ACAD | Fibre

Area of Study Blog

Archive for the 'Miscellaneous Fibre Goodness' Category

How to make your own sewing mannequin!

Here’s an easy how to guide to make your very own sewing mannequin!

http://www.handimania.com/diy/your-own-shape-sewing-mannequin.html

Artist Talk with Anne Steves – Next Wednesday March 8, 7pm

The Contextural Fibre Arts cooperative, clinic in partnership with ACAD, viagra order  would like to officially invite you to attend the upcoming artist talk with textile and thread based media artist Anne J Steves.   

Location: STANFORD PERROTT LECTURE THEATRE @ the Alberta College of Art + Design.    Date: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 2017 @ 7PM

Anne J Steves is a visual artist working at the intersection of art/craft through textiles and thread based media. Her work examines the narratives of place and the ways in  which craft aesthetics can draw out connections between ourselves and the spaces (both constructed and natural) in which we dwell.

Steves’ work is often instigated by specific sites during artist residencies and independent travel, allowing for interaction with new conditions, communities and materials.

So far these have included a year in a Ranger Station, a collaborative canoe journey down the Rideau Canal, an exploration of string figure making in Victoria and a study of traditional wool blankets in Wales.

For more pictures and writings…    annejsteves.myportfolio.com/

This talk is presented in partnership with Contextural Fibre Arts Cooperative.

Fibre Events

 

The annual Fibre show is on display in the main mall until Friday, adiposity February
10th.

Madelaine Purves-Smith presents Custom Woolen Mills Thursday Feb 16 – 3pm
Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre

The miniature show is in rm. 371 this year. Bidding has started and closes
during our reception, epilepsy Thursday February 16th, 5:30-8pm, final bids- 7:30pm.

Hope to see many of you at our talk and closing reception,
The Fibre Program

Seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

2017 Mini poster

The ACAD Fibre program is seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

Funds raised support visiting artists, troche workshops and student-initiated projects in the Fibre program. Students, pilule alumni, ed faculty and friends are encouraged to donate work for the show.

Works restricted to 12” in any direction in all mediums will be accepted.

All work must be accompanied by a submission form and dropped off at the Fibre Program office, Rm 414 by Monday, January 30th, 2017.

The Miniature Show will be displayed from February 6 – 16th. The closing event will be held Thursday, February 16th from 5.30 – 8 pm in Room 371 with closing bids in at 7.30 pm.

For more information or a submission form contact kellie.reid@acad.ca or asma.ismail@acad.ca

 

Natural Dye Sampler

Fun Fun Fun!

On the weekend I was busy cooking up a variety of colours for a natural dye printing sampler. This sampler shows thirty colours and eleven different modifiers making for a grand total of three hundred and thirty circlers. The modifers include: Cream of Tartar, sick Soda Ash, information pills Citric Acid, store Alum and Iron. The natural dye colours include: Weld, Buckthorn, Chamomile, Golden Rod, Osage, Marigold, Gallnut, Sumac, Madder, Lac, Brazilwood, Logwood, Henna and Black Walnut. I mixed a variety of these saturate dye pastes together to get secondary colours. I also mixed various ratios of alum and iron paste together, this creates the darker grey colours that appear on the cloth below. I will be teaching an introduction to printing with natural dyes workshop next semester, so stay tuned if you are interested in signing up. I received a grant from ACAD to teach this workshop so there will be no costs to students!
14959095_10153925962222513_1689328196_o
Above is a shot of the dye colours before I’ve added the modifiers.

14971663_10153925962472513_1985322636_o
Above is a shot of the dye colours with the modifiers.

14958246_10153925961167513_546793051_o14958189_10153925960922513_909972978_o14954414_10153925960687513_355481719_o 14895448_10153925961557513_808284727_o 14881779_10153925961787513_299566876_o

-Caroline-

Printing Experiments

Breakdown and Polychromatic Printing with Natural Dyes!

For one of my projects I’ve been experimenting with two silk screen techniques called polychromatic and breakdown printing.

In polychromatic printing you use dye water to paint directly on the screen wait for the screen to dry then transfer your mark making/painting onto the cloth. You can get lovely textures from using different brushes and the marks appear light and watery. You can add multiple layers of dye water onto your screen but you must wait for your screen to completely dry before you add another layer. Adding multiple layers of dye colour will create brighter and more saturate results.

