In Miniature | Lyn Pfleuger + Lindsay Joy

Laura Vickerson | Excess Baggage | 20 x 20 cm
Jane Kidd | Thaw | 30 x 15 cm

Miniatures by Laura Vickerson and Jane Kidd on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Closing bids tomorrow night at 830 pm following an artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga. Hope to see you there!

Lyn Pfleuger | Pull Here | dimensions variable

Lindsay Joy | Call Girl | 10 x 6 cm

Miniatures by Lyn Pfleuger and Lindsay Joy on exhibition at the Alberta College of Art & Design March 8 to 17 as part of the Fibre Program’s “Fibre Fortnight” Miniature Show and Silent Auction. Join us tonight for a reception from 5 to 7 pm, tadalafil
artist talk by Marjolein Dallinga at 7 pm. Bids for silent auction items close at 830pm. Hope to see you there!

Fibre Fortnight is Here!

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Just a reminder, viagra the opening reception for Jennifer Akkermans show “Terrarium” is TONIGHT!
Thursday, March 3 @ the +15 Stride window space in the Epcore centre 7pm.
Don’t miss it!

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Its that time of year again…Fibre Fortnight! The exhibition in the main mall is looking great. Thank you to all who came down and lent a hand. The Miniature Show and Silent Auction is also coming along well with over fifty submissions from students, online alumni and faculty (THANK YOU EVERYONE!) this could be the best one yet! Bidding starts tomorrow so sharpen your pencils… Thanks to Jessica Armstrong, ambulance
Brittney Reum and Vickie Lam for all of your work on organizing this important Fibre Program fundraiser that will support our visiting artist program, student initiated events and the graduating class.

DATES TO REMEMBER + SHARE WITH YOUR FRIENDS (all events are at ACAD)

Fibre Fortnight Exhibition, March 8 to 18, 2011 in the ACAD Main Mall

Thursday March 10
Opening Reception from 530 to 900 pm

Thursday March 17
Visiting Artist Talk by Marjolein Dallinga at 700 pm in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre
Closing Reception from 500 to 700 pm
Minitature Silent Auction Closing Bids 830 pm

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All events are open to the public. Hope to see you there…

ACAD SHOW + SALE: Tips for successful selling

4993396837_153759c90d_zVERAMEAT @ Renegade Craft Chicago

Hey guys, thumb Andrea here, skincare some of you may have heard me speak this past monday on tips for selling your work. I’m a full time designer making handbags. You can see my work here www.hoakonloveshelga.com. I started out the same way many of you are doing now, i.e.. selling at show and sale. This was my first experience in to selling my work and a great way to see what people think!

I’ve included 3 main tips here to help you prepare for the upcoming show and sale:

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Urban Posture via Renegade Craft

1. PRICING: This is always something hard to figure out in the beginning. If each piece is completely different, take the time to sit down and list out all the costs it took to make each piece. This will get you in a good habit of doing this down the road for everything. Include all materials (ex. yarn, dyes, needles, thread, paint, notions, etc etc.), gas if you had to drive to get it, packaging and anything else you can think of. The total for this is your Cost of Goods (COGs). Also figure out how long it took for you to make this piece, including your trip to get supplies or any other time it took. You may not be able to factor all your time in to pricing just yet, but it’s always good to know exactly how long it really takes to make something. Over time things will not take nearly as long to make. It used to take me a whole day to make one bag when I first started out! Whatever you sell your work for minus your Cost of Goods and any ACAD fees will be your profit.

There are several ways you can now price out your work. You can multiply your COG’s by 2x’s or 3x’s OR I recommend first doing some research of other designers/artists doing something similar. Google and Etsy are great for this. Find out how much they are selling it for and see how much they are actually selling! There is a fine line when it comes to pricing, if you over price you may not sell as much, and if you under price people tend to think there is something wrong and will undervalue your work as well. This may take some time for you to figure out. Be patient. If you aren’t as successful at your first show and sale, don’t give up! Reassess your pricing strategy and products for the next show. I am still constantly doing this after each show and I’ve been doing this for 7 years now!

