to deepen their own artistic practice to partake in its Artists In Residence program for the 2016 – 2017 cycle.

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Applications are due April 17, 2016. APPLY HERE !

Now accepting applications: 2016 Contextural Self-Directed Summer Residency Program – Deadline March 27

ball_logo

Friends and arts supporters, info

We are currently accepting applications to be part of this dynamic and vital part of Calgary’s cultural scene as participants in a self-directed summer residency and end of residency exhibition. Residency participants will have the option to work with the group to develop a community of fibre artists through workshops, treat critique sessions and exhibitions throughout the year.
We are seeking individuals who:

  • Are interested in working within a co-operative studio setting
  • Will be actively involved in, caries and contribute to, our community
  • Seek access to affordable studio space and specialized equipment
  • Are interested in sharing their knowledge and skills through teaching and collaboration
  • Appreciate and practice the diversity of textile arts and craft
  • Embrace an environmental approach to studio production
  • Are ready to commit a fee of $250 for a three-month, or $150 for one-month summer studio rental and access to equipment.
  • Will contribute to the end of summer residency exhibition.

Please visit – Contextural.ca for more information on our mission, vision, and values.

Residency Dates

One-month residencies are May 29 – July 3 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm) and July 24 – 

August 28 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in on Sunday, July 24 at 1:00pm).

Three-month residency is May 29 – August 28 with mandatory attendance for orientation/move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm.

How To Apply – Please review the attached submission information package or visit contextural.ca/residency-application. Current Contextural members are only required to submit a statement of intent unless you would like to be considered for the scholarship. See the scholarship section below for details.

Deadline for submissions is Sunday, March 27th @ midnightIf accepted, residency fees are due with the acceptance form and supply order form by May 1st.

Again this year, Contextural will be offering the Contextural Summer Residency Scholarship to individuals or members applying for the three-month residency. The scholarship includes studio fees for the three-month summer residency ($250 value) and $250 for supplies.

For questions regarding the Contextural Summer Residency, please direct them to us at residency@contextural.ca

 

 

Author Interview: Fashion History With April Calahan

My show Anastigmatic is up in the Marion Nicoll Gallery’s LRT space. It runs from January 18 – February 19.

There will be a reception on February 4th at 5pm in the Main Mall.

I hope to see you there!

Burned

Anastigmatic is an investigation of stereotypes and the stigmas and shame associated with stains. Three garments were deconstructed, what is ed rearranged and hand stitched back together. Their new form frees them from their previous function and yet are still recognizable in relation to the body. The marks that appear disrupt the continuity of the cloth; one stained, one burned, and one bleached. Each one is uncomfortably permanent and unquestionably vulnerable. This method of exposing the garments raises the  questions: Can a stain be embraced? Is there value in a stain? Can a stain stimulate growth?

Carly Hynes is a Fibre Artist soon to complete her BFA at Alberta College of Art + Design. Growth is an ongoing concept in her studio practice where she uses her connection with cloth as a way to explore personal identity and her environment.

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Found a interesting podcast that I wanted to share! It has some great info and resources.
April has two books out about fashion history, viagra dosage
one featuring historical fashion plates, viagra and another on the pochoir technique used to create fashion illustrations in the early 20th century.

Listen to the podcast here. 

Also this blog run by the author is also amazing! Check it out here.

-Caroline

Knit-A-Thon

The Little Hippies Foundation is a Calgary-based organization that provides free yoga programs to kids who are sick, prescription recovering, approved have Special Needs, web or who come from low-income families.

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This winter, we are bringing our community (including Y O U !) together for a Knit-A-Thon to fundraise money to support these programs & mental health initiatives!

When: January 31st, 2016  10am-5pm

Where: Eau Claire Market Community Space

Who: Anyone + Everyone – No knitting experience required!

What: Knitting scarves, mitts, toques, etc. for 7-ish hours to raise money for The Little Hippies Foundation. Live local music + performers, warm drinks, and yummy food provided for participants.

All knitted goods will be donated to kids at Inn from the Cold and Journey House- a transitional housing unit for single mothers. (Can’t finish? Don’t worry! We have volunteers who will be finishing up all unfinished projects)

For more information, please go to their website

Laura Vickerson: The Between

This Friday the Esker had an opening for two exhibitions, buy Jack Bush: In Studio and Colleen Heslin: Needles and Pins. I felt completely comforted seeing paintings along with collaged linen both focused on colour presented within one gallery, it was everything I could ask for in a show! These are two artists I will continue to research and take inspiration from.

