2014 Miniature Show Silent Auction + Exhibition

Bronwyn Schuster is a young Canadian artist whose work spans several mediums. She primarily paints, troche and within the past year has been involved with an artist residency in Quebec, dentist and is attending The Swedish Academy of Realist Art. Her works touches upon several subjects, including self portraiture, and work that can be described as fantastical. She has created jewelry, art dolls, paintings large and small, commercial work, and is an avid member of several art scenes.

The Scarf- Self Portrait (Bronwyn Schuster, 2013)

(Question) How would you describe yourself as an artist?

(Answer) First question and you’ve already stumped me. I figure a lot of the artist I am is still trapped inside of me, as I lack some of the skills to express what it is that I imagine. I also don’t really know where me begins and artist ends. Mostly though, I am a tea drinking, generally happy, slightly ethereal, wannabe realist painter who uses surrealism far to much as a crutch when things go wrong.

The Swedish Academy of Realist Art                           Photo credit: Bronwyn Schuster

What is the school you are attending, and why did you choose to go there?

The Swedish Academy of Realist (aka SARA {aka Atelier Stockholm}) is a magical school that will pull at the heartstrings of any golden age nostalgist. SARA is built on the tradition of European fine arts ateliers where master painters would take on apprentices, teaching them techniques through a rigid academic approach to figure drawing and painting. Quite simply, we spend the days hunched over Charles Bargue lithographs, copying line for line and shade for shade is precise detail. This is broken up in the day with live model drawing, anatomy and materials lectures. After graduating from lithographs you move onto copying casts, then onto oil painting and still lifes. It’s a three year course, and 8 hour days. Possibly the most intensive immersion into fine arts you could find. Which is precisely why I chose to attend. There is something still striking and haunting about the oil paintings of old. They were true masters of their technique, and it’s not something you can learn at just any school. At SARA I know I am learning in relatively the same fashion that the masters did themselves, and I can even trace the lineage of my teachers (it goes back to Leonardo da Vinci!) I am a pure romanticist too. I really couldn’t imagine attending any other kind of school.

Inspired- Egon Schiele (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

What inspires or influences your different styles? For example, what inspired your Animal Magnetism series, and your self portrait series?

My inspirations are in a constant flux and change. At the moment I have noticed a strong influence from my fellow classmates, and at the same time the Swedish style of living. But, I find it difficult to explain my inspiration because I am such a visual person. You’ll just have to come over for tea so that I can show you. I can, however, explain how my self portrait series came about. One fine winter morning, out in the prairies of Saskatchewan, I found myself very frustrated with my particular art skill level and inability to paint portraits. This was the time before I had means to attend SARA, so I took it upon myself to research up artists I admired, delve into their life story and then try to replicate their style. I figured trying to mimic their techniques would teach me something, and choosing to paint myself gave me both 24/7 access to a live model (who I did not have to impress) and it insured that I wasn’t directly copying a painters art work. Thus my “Inspired By” self portrait series was born. I may have also had some influence by my photographer friend Susan Knight who had started a similar project in digital media. The animal people though? I can’t explain that. I have no clue where that came from …

Red Riding Hood (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Have you ever experienced artists’ block? What do you do to counter it?

Ah, artists block. I know you well. Artist block comes in many forms for me. There is technical artist block for starters. It’s when I’ve got the ideas, the subject, the materials and everything in front of me, and then I start working and EVERYTHING feels wrong. No matter what I do, I can’t replicate what I see in front of me or in my mind. It might be the most frustrating form of artists block for me. Usually it happens right on a huge learning curve, and you just have to power through it. But sometimes it’s good to take a break. Make something nice to drink and try again later. Generally I have to remember that it is not as bad as I think it is. Creative artists block usually happens due to lack of sleep. That’s when I rest and let the pressure go. If it lasts more than two days, then I’m just being lazy. Creativity is a muscle. You have to exercise it. Try new things. Write. Research, and have interesting conversations with people. Last of all artists blocks is procrastination. This one is sneaky. It comes in the form of “But I need to do this first!” Be that: make food, finish a chapter of a book, check facebook, do your taxes, organize something, go to the store, research something, watch a youtube video (who are you trying to kid). These are not important (okay, maaaybe food and taxes are) always put aside time for art and always use that time for art. As my friend Vincent always likes to say “What do we say to the god of unproductivity? … Not today!”

Artist block is not a valid excuse. Go make some art!

Inspired- Leonor Fini (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Bronwyn’s artwork et al can be found here: http://bronwynschuster.com/

 

-Emmelia Taylor

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, pharm
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 

The Reparative Impulse

 

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, tadalafil
but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

I found this and had to share it – especially for anyone else who is going through the “fourth year-final semester” angst. This kinda just says it all for me – and is a bit apropos for the readings that we are doing in Fibre 451, pilule
Grad class.