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Friends Again + Shy But Interested

2. PACKAGING/MARKETING

– Everyone needs a business card! Even if it just has an email address, description of your work. and your name on it! Everyone needs one beside their work! The great thing about Show and Sale is that people from all over the city go there specifically to support local young artists. Most are willing to spend! Make sure if they have a way to contact you afterwards if they are not wanting to purchase just yet! www.Vistaprint.ca is very affordable. You can get 250 business cards for free plus shipping. Usually mine work out to appx 20 cents a card or something like that but take time to arrive so order in advance. Be sure to take some time to make sure your card looks proffessional and inviting. This is the thing that people will hold on to regarding your work. If it doesn’t look appealing they will form the same opinion on your work.

– Take some time to really think about how your work is packaged and displayed. Clean and professional are always the best route to go. If something is too visually busy (ex. too many scarves piled in a bin) sometimes people will not want to look through. Think visually neat and orderly… your packaging is just as important as your work itself.

– A great place to get some visual inspiration is through the Renegade craft flickr site. Going to thrift stores to find display items is always a good way to cut down on costs and find some unusual items, or visit locally http://www.wrdisplay.ca for mannequins, stands, racks, paper bags, etc etc. They are awesome and have pretty much everything you need.

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Fernworks via renegade craft

3. TALK TO CUSTOMERS I know this is hard when you have class, but the busiest times of show and sale are after work and on the weekend so you should have no excuse. Be present and near your work, talk to the customers, see what they pick up and don’t pick up. This is a great way to hear feedback from people and learn where you can make improvements. It may be something simple like color options. Maybe your display is not working too well. You wouldn’t know this unless you actually saw customers looking at it. I always made a point to stick around for majority of the Show and Sale. I think it’s very important to have people be able to see and talk to you as the artist, and it’s also a lot of fun!

I hope this helps!

Best of luck to all of you with the upcoming show! I’m wishing you a lot of success and sales!

I’m hoping to make this a regular series to help you guys with the business end of selling your work. If you have any specific topics you are interested in me covering on the FIBRE BLOG, please let Tara know and I will be happy to help. Or feel free to email me at info@hoakonhelga.com

Cheers,

Andrea

Dont forget to vote!

STUDENTS

Coming soon… submit your website or blog today! Email tara.griffiths@acad.ca

FACULTY

Jane Kidd   WEBSITE

Mackenzie Frère   WEBSITE | BLOG

ALUMNI

Contextural   WEBSITE

Stefanie Wong   BLOG

Suzen Green   WEBSITE | BLOG

FIBRE ARTS RELATED WEBSITES

Sri Threads

FIBRE ARTS RELATED BLOGS

Feminist Artist Advice Column

SUPPLIERS

The Fibre Department does not specifically endorse the following vendors. Do your research before ordering any materials and shop with care.

Aubusson House | Calgary, prothesis
AB | fine wool yarns, help
some suitable for tapestry

Custom Woolen Mills | Linden, AB | wool yarns, fibre for felting

Habu Textiles | New York, NY | fine yarns in exotic fibres, silk degumming powder

Leclerc Looms | Plessisville, PQ | Looms and weaving equipment

Maiwa | Vancouver, BC | equipment, synthetic + natural dyes, mordants

Maurice Brassard et Fils | Plessisville, PQ | yarns

The Papertrail | Windsor, ON | papermaking materials and equipment

Shuttleworks | Okotoks, AB | yarns, equipment, synthetic + natural dyes, mordants

Treenway Silks | Salt Spring Island, BC | silk yarns and fibres

Hello ACAD Faculty and Students!
I am sure you are fully aware of the Civic Election that is currently
taking place.  I am writing this email to raise awareness for an easy
opportunity for employees and students of ACAD to vote.  On Wednesday, sick 
October 13 from 12:00 to 7:00 pm, find  an advanced poll is happening at the
Residence Tower at SAIT. Anyone can vote at this station no matter where
you live in Calgary.
Voting in elections is incredibly important. We are very fortunate to
have such a right in Canada and I would encourage you all to participate.
To be eligible to vote you must:
- Be over 18
- Be a Canadian citizen
- Have lived in ALBERTA for six months
- Live in Calgary on the day of election *(this includes students living
in residence)
- Bring one piece of government issued ID
Information on each of the candidates can be found here and on their
individual websites:
http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/election/index.html or
www.CalgaryPolitics.com
Also, the "official" voting day is on Monday, October 18. On that day you
must vote in your ward. To find a voting station that you can vote at on
the 18th, visit:
http://www.calgary.ca/portal/server.pt/gateway/PTARGS_0_0_780_237_0_43/http%3B/content.calgary.ca/CCA/City+Hall/Business+Units/City+Clerks+Department/Election+and+Information+Services/2010+General+Election/Where+do+I+vote.htm
More information on the election process can be found at:
www.calgary.ca/election
Make an informed decision and do not forget to vote!