Jack Bush: In Studio included 20 paintings made by Jack Bush, a Canadian painter who worked on a large scale with colour as his main subject matter. The exhibition was meant as an ode to his time spent in his own studio.

“The most intimate conversations held in the studio were between Jack and his primary subject: colour. He once told curator and critic Karen Wilkin that colour would speak to him – telling him what colour might be placed next, and so on. ”

– Sarah Stanners

Colleen Heslin’s collages filled the left half of the gallery space. Heslin’s work is referred to as ‘painting’ by the curator, but I would call it textile collaging meets painting. She has sewn together linen and cotton which have been dyed or ink stained. The pieces are then stretched onto a paint stretcher. Heslin explores the themes always present in textiles (femininity, domesticity) in combination with painting and of course colour. From a distance, they appear as paintings, mostly because they are hung on the wall. As you move closer one can begin to appreciate the handiwork involved in creating her pieces.

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 Jack Bush. Big A, 1963-1965.

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Colleen Heslin. Attitude, 2015.

If you haven’t already, you should go see the show! Hooray for colour!

 

See and read further on the show/ their work here:

Fall Exhibitions

http://www.colleenheslin.com

https://www.gallery.ca/en/see/collections/artist.php?iartistid=816

-Emily
Hope to see you at the Nickle Galleries, ailment
Thursday February 4th!

Laura Vickerson Invitation EVITE

And the award for best mom goes to…

We laugh a lot about the stretching gap between his needs and mine. Him needing more of his own space and my covert needs to keep on smothering him with maternal love. I am a textiles designer and he often helps me and has great creative ideas. So we started to fantasize how we could visualize this puberty gap. So I suggested to make a cuddly version of him!

Read the entire article here

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Production sewing class coming this February!

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ACAD Alumni Bree Zorel and her partner Juan Jose have started Tenderfield: adventures in handmade, remedy
ethical textiles sourced from Chile and/ or made in Canada.

Tenderfield celebrates considerate design and slow cloth – textiles that are handmade, recycled, all-natural, fair trade, and made with purpose. We believe in supporting textile knowledge and technologies, skill sharing, and cloth as a community building activity. We teach classes and provide thoughtfully made goods for those who appreciate the delights of slowly and considerately made textiles.

DSC_0122

Tenderfield fibres, whether yarns or recycled fabrics, are chosen for their pure natural fibre content whenever possible. Natural fibres include alpaca, lambswool, cashmere, merino, linen, leather, silk, and cotton. Whether hailing from flora or fauna, we believe that the pleasure of natural fibres next to our skin and in our homes is the squishiest, softest, and loveliest thing we could ask.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield is helping support the continuation of hand made textile traditions through the practice, economic support, and transmission of knowledge of knitting, quilting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, shoemaking, mending, and other traditional fibre techniques. Artisans are all paid a fair wage for their creations, whether articles are made in Canada or in South America. 
ACAD Alumni Bree Zorel and her partner Juan Jose have started Tenderfield: adventures in handmade, Mycoplasmosis
ethical textiles sourced from Chile and/ or made in Canada.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield celebrates considerate design and slow cloth – textiles that are handmade, recycled, all-natural, fair trade, and made with purpose. We believe in supporting textile knowledge and technologies, skill sharing, and cloth as a community building activity. We teach classes and provide thoughtfully made goods for those who appreciate the delights of slowly and considerately made textiles.

DSC_0122

Tenderfield fibres, whether yarns or recycled fabrics, are chosen for their pure natural fibre content whenever possible. Natural fibres include alpaca, lambswool, cashmere, merino, linen, leather, silk, and cotton. Whether hailing from flora or fauna, we believe that the pleasure of natural fibres next to our skin and in our homes is the squishiest, softest, and loveliest thing we could ask.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield is helping support the continuation of hand made textile traditions through the practice, economic support, and transmission of knowledge of knitting, quilting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, shoemaking, mending, and other traditional fibre techniques. Artisans are all paid a fair wage for their creations, whether articles are made in Canada or in South America. 

static1.squarespace.com

ACAD Alumni Bree Zorel and her partner Juan Jose have started Tenderfield: adventures in handmade, ask
ethical textiles sourced from Chile and/ or made in Canada.