In breakdown printing you use thicken dye paste and paint directly onto your silk screen. You can play around with the thickness of your dye and add found textures like bubble wrap or lace. Let the screen dry overnight and then use it for printing the next day. Using the thicken dye pastes causes a resist on your screen. You can print about four or five times with the same screen before your thickened dye disappears.

Here are some process shots of printing from the weekend!

-Caroline-

14924089_10153925969747513_1205141038_o
14958125_10153925968262513_1817531121_o
14964132_10153925968007513_2071600732_o
14907885_10153925965467513_1986132621_o

14959073_10153925966507513_1664042339_o14895678_10153925967682513_1293158339_o14970854_10153925966162513_1652967437_o 14971587_10153925965632513_1681960291_o

“There must be a reason to dirt a fine, white cloth with print.” –Armi Ratia

ex-2013-marimekko-002

Armi Ratia, pregnancy founder and managing director of Marimekko. Photo: Teppo Lipasti, 1975
Source: https://www.textilemuseum.ca/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/marimekko,-with-love

Lately in my practice I’ve been thinking about what has influenced my interest and love for hand-printed textiles. While I was deep in my research and thoughts this weekend, I remembered the “Marimekko, With Love” show I was fortunate enough to attend in the winter of 2013. The show took place at the Textile Museum of Canada in Toronto, Ontario. The quote above popped into my head recently, reminding me of how much this show has had an impact on me, inspiring my work and my design philosophies to this day.

installation-view

Installation view (2013) Photo: Jill Kitchener
Source: https://www.textilemuseum.ca/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/marimekko,-with-love

The show was a retrospective look at the famed Finnish design company, Marimekko, founded by Armi Ratia and her husband Viljo in 1951 in Helsinki, Finland. The show explored Marimekko’s uniquely integrated design, manufacturing and marketing. The Toronto Star said the company’s focus was on “style, creative living and bright patterns in a society recovering from the Second World War.” Marimekko’s prints and patterns suited the emerging visual arts landscape of the 1950s and 60s.

The article also stated that “its designer Maija Isola, who created the classic poppy pattern, Unikko, often took cues from nature. Her Lokki design-think horizontal wavy lines- was inspired by a seagull’s shadow flying over water.”

Finding inspiration in one’s surrounding environment hits close to home.

ex-2013-marimekko-008

Installation view (2013) Photo: Jill Kitchener
Source: https://www.textilemuseum.ca/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/marimekko,-with-love

ex-2013-marimekko-004

Karelia (Front Street), opening party. Photo: Wollin Gustavs Kayari, c. 1960
Source: https://www.textilemuseum.ca/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/marimekko,-with-love

“Marimekko introduced boldness and experimentation that left an indelible imprint immediately,” says Shauna McCabe, executive director of the Textile Museum of Canada. “The founder, Armi Ratia, had an encompassing vision about the power of design in everyday life.”

Who wouldn’t fall for these bright, bold and powerful patterns?

petri_juslin_14_10-2014_marimekko_printdesign-final_lowres_dragen_

Printex printing mill in Helsinki.
Source: https://us.marimekko.com/unfold/the-story

To learn more about Marimekko’s history visit:

https://us.marimekko.com/unfold/the-story

-Caroline-

 

A Little Motivation

 

tgd04-leon_539c4da9-5d80-44ab-bf73-2875cc5ea5d9_grande

Source: “The Great Discontent Issue 4.” https://shop.thegreatdiscontent.com/products/the-great-discontent-issue-four. Web. Sept 5, glaucoma 2016.

This week I would like to share with you one of my favourite magazines… The Great Discontent.  

The Great Discontent (TGD) is a print and online magazine featuring inspiring, infertility in-depth conversations with today’s artists, health makers, and risk takers. TDG looks into the lives of its subjects through long-form interviews and short features, a podcast, a live event series and film-based projects. This magazine is published by Wayward Wild in New York City.