Unravelling the Yarns: War Rugs and Soldiers

On Saturday I visited Calgary’s Military Museums to see Unravelling the Yarns: War Rugs and Soldiers, artificial an exhibition of War Rugs from the Fyke Collection of Afghan War Rugs curated by Dr. Michele Hardy. The rugs were donated to the Nickle Arts Museum by Robert Fyke, for sale a dear friend who passed away in 2009. It was good to see some of the rugs from this incredible collection again.Robert was a passionate and outspoken collector of war rugs who enjoyed sharing the story of these fascinating textiles with his friends and colleagues. A digital version of the entire collection has recently become available along with resources for further research.

In the new exhibit at The Founder’s Galery, the rugs are shown alongside artifacts from the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Museum and Archives. The pairing of an AK-47 or hand grenade with its woven analog provides not only a context for these uniquely contemporary textiles, but also lends a sobriety and grave reality to the imagery contained in the rugs.

In her statement for the exhibition, Millitary Museums’ Art Curator Colleen Sharp writes, “Few rugs woven by tribal people today reflect contemporary experiences in their narratives, yet these rugs offer a first person perspective of war as told by their Afghan weavers.” It is for this fact, I feel that the rugs have such a powerful story to tell. The inherent paradox of violent imagery and themes woven into a rug, an article of domestic comfort or religious expression (some are in fact used in prayer), gives wordless expression to the horrific incursion of violence into the daily lives of the weavers and their families.

Unravelling the Yarns: War Rugs and Soldiers continues at The Founder’s Gallery in The Millitary Museums until January 31, 2011. For admission info and hours Click HERE

The entrance to the Founder’s Gallery also features Canopy, by Toronto artist Penelope Stewart. The work “…features a tiled pattern photographed and screened onto thirty feet of organza fabric. The ghostly pattern evokes remembrance and is derived from detail on the University of Toronto memorial to soldiers lost in the world wars.” (Curated by Colleen Sharpe, Art Curator with the Founders’ Gallery.)

posted by: Mackenzie

Jasmine Valentina Herron Memorial at ACAD

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Alumni Siri McCormick has recently been working on a project with Cam Christiansen from Anlanda Digital Studio making costumes for Cam’s newest animation project. The catch, otolaryngologist the costumes aren’t visible in the final project. Cam uses green screens to create digitally animated video. Actors then come in, information pills are filmed, the green background is then taken out of the frame digitally and replaced with another background that is either filmed or drawn digitally. But what if you could replace more than just the background? How could you replace some of the props? Paint. How could you replace the actors outfits? Enter Siri, who has made outfits in the specific shade of blue and green which allows Cam to go in post production and replace the clothing with some wild animated patterns. The end result…

Click here to see some test screens.
For more information about the project and Anlanda Digital Studio – visit Cam’s site www.anlanda.com
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For more on this event, ed
visit the facebook page “Celebrating Jasmine Valentina Herron

Knit pick: How to look for work in the big city

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As promised for Mackenzie’s Fibre 3D class, ampoule here is the link to photographer Ari Versluis and profiler Ellie Uyttenbroek’s WEBSITE

Photographer Ari Versluis and profiler Ellie Uyttenbroek have worked together since October 1994. Inspired by a shared interest in the striking dress codes of various social groups, health they have systematically documented numerous identities over the last 16 years. Rotterdam’s heterogeneous, multicultural street scene remains a major source of inspiration for Ari Versluis and Ellie Uyttenbroek, although since 1998 they have also worked in many cities abroad.

They call their series Exactitudes: a contraction of exact and attitude. By registering their subjects in an identical framework, with similar poses and a strictly observed dress code, Versluis and Uyttenbroek provide an almost scientific, anthropological record of people’s attempts to distinguish themselves from others by assuming a group identity. The apparent contradiction between individuality and uniformity is, however, taken to such extremes in their arresting objective-looking photographic viewpoint and stylistic analysis that the artistic aspect clearly dominates the purely documentary element.