Tenderfield celebrates considerate design and slow cloth – textiles that are handmade, viagra recycled, this
all-natural, fair trade, and made with purpose. We believe in supporting textile knowledge and technologies, skill sharing, and cloth as a community building activity. We teach classes and provide thoughtfully made goods for those who appreciate the delights of slowly and considerately made textiles.

DSC_0122

Tenderfield fibres, whether yarns or recycled fabrics, are chosen for their pure natural fibre content whenever possible. Natural fibres include alpaca, lambswool, cashmere, merino, linen, leather, silk, and cotton. Whether hailing from flora or fauna, we believe that the pleasure of natural fibres next to our skin and in our homes is the squishiest, softest, and loveliest thing we could ask.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield is helping support the continuation of hand made textile traditions through the practice, economic support, and transmission of knowledge of knitting, quilting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, shoemaking, mending, and other traditional fibre techniques. Artisans are all paid a fair wage for their creations, whether articles are made in Canada or in South America. 
The Sewing Production Class is a 4 hour intensive masterclass where students will come out with 5 quality sewn products ready to sell. If you want to improve your sewing, purchase get faster and make something to sell at show and sell, urticaria
this is for you. You can sign-up for more information and a checklist to get ready for selling at a craft sale at http://eepurl.com/bLjezT <https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Feepurl.com%2FbLjezT&h=jAQH6QUHP>

production-sewing-class-poster

Making our own river molds!

A couple weeks ago our papermaking class went to the woodshop and learned how to make floating river molds. 2015-11-06 14.56.28

Floating molds allow you to control the colour and variety of pulp. You can also pull much thicker sheets and are overall more versatile.

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We are very fortunate to have 2 amazing technicians in the woodshop, dermatologist here’s Bill Hornecker and the lovely and talented Carolyn Qualle working with 2 students.

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Congratulations, now go make some paper!

 

Tenderfield

Much like Tessa Farmer work, see the artist Kate Clark utilizes taxidermy in her practice. I feel a great connection with Kate Clarks work as she focuses on the subject of anthropomorphism quite literally. I think it is within human nature to draw connections between ourselves and others that are not human, website whether that be a plant, information pills an animal or simply an inanimate object, in order to create a greater understanding between Human and other. I think out of these animals are most easily anthropomorphized. We can see this in fairy tales as these short stories which often contain animals with both animal and human characteristics playing on our own assumption that animals have human characteristics and humans have animal characteristics. With Kate Clarks work I believe that is speaks well to the idea of literally living in someone else’s skin to find a relation that wasn’t there before. I found this video of her talking about her practice and found it interesting to learn that she also works with sculpey in her practice, as this is a material I have been using in order to sculpt the faces hands and feet on my Chimera creatures.

Take a look at this video and I hope you enjoy!!

-Amy

static1.squarespace.com

ACAD Alumni Bree Zorel and her partner Juan Jose have started Tenderfield: adventures in handmade, anaemia
ethical textiles sourced from Chile and/ or made in Canada.

Tenderfield celebrates considerate design and slow cloth – textiles that are handmade, recycled, all-natural, fair trade, and made with purpose. We believe in supporting textile knowledge and technologies, skill sharing, and cloth as a community building activity. We teach classes and provide thoughtfully made goods for those who appreciate the delights of slowly and considerately made textiles.

DSC_0122

Tenderfield fibres, whether yarns or recycled fabrics, are chosen for their pure natural fibre content whenever possible. Natural fibres include alpaca, lambswool, cashmere, merino, linen, leather, silk, and cotton. Whether hailing from flora or fauna, we believe that the pleasure of natural fibres next to our skin and in our homes is the squishiest, softest, and loveliest thing we could ask.

static1.squarespace.com

Tenderfield is helping support the continuation of hand made textile traditions through the practice, economic support, and transmission of knowledge of knitting, quilting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, shoemaking, mending, and other traditional fibre techniques. Artisans are all paid a fair wage for their creations, whether articles are made in Canada or in South America.