Print issues are available for purchase in TGD’s online shop and at retailers worldwide. In addition to print, they also publish new digital content on their website throughout the month. You can also purchase digital copies of all their magazines. I purchased their first magazine digitally a few years ago. Accessing the magazine on my computer and phone is a simple and enjoyable experience. I love googling the artists and viewing their websites while I read through the magazine.

Here’s a summary of what their printed issues cover:

Issue # 1

This issue features a collection of inspiring interviews loosely based around the theme of leaps. Their stories encourage, inspire, and challenge us to make the jump, even if—and especially when—we’re afraid.


Issue # 2

The theme of hustle implores us to reconsider the idea of making it—both how we do it and how we define it. This magazine is a reminder that more often than not, we must work hard to carve out a path to doing the work we love.

Issue # 3

Features those who have dared to push the boundaries of what is achievable.  Their stories will encourage you to explore your interests and overcome your fears, allowing you to discover what you’re truly capable of.

Issue # 4

Ambition is the theme of this issue, covering a selection of interviews with those who are committed to their crafts and pursuing their paths with a sense of purpose. Their stories will drive you to explore your ambitions and chase them with a renewed resolve.

Reading these interviews is a treat, and they help inform your practice at the same time. You can’t go wrong with TGD, it’s well worth your time. It is a great resource for any creative in any stage of their career.

I hope you enjoy reading TGD as much as I do.


-Caroline-

samantha-pleet-portrait-hannah-metz-hero

Source: “Samantha Pleet.” https://thegreatdiscontent.com/interview/samantha-pleet. Interview by Ryan and Tina Essmaker. Photograph by Hannah Kristina Metz. Web. March 24, 2015. 



The Mysterious Weaver: Helena Vento

While working on my transparent cotton weavings, public health I began to research artists who work in a similar way. This search was too specific in nature, and I had a difficult time uncovering artists working with the same concepts and processes as me. However, I did find Helena Vento. When searched, her name brought results of only her Pinterest page, where little information was given as to her work as an artist or how these pieces evolved.

The images included a caption simply stating that they are a transparent weave of linen. Despite the lack of further information, I was inspired by the subtle design of the weavings, the finishing of the edges, and the documentation in everyday spaces. These are the decisions that are most critical in making a weaving successful, and I feel that her weavings are presented very successfully.

                     

This work gave me something to think about as I continue to document my own weavings and strive to present them as successfully as possible.

-Marcia

Image Source/Helena’s Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/helenavento/textiles-by-helena-vento/

Congratulations Jane Kidd!

Congratulations to Jane Kidd, view this year’s recipient of the Saidye Bronfman award!

unnamed

The Governor General’s Awards in Visual and Media Arts were created in 1999 by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Governor General of Canada. Over the past 16 years, online the awards have celebrated Canada’s vibrant arts community and recognized remarkable careers in the visual and media arts.

In 2007, cough the Saidye Bronfman Award for excellence in the fine crafts (originally created in 1977) joined this prestigious family of awards. This ensures that Canada’s outstanding craft artists receive national recognition each year alongside their peers in the visual and media arts. The Canada Council has been administering the Saidye Bronfman Award since 1997.

Through the act of weaving, Jane Kidd, engages in a sensual process and employs a physical language to establish links with the viewer. Kidd appreciates that she is a participant in the continuum of its makers, the counterpoint it provides to modern life, and the hands-on materiality it embodies. She creates contemporary objects that convey a deep engagement with the natural world and draw our attention to our constantly renegotiated relationship with it.

Jane taught at the Alberta College of Art + Design in Calgary, Alberta from 1979 until 2010.

Laura Vickerson Interview – The Between – Exhibition at the Nickle Arts March 2016

contextural_logo

 

The deadline for applications is less than a week away! Submit your application by March 27th to be a participant in the 9th annual Contextural Self-directed Summer Residency and end of Residency exhibition.
We are seeking individuals who:

  • Are interested in working within a co-operative studio setting
  • Will be actively involved in, page
    and contribute to, pharm our community
  • Seek access to affordable studio space and specialized equipment
  • Are interested in sharing their knowledge and skills through teaching and collaboration
  • Appreciate and practice the diversity of textile arts and craft
  • Embrace an environmental approach to studio production
  • Are ready to commit a fee of $250 for a three-month, noun
    or $150 for one-month summer studio rental and access to equipment.
  • Will contribute to the end of summer residency exhibition.