Wim van Sinderen, Senior Curator Museum of Photography, The Hague

CALGARY – EPCOR CENTRE for the Performing Arts is proud to partner with Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival 2010 in presenting How to Look for Work in the Big City, sales
a tongue-in-cheek performance examining the overworked employee in the economic boom of the New West.

Montreal-based artists Suzen Green and Ryan Statz make themselves at home in the LEDGE Gallery and create clothing with balls of yarn and knitting needles while the public has access to view the work in progress.

Statz will don the finished work and continue the performance outside of the home-like haven of the Gallery and enter the daunting working world, walking the pavement of Calgary.

The Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival (M:ST) is a biennial festival that celebrates innovative and critically engaged performative art in the Southern Alberta region.

As part of its mandate, EPCOR CENTRE provides visual arts opportunities to the Calgary art community and showcases a wide variety of Visual and Media Arts forms with artists from diverse backgrounds.

How to Look for Work in the Big City

Location: EPCOR CENTRE’s Ledge Gallery (+15 Centre Court)

Performance Times:

Saturday, October 9 – 10am – 4pm

Monday, October 11 – 10am – 4pm

Tuesday, October 12 – 10am – 4pm

Wednesday, October 13 – 10am – 4pm

Dressing of the Artist: Thursday, October 14 – 12pm

Closing reception: Thursday, October 14 – 4pm

Art created during performance will be exhibited from October 15 – 28

CALGARY – EPCOR CENTRE for the Performing Arts is proud to partner with Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival 2010 in presenting How to Look for Work in the Big City, youth health
a tongue-in-cheek performance examining the overworked employee in the economic boom of the New West.

Montreal-based artists Suzen Green and Ryan Statz make themselves at home in the LEDGE Gallery and create clothing with balls of yarn and knitting needles while the public has access to view the work in progress.

Statz will don the finished work and continue the performance outside of the home-like haven of the Gallery and enter the daunting working world, walking the pavement of Calgary.

The Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival (M:ST) is a biennial festival that celebrates innovative and critically engaged performative art in the Southern Alberta region.

As part of its mandate, EPCOR CENTRE provides visual arts opportunities to the Calgary art community and showcases a wide variety of Visual and Media Arts forms with artists from diverse backgrounds.

How to Look for Work in the Big City

Location: EPCOR CENTRE’s Ledge Gallery (+15 Centre Court)

Performance Times:

Saturday, October 9 – 10am – 4pm

Monday, October 11 – 10am – 4pm

Tuesday, October 12 – 10am – 4pm

Wednesday, October 13 – 10am – 4pm

Dressing of the Artist: Thursday, October 14 – 12pm

Closing reception: Thursday, October 14 – 4pm

Art created during performance will be exhibited from October 15 – 28

CALGARY – EPCOR CENTRE for the Performing Arts is proud to partner with Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival 2010 in presenting How to Look for Work in the Big City, viagra a tongue-in-cheek performance examining the overworked employee in the economic boom of the New West.

Montreal-based artists Suzen Green and Ryan Statz make themselves at home in the LEDGE Gallery and create clothing with balls of yarn and knitting needles while the public has access to view the work in progress.

Statz will don the finished work and continue the performance outside of the home-like haven of the Gallery and enter the daunting working world, refractionist
walking the pavement of Calgary.

The Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival (M:ST) is a biennial festival that celebrates innovative and critically engaged performative art in the Southern Alberta region.

As part of its mandate, EPCOR CENTRE provides visual arts opportunities to the Calgary art community and showcases a wide variety of Visual and Media Arts forms with artists from diverse backgrounds.

How to Look for Work in the Big City

Location: EPCOR CENTRE’s Ledge Gallery (+15 Centre Court)

Performance Times:

Saturday, October 9 – 10am – 4pm

Monday, October 11 – 10am – 4pm

Tuesday, October 12 – 10am – 4pm

Wednesday, October 13 – 10am – 4pm

Dressing of the Artist: Thursday, October 14 – 12pm

Closing reception: Thursday, October 14 – 4pm

Art created during performance will be exhibited from October 15 – 28

CALGARY – EPCOR CENTRE for the Performing Arts is proud to partner with Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival 2010 in presenting How to Look for Work in the Big City, epidemic
a tongue-in-cheek performance examining the overworked employee in the economic boom of the New West.