Hemorrhoids
Sept. 23, 2013″ src=”http://fibre.acadnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Sartre-Recipes-New-Yorker-470×422.jpeg” width=”470″ height=”422″ /> New Yorker Magazine, Sept. 23, 2013

 

Pick a pencil. Any pencil. Are you sure that is the right one? Maybe a pen.Or a brush. Grab some paper. What colour paper? Maybe you want a canvas. Or try organza. What colour warp? But are you sure you want to weave this? Take another look. What about mixed media for that. How do you know? etc.

lol. Christine

 

 

 

 
2014 MiniatureHello ACAD Community, read more

The annual Miniature Show Silent Auction and Exhibition is calling for submissions!

The Miniature Show will be exhibited as part of Fibre Fortnight March 10th-21st, cheap in the Main Mall. The silent auction will run until Thursday the 20th, physician
final bids at 6:30pm. All proceeds from the auction will be donated to Fibre Department for funding visiting artists and student enrichment.

Submitted artworks must be of 12”x12″x12″ or smaller, of any medium and subject matter. Artworks are accepted from all departments, students, faculty and alumni.

To submit work please email the title, medium, size, artist name, and a short description of any details by February 28th. All artwork can be delivered to the Fibre Department March 10th -14th.

Please email submissions to Natalie Lauchlan at natalie.lauchlan@acad.ca

Cheers,

The Fibre Department

Knitting at the Kensington Pub – Tonight!

Be a part of the Interpurl Knitwork!

The Interpurl Knitwork is an exciting art project based on the connections we
make with social media.Women have always come together to create useful works of art for their
communities while socializing. Quilting bees and knitting circles were once one
of the main forums for social interaction in many communities.

I want to show how social media can be a community where women come together to socialize and knit!

To start to the project we are meeting
at the Kensington Pub on Wednesday, one health January 23, viagra 100mg from 6-9.
Bring your knitting – or there will be extra there – also people to teach you if you don’t know how.

Anyone who is interested in this project will knit one square 6″- 8″ any colour
and any material – what you have on hand is good – and send it to me by February
8, 2013.

Invite anyone and everyone via any media you use, the more the merrier! We hope
to create a huge blanket, symbolizing the power of women united through social
media all over the world. This blanket will be a part of a submission to
Interventions at the Banff Centre at the end of February.

With your square please include :
Your first name
Where you live
Who invited you to the Interpurl Knitwork
How they invited you (email, text, facebook, twitter, etc)
Three words which describe your feelings about participating in this project
Pin the paper to your square and send it to:

Elisa’s Studio Rm 380, ACAD

or:

Interpurl Knitwork
#229- 1104- 1240- Kensington Rd. NW
Calgary, AB Canada T2N 4X7

Facebook Event:https://www.facebook.com/events/397785386977630/?fref=ts
Twitter:https://twitter.com/Interpurl

 

Jessica Fischer

This semester I am engaging in some process based work once again. I have set out to crochet  chain a kind of cellular netting the size of my body. Loops or ‘cells’ are created  by attaching the chain back on itself, unhealthy creating a kind of regular irregularity in terms of their sizes.

Once completed this will create a kind of interface between viewer and whatever is on the other side, opisthorchiasis engaging the senses. I hope to also connect this ‘fabric’ to memory through use of imagery, case and the idea of memories being ingrained in our bodies and our senses.

This repetitive, meditative motion becomes part of the process of the hand, not necessarily needing mental thought to take place. It becomes a kind of tacit knowledge. In my readings I have come across a quote by David Michael Levin which embodies this notion quite well; “there is a maintaining of thought which is rooted in the work of the hands…thinking not as a cognitive process but as something bodily…” (Horne), process as part of the body.

This process takes time, and I am consistently trying to keep up with a schedule that will allow me to get the length I desire by the end of the semester. I am almost 1/2 way there!

-Sabrina

Horne, Stephen. “Sometimes Minimal.” Abandon building: Selected Writings on Art 1992-2006. Montreal: 11 Press, 2006. 11-17. Print.
For those of you who don’t know, web
Jessica Fischer is a forth year fibre major. She often works with found materials and themes surrounding decay and remnants. Her work has an authentic truth, prosthetic
reflective of human experience. I interviewed Jessica about her studio practice:

Who do you make your work for? (Do you need/want people to know about it?)

I make my work for myself as well as for an audience that will hopefully be affected in some way by what I do. I would prefer to have people know about it, although I sometimes get scared thinking of what might happen if I release ‘this baby’ into the world.

How does your creative process work? 

I get thoughts that sound like my thoughts, but aren’t. I get taken over by an intense feeling as if I am dipping into an invisible current; I ‘hear’ sentences  or a powerful word, or I ‘see’ an image that I need to write about right away (or else it’s gone forever). I need time to gestate any physically realized work into being, as most creative inspiration for me comes from a need for personal growth.