Please visit – Contextural.ca for more information on our mission, vision, and values.

Residency Dates

One-month residencies are May 29 ? July 3 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm) and July 24 – 

August 28 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in on Sunday, July 24 at 1:00pm).

Three-month residency is May 29 – August 28 with mandatory attendance for orientation/move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm.

How To Apply – Please visit contextural.ca/residency-application for submission requirements.

Deadline for submissions is Sunday, March 27th @ midnight. If accepted, residency fees are due with the acceptance form and supply order form by May 1st.

Again this year, Contextural will be offering the Contextural Summer Residency Scholarship to individuals or members applying for the three-month residency. The scholarship includes studio fees for the three-month summer residency ($250 value) and $250 for supplies.

For questions regarding the summer residency, please direct them to us at residency@contextural.ca

 
Bill Morton is a Calgary-based artist and instructor at the Alberta College of Art + Design. His work is collected and shown in the United States, Hemorrhoids
Japan, women’s health
China and Canada. A graduate of the Alberta College of Art (1967), information pills
he studied in Japan from 1969 to 1983 including ten years apprenticing with a Master Dyer.

Katagami or Ise-katagami is the Japanese craft of making paper stencils for dyeing textiles. In this video Bill Morton introduces the materials and discusses the processes of cutting and backing the stencils, followed by a demonstration of their application in textile dyeing.


Bill Morton is a Calgary-based artist and instructor at the Alberta College of Art + Design. His work is collected and shown in the United States, disease
Japan, treat
China and Canada. A graduate of the Alberta College of Art (1967), he studied in Japan from 1969 to 1983 including ten years apprenticing with a Master Dyer.

Katagami or Ise-katagami is the Japanese craft of making paper stencils for dyeing textiles. In this video Bill Morton introduces the materials and discusses the processes of cutting and backing the stencils, followed by a demonstration of their application in textile dyeing.


The Between is a new site-specific installation by Vickerson, pulmonologist
combining her latest textile work with the collections of Nickle Galleries. A SERIES exhibition organized by Nickle Galleries, unhealthy curated by Michele Hardy.

Laura Vickerson’s practice has long been drawn from the stuff of life – discarded objects and materials that were at one time a part of everyday experiences. Through changing trends, rheumatologist
a general desire to consume, or the vagaries of fashion, things come to outlive their usefulness and quite often become obsolete or discarded. Yet these things also become artifacts of our time, re-presented by Vickerson to create underlying narratives that push the viewer to reconsider what was once familiar. Her materials serve as signifiers of the relationships and connections we have with the world around us and with one another – relationships that ultimately lie at the centre of her explorations.

Laura Vickerson is a multi-media installation artist and educator who lives and works in Calgary. She presently teaches at the Alberta College of Art & Design. She has exhibited extensively in Canada as well as in the U.S., Britain, Turkey, Poland and China. She has produced site-specific installations for various international exhibitions and venues including the Istanbul Biennial, le Manifestation Internationale d’Art de Quebec, as well as a project through Locus + titled “Fairytales and Factories” creating a work for an old Textiles mill in the Yorkshire Dales (Britain). She has participated in artist residencies at The Banff Centre for the Arts (Banff, Alberta) and the “Sympo-Fibres International” in Ste-Hyacinth, Quebec. She has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards through the Alberta Foundation for the Arts, The Canada Council for the Arts, Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the Arts Council of England.

Mireille Perron has been a practicing visual artist, writer, scholar, and educator for more than 30 years. Perron was born in Montréal, Québec. Since 1982, her installations have appeared in numerous solo and group exhibitions in Canada, Europe and the United States. She is the founder of the Laboratory of Feminist Pataphysics. LFP promotes social experiments that masquerade as artworks/events. Perron has published over eighty essays related to visual arts and craft practice in Canada and abroad. She has participated in several artist residencies, academic conferences as a guest speaker and as chair and co-chair (art and craft history/discourse, cultural studies) and lectured many times about her own artwork (Canada, U.S.A. and Europe.) Perron has also occasionally worked as a guest curator. Perron has been a member of ACAD Faculty since 1990.