Montreal-based artists Suzen Green and Ryan Statz make themselves at home in the LEDGE Gallery and create clothing with balls of yarn and knitting needles while the public has access to view the work in progress.

Statz will don the finished work and continue the performance outside of the home-like haven of the Gallery and enter the daunting working world, cheapest
walking the pavement of Calgary.

The Mountain Standard Time Performative Art Festival (M:ST) is a biennial festival that celebrates innovative and critically engaged performative art in the Southern Alberta region.

As part of its mandate, EPCOR CENTRE provides visual arts opportunities to the Calgary art community and showcases a wide variety of Visual and Media Arts forms with artists from diverse backgrounds.

How to Look for Work in the Big City

Location: EPCOR CENTRE’s Ledge Gallery (+15 Centre Court)

Performance Times:

Saturday, October 9 – 10am – 4pm

Monday, October 11 – 10am – 4pm

Tuesday, October 12 – 10am – 4pm

Wednesday, October 13 – 10am – 4pm

Dressing of the Artist: Thursday, October 14 – 12pm

Closing reception: Thursday, October 14 – 4pm

Art created during performance will be exhibited from October 15 – 28

Regalia – A Wearable Art Performance

Regalia

Artist: Amy Malbeuf. Models: Amy Malbeuf, anorexia Georgia Lee. Photo: Ashleigh Amber Moore.

Artist: Jennifer Akkermans. Model: Matt Hartnett. Photo: Ashleigh Amber Moore.

I’d like to personally invite everyone to our wearable art performance, Regalia, this Thursday, November 5th, at Art Central.  As it’s First Thurday, and Art Central’s Fifth Birthday, there will be all kinds of things going on, stating at 5 and going until 9.  The Regalia show will be in the main space at 8PM.  The artists include: Jennifer Akkermans, Leo Casuga Jr., Anna Cunningham, Sara Girletz, Samantha Huskisson, Lindsay Joy, Laura Kelly, Georgia Lee, Amy Malbeuf, Ashleigh Amber Moore, Ashley Q., Brittney Reum, Tracy Sutherland, Jodie Stevens, Rebecca Taylor, Chantel Traub, Nick Ward, and Barbara Worden, under instructor, Dee Fontans.

As always, First Thursday is a free event at Art Central.  For more information, go to http://artcentral.ca.

Hope to see you all there!

Jennifer

Judy Chicago in Calgary?

exhibit_index_feature_fall_2009Living legend of feminist art, bulimics Judy Chicago’s place on the landscape of contemporary textile practice is a significant one. Best known for her groundbreaking sculptural installation, The Dinner Party (1974-1979), Chicago has spent decades exploring the possibilities of “thread as brushstroke.” This exhibition surveys some of Chicago’s most important contributions in cloth, highlighting both key and lesser-known works dating from 1971 to present. From macramé to needle point to airbrushed quilts, Chicago employs “technique as content” in her major projects selected for this survey exhibition including the Birth Project(1980-1985), the Holocaust Project (1993) and Resolutions: A Stitch in Time (1994 to present). This exhibition centralizes the labour-intensive nature of Chicago’s textile work as a metaphor for investing in the ideas, values, histories and provocations in her artwork. (text taken from Textile Museum of Canada website)

The most recent work from Judy Chicago is indeed here in Calgary and can be seen at the Art Gallery of Calgary (thanks in part to the Textile Museum of Canada) from Friday, September 25, 2009 – Saturday, January 23, 2010.

The exhibition entitled “If Women Ruled the World: Judy Chicago in Thread” opens this Friday, September 25 | 7-10pm and is followed over the next few months with programing, artist talks and fibre arts demonstrations.

To register or buy tickets any Art Gallery of Calgary programing please contact: Jaime Brett Sine | Manager, Public and Education Programs
T: 403.770.1358 E: j-bsine@artgallerycalgary.org

Unfortunately, if you don’t already have tickets to Judy Chicago’s talk on Sept. 29 you are too late – it has been sold out.