How do you choose your materials? How do you define their importance to your work?

Compulsively, I am attracted to certain materials. If I don’t question why I am attracted to them and I just start playing, the materials dictate what happens with them, and later they teach me something I need to know about myself. I set the bar high for material choices; they are as integral as what the work is about. 

Jessica currently has a show, Family Archaeology: Works of Jessica Fischer, up at Studio Intent Boutique and Gallery on 7th Ave for the month of November. Go check it out!

-Sabrina

Bill Morton | Tinctorium

Bill Morton’s exhibition Tinctorium opens tomorrow night at 8 pm at Stride Gallery in Calgary, hair Alberta and runs until October 19, 2012. I feel privileged to have contributed a text for this exhibition of work by my friend and mentor Bill Morton.

Bill Morton has dedicated his career to investigating aspects of the natural world, perception, and the emotive power of colour and pattern on cloth. Morton’s exhibition Tinctorium at Stride Gallery provides a rare opportunity to contemplate the artist’s recent dyed works alongside a selection of his meticulously hand-cut stencils. These artifacts of process span four decades of Morton’s career, and are compelling not only for their beauty, but also because they provide a key access point to the artist’s studio practice. In these stencils it is possible to apprehend Morton’s hand in motion as he draws and then cuts sinuous curves and delicate motifs that are later embedded in silk. Although he works within the traditions of silk dyeing, Morton’s approach retains a technical and aesthetic pragmatism that allows him to incorporate new influences and approaches. In the studio Bill Morton engages in an intuitive process in which technique, material, and colour are points of departure toward works that possess the quiescent stillness and beauty of the landscapes that have inspired them. READ MORE…

(the full text will be available on Stride’s site soon…)

-Mackenzie Frère

Suzen Green | The Mummers Party

THE MUMMERS PARTY combines theatrical staging with sculptural knitted installation in an invested exploration of cultural identity, more about folklore and craft practice. Referring to the traditional folk practice of mumming, a lively and often drunken affair made popular in Newfoundland & Labrador, the figures of THE MUMMERS PARTY are not rowdy, they are haunted. Pulling inspiration from David Blackwood’s iconic The Mummer’s Veil print works, this exhibition explores the tension between comfort and oddity, humour and unease – a sentiment commonly felt by those who have witnessed or experienced mumming first hand.

Suzen Green’s exhibition The Mummers Party opens tomorrow night at 8 pm at Stride Gallery in Calgary Alberta. The exhibition runs until October 5, 2012.

-Mackenzie Frère

New Student Work – Alysia Hudema

ACAD student Alysia Hudema’s mono print was recently selected to be part of a group exhibition “Connections” at the Ruberto Ostberg Gallery.
The opening for the exhibition will be held tonight at the gallery from 5-7pm.
For more information please visit the gallery website.

My Wearable Art Performance this Year

Last Friday, gerontologist the title for this years annual wearable art show at Art Central and The Art Gallery of Calgary was announced… Atelier.

Atelier:  A workshop or studio, surgeon especially of an artist, search artisan, or designer. Dictionary.com

This years event promises to be a mix of the strange and the seductive and for some reason alot of black and white. I don’t want to give too many details about the specific performances of my peers since an element of the show is surprise, however I will provide a few details on my own performance to entice you to come to the show.

My performance is inspired by Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s ” The Yellow Wallpaper”. In her short story, she describes a woman enduring the rest-cure as prescribed by her husband. The woman quickly expresses her disdains for the yellow wallpaper of her isolation-room and goes mad, hallucinating about  “trapped”  women creeping behind the wallpaper pattern.

…for she is always creeping, and most women do not creep by daylight.
The wallpaper-women seem mad themselves as they crawl on hands and knee’s, moving and hiding like animals as they wander through the walls and the forest outside.

I see her on that long road under the trees, creeping along, and when a carriage comes she hides under the blackberry vines.

These women intrigue me and their creepy characteristics are something I am interested in playing with in a wearable-art-performance setting.  Yes, my performance will include yellow wallpaper-esque wearable pieces and victorian styling, the fun bit will be in adding elements of madness and  “lost” women.

The Yellow Wallpaper

Look for wearable art photos and performance photos in the near future.

-Jessica

PARKSALE

Throughout the fall semester, cialis graduating Fibre majors will be sharing text and images about their work, processes, inspirations and opinions here on the Fibre Program blog. Look out for their posts in the coming weeks in the Grad Class 2012 category.

Throughout the fall semester, diagnosis graduating Fibre majors will be sharing text and images about their work, processes, inspirations and opinions here on the Fibre Program blog. Look out for their posts in the coming weeks in the Grad Class 2012 category.