 

Introduction to Ise-katagami – Japanese Paper Stencil Workshop

contextural_logo

 

The deadline for applications is less than a week away! Submit your application by March 27th to be a participant in the 9th annual Contextural Self-directed Summer Residency and end of Residency exhibition.
We are seeking individuals who:

  • Are interested in working within a co-operative studio setting
  • Will be actively involved in, page
    and contribute to, pharm our community
  • Seek access to affordable studio space and specialized equipment
  • Are interested in sharing their knowledge and skills through teaching and collaboration
  • Appreciate and practice the diversity of textile arts and craft
  • Embrace an environmental approach to studio production
  • Are ready to commit a fee of $250 for a three-month, noun
    or $150 for one-month summer studio rental and access to equipment.
  • Will contribute to the end of summer residency exhibition.

Please visit – Contextural.ca for more information on our mission, vision, and values.

Residency Dates

One-month residencies are May 29 ? July 3 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm) and July 24 – 

August 28 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in on Sunday, July 24 at 1:00pm).

Three-month residency is May 29 – August 28 with mandatory attendance for orientation/move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm.

How To Apply – Please visit contextural.ca/residency-application for submission requirements.

Deadline for submissions is Sunday, March 27th @ midnight. If accepted, residency fees are due with the acceptance form and supply order form by May 1st.

Again this year, Contextural will be offering the Contextural Summer Residency Scholarship to individuals or members applying for the three-month residency. The scholarship includes studio fees for the three-month summer residency ($250 value) and $250 for supplies.

For questions regarding the summer residency, please direct them to us at residency@contextural.ca

 
Bill Morton is a Calgary-based artist and instructor at the Alberta College of Art + Design. His work is collected and shown in the United States, Hemorrhoids
Japan, women’s health
China and Canada. A graduate of the Alberta College of Art (1967), information pills
he studied in Japan from 1969 to 1983 including ten years apprenticing with a Master Dyer.

Katagami or Ise-katagami is the Japanese craft of making paper stencils for dyeing textiles. In this video Bill Morton introduces the materials and discusses the processes of cutting and backing the stencils, followed by a demonstration of their application in textile dyeing.

Contextural Self-Directed Summer Residency Program – Deadline March 27

I’m no good at keeping up a blog on the internet. Call me old fashioned, price but I still like recording things in my sketch book. Actually, I like drawing, which is a form of recording something. Or the simple fact that if you encounter something interesting, like a exhibition, a show, or even a musical artist preforming, you can take the flyer and put it in your sketchbook, as well as any pictures you take. I remember as a art student in high school my art teacher said to make sure you were looking at other artists work, and I would always print them out and glue them into my sketch. I have probably over 10 sketchbooks all filled with drawings and memories.

My project seems to be going well. Its kind of consumed me. I would love to take a full day off to work on it but unfortunately my boss is in Scotland and I cant. She gets back the 28th, so I booked off the 29th which is the day before my photo shoot. Her vacation and my project deadline have aligned pretty terribly.

– Chelsey Wensveen
contextural_logo

 

The deadline for applications is less than a week away! Submit your application by March 27th to be a participant in the 9th annual Contextural Self-directed Summer Residency and end of Residency exhibition.
We are seeking individuals who:

  • Are interested in working within a co-operative studio setting
  • Will be actively involved in, about it
    and contribute to, our community
  • Seek access to affordable studio space and specialized equipment
  • Are interested in sharing their knowledge and skills through teaching and collaboration
  • Appreciate and practice the diversity of textile arts and craft
  • Embrace an environmental approach to studio production
  • Are ready to commit a fee of $250 for a three-month, or $150 for one-month summer studio rental and access to equipment.
  • Will contribute to the end of summer residency exhibition.

Please visit – Contextural.ca for more information on our mission, vision, and values.

Residency Dates

One-month residencies are May 29 ? July 3 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm) and July 24 – 

August 28 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in on Sunday, July 24 at 1:00pm).

Three-month residency is May 29 – August 28 with mandatory attendance for orientation/move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm.

How To Apply – Please visit contextural.ca/residency-application for submission requirements.

Deadline for submissions is Sunday, March 27th @ midnight. If accepted, residency fees are due with the acceptance form and supply order form by May 1st.