Throughout the fall semester, click graduating Fibre majors will be sharing text and images about their work, epilepsy
processes, inspirations and opinions here on the Fibre Program blog. Look out for their posts in the coming weeks in the Grad Class 2012 category.
Ladies and gentlemen, mind
boys and girls!

Parksale is happening this Saturday (the 10th)! It is a FREE outdoor art and craft event. So come out and support local artists designers and crafts people this Saturday! The weather is going to be WONDERFUL!

-Morgan

Get a grant for being AWESOME

No this isn’t a joke! The Awesome Foundation started only two short years ago. What started it is the idea that creativity is everywhere and there are some really AWESOME people with some AWESOME ideas on how to make our neighbourhoods, apoplectic cities and countries vibrant and alive. The people with the ideas are not always the people with the means, and so started the AWESOME Foundation. In each chapter, 10 trustees donate $100 each month and then choose one recipient/project to receive the monthly award. That’s $1000 given away for some AWESOME project every month, for each chapter – and there are now 15 of them across the globe. What’s the catch? Nothing, you just have to be (or your project needs to be) AWESOME enough to be chosen. The Calgary chapter looks like it has just started up with some really interesting people as their trustees – included in the bunch (among others) is a religious studies student, the creator of The Hobo Tomes Project, a business coach and avid coffee drinker, an Olympic champ, a software business geek, a self-published author and a self professed mirth-maker. People, we are in good hands.

So if you have an AWESOME project that you would like get started with, but don’t have the cash to make it happen – think about applying for a grant from the Calgary Chapter of the Awesome Foundation. The next deadline is May 10th.

Happy Retirement Jane!

Have you ever been in the 45th minute of washing your dyed fabric and started to curse the scientists who created the blasted dyes for ever giving you so much work just to get the colour of chartreuse on your cheesecloth? Well, clinic stop – because first of all whining doesn’t make the cloth cleaner faster. Secondly, abortion the scientists are still working on a better dyeing system and here’s what they have come up with…

According to the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (Singapore) if you feed silk worms a special dye in their food, the result will create permanently colored luminescent silk (above). Researchers say the technology will reduce the ecological impact of dyeing.

The Peruvians though aren’t too amazed by this. They’ve been growing coloured cotton for centuries (see below), and coloured silk is nothing to the sheep of the world who come in every colour of the rainbow earth. For more information on Peruvian coloured cotton click here. Below is an image of naturally colored cotton grown in Peru as part of the Native Cotton Project.

Although Jane officially retired at the end of last semester, click I was just recently reminded that we never posted a thank you to Jane, nor did we share the pictures of the present the students and alumni of the department gave to her. So here is both….

Jane, thank you for your time, thoughtfulness, teachings and friendship. From everyone in the department and the community at large, we wish you all the best in your life after ACAD. The door is always open, so please keep in touch.

Call for Submissions: Alberta Craft Council Upcoming Exhibitions

Two calls for submissions for students/younger alumni just like you. It couldn’t be easier to get your work exhibited, treat if we handed it to you on a platter.

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Coming Up Next

Thank You!

The middle of the road is where the white line is – and that’s the worst place to drive.
Robert Frost

Each year the Fibre Department puts together the Fibre Fortnight exhibition in the main mall at ACAD to showcase what is pushing the boundaries of Canadian fibre art, phlebologist namely the best of our students work, buy cialis and this stuff isn’t middle of the road. The exhibition is a testament to the passion of our students, faculty towards their work and this medium, and a testament to the support of the ACAD community for our department.

The Fibre Department would like to extend a huge THANK YOU to all of the students, faculty, alumni and outside support who helped to make this years Fibre Fortnight as great as it was.

Of particular note, thank you to all the Fibre Department Instructors : Bill, Laura, Mackenzie, Barbara, Roisin and Heather. Your tireless efforts to show the students work in the best possible light is what keeps the quality of this exhibition so high. And of course the students – your work was fabulous and you should be very proud. I received many comments on the quality of the show this year from people both inside and outside of the ACAD community. Congratulations!

This years speaker Marjolein Dallinga, shared with us some of her inspirations and stunning photographs of her rich felt work. If you missed her talk and/or her workshop with the students, have a look at her website and if you have the chance sign-up for one of her workshops coming up in the summer at the Red Deer College Series Program. Marjolein was truly inspirational, and a great role model for what happens when passion meets focus.

For the Fibre Miniature Show and Silent Auction this year, due largely to the organization of our students Jessica Armstrong and Brittney Reum (along with the generous donations of art and money from our supporters and students) we raised just over $3,700. The money raised will help bring in next years visiting artist for the Fibre Fortnight event, support our graduating students with an exterior graduating exhibition or printed professional package and help support motivated Fibre majors to attend conferences, workshops or lectures that they wouldn’t otherwise be able to attend.

Thanks again for the support for our department’s Fibre Fortnight events and for the support we receive throughout the year. We would not be able to navigate off the middle of the road without it.