Again this year, Contextural will be offering the Contextural Summer Residency Scholarship to individuals or members applying for the three-month residency. The scholarship includes studio fees for the three-month summer residency ($250 value) and $250 for supplies.

For questions regarding the summer residency, please direct them to us at residency@contextural.ca

 

Idea Exchange

I stumbled upon this organization called Idea Exchange while researching Canadian art galleries.  What’s unique about Idea Exchange is that they have a database of their fibre arts collection, tadalafil which can be accessed online:

https://ideaexchange.org/art/fibre-art-collection

You can browse the collection by region, price type, this site materials, techniques and date, allowing you to find artists and work that may be similar to your own practice. For example, I input a search for Type: Sculpture and Material: Steel Wire and discovered the work of artist Arounna Khounnoraj. Give it a try and see what you find!

Scott-Lee-(1)-web

Arouanna Khounnoraj, Untitled Dwelling Series #1, 1998

-Madison

Image courtesy the website

Yarn Box

This semester I am taking a painting class. For the second project I had researched artist Lydia Gifford and applied three of her themes to my piece. This included monochromatic materials, try
layering and challenging traditional methods of painting in combination with sculptural aspects. Here I was able to reverse my artistic practice, which is usually deconstructing painting through colour, to the use of paint with very tactile materials.
I have many many, Sildenafil
many things. I am grateful to be able to take a cab tomorrow morning. I want to be early, like get there for 7am, so I can put rust on my shirts, because that needs to be done. Even though I have many things I feel like nothing is 100% done and everything is sitting at a solid half doneness. I feel like this is a large project for me and that is exciting. Although, it almost got ruined when my pipes decided to leak all over the place, because, of course, I was keeping my suitcase of work right where the pipes decided to leak.

I have to give  a half hour talk on Friday for the FINA class and that is not exciting. Mainly my talk will be about bricolage and how I use it in wearable artworks. I dont like talking very much, especially public talking in front of a group of people. I think I will bring up artists like Nick Cave and the fellow that bricolages golf bags (I’ll have to look him up again when I get home from work), and anyone else I can think of.

– Chelsey Wensveen

 
I have many many, neurosurgeon
many things. I am grateful to be able to take a cab tomorrow morning. I want to be early, like get there for 7am, so I can put rust on my shirts, because that needs to be done. Even though I have many things I feel like nothing is 100% done and everything is sitting at a solid half doneness. I feel like this is a large project for me and that is exciting. Although, it almost got ruined when my pipes decided to leak all over the place, because, of course, I was keeping my suitcase of work right where the pipes decided to leak.

I have to give  a half hour talk on Friday for the FINA class and that is not exciting. Mainly my talk will be about bricolage and how I use it in wearable artworks. I dont like talking very much, especially public talking in front of a group of people. I think I will bring up artists like Nick Cave and the fellow that bricolages golf bags (I’ll have to look him up again when I get home from work), and anyone else I can think of.

– Chelsey Wensveen

 
This year for Christmas one of my favourite gifts my mom gave to me was a three month subscription to a company called Yarn Box.

They have four different subscriptions you can choose from:

Yarn Box Socks which is the cheapest subscription, recipe you usually get enough wool to knit a pair of socks this also includes a pattern.

Yarn Box Classic which is what I have been getting. My first project I got enough wool to knit a shawl and my second project was a knit plush kitten toy pattern. They also give crochet patterns with this subscription.

Screen Shot 2016-03-08 at 10.43.59 AM

Screen Shot 2016-03-08 at 10.43.41 AM

Yarn Box Luxe is a seasonal subscription so only 4 a year. You get a lot of wool in this package its one of the most expensive ones but you get really interesting fibres. This also includes a pattern.

And the last one is called Yarn Box Art Yarns this one is also seasonal and more expensive but you get a lot of wool and really interesting fibres.

Im really happy with what I have been getting I would recommend this to anyone who likes to knit or crochet. There is usually up to 5 different color-ways for each month and they are all usually pretty nice. When you sign up you get to customize what colours and yarn weights you like so they can try and match up the best yarn for you.

 

-Nicole

 

 

Next Page »