Artist Talk with Anne Steves – Next Wednesday March 8, 7pm

The Contextural Fibre Arts cooperative, clinic in partnership with ACAD, viagra order  would like to officially invite you to attend the upcoming artist talk with textile and thread based media artist Anne J Steves.   

Location: STANFORD PERROTT LECTURE THEATRE @ the Alberta College of Art + Design.    Date: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 2017 @ 7PM

Anne J Steves is a visual artist working at the intersection of art/craft through textiles and thread based media. Her work examines the narratives of place and the ways in  which craft aesthetics can draw out connections between ourselves and the spaces (both constructed and natural) in which we dwell.

Steves’ work is often instigated by specific sites during artist residencies and independent travel, allowing for interaction with new conditions, communities and materials.

So far these have included a year in a Ranger Station, a collaborative canoe journey down the Rideau Canal, an exploration of string figure making in Victoria and a study of traditional wool blankets in Wales.

For more pictures and writings…    annejsteves.myportfolio.com/

This talk is presented in partnership with Contextural Fibre Arts Cooperative.

ONE MORE WEEK FOR SUBMISSIONS

THERE IS ONE WEEK LEFT TO SUBMIT TO THIS YEARS MINIATURE SHOW / SILENT AUCTION

Please consider donating.

2017 Mini poster
The ACAD Fibre program is seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.
Funds raised support visiting artists, search workshops and student-initiated projects in the Fibre program. Students, alumni, faculty and friends are encouraged to donate work for the show.

Works restricted to 12” in any direction in all mediums will be accepted.

All work must be accompanied by a submission form and dropped off at the Fibre Program office, Rm 414 by Monday, January 30th, 2017.

The Miniature Show will be displayed from February 6 – 16th. The closing event will be held Thursday, February 16th from 5.30 – 8 pm with closing bids in at 7.30 pm.

For more information or a submission form contact kellie.reid@acad.ca or asma.ismail@acad.ca

Seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

2017 Mini poster

The ACAD Fibre program is seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

Funds raised support visiting artists, troche workshops and student-initiated projects in the Fibre program. Students, pilule alumni, ed faculty and friends are encouraged to donate work for the show.

Works restricted to 12” in any direction in all mediums will be accepted.

All work must be accompanied by a submission form and dropped off at the Fibre Program office, Rm 414 by Monday, January 30th, 2017.

The Miniature Show will be displayed from February 6 – 16th. The closing event will be held Thursday, February 16th from 5.30 – 8 pm in Room 371 with closing bids in at 7.30 pm.

For more information or a submission form contact kellie.reid@acad.ca or asma.ismail@acad.ca

 

New Maps of Paradise: Eric + Mia

New Maps of Paradise, recipe currently on display at the Nickle Arts Museum at the University of Calgary features the work of artists Eric Moschopedis and Mia Rushton.  Both artists are Calgary based and the work is focused on community based social projects that the two artists have performed collaboratively since 2007.  Moschopedis comes from a theatre background, while Rushton is focused on a craft based practice.

There is a strong presence of textiles present within the show, including the work titled because even under the cover of darkness we are haunted by the past.  This work is an ongoing quilting project that began in 2012.  The artists conducted ten-question interviews with people they were familiar with.  After the interviews, the artists would choose a phrase that they felt represented the interviewee and imagined that phrase in the form of a quilt.

cover of darkness

Another textile work in the show is we knew the future/before disappearing all together.  This work consists of four quilted banners, spelling out the title of the work on either side of four panels.  This piece represents and celebrates youthful hope, demise and the collectivity of the art community.  From one side of the gallery you can read the words, we knew the future, while from the other side of the gallery you can read, before disappearing all together.

Diana Sherlock’s curatorial ability to translate this performative work into a museum display was due to her borrowing cultural geography and ethnological display techniques.  The work requires the viewer to engage and read the accompanying text.  However, the viewer is rewarded with a clear and deep understanding of the meaning of the work upon doing so.

Running until April 2nd, Eric and Mia: New Maps of Paradise is a strong representation of craft, community and the city of Calgary as a whole.

(image courtesy the artists website: http://www.ericandmia.ca/#/because-even-under-the-cover-of-darkness-we-are-haunted-by-the-past/)

 

-Madison

Gather and Be Alone Together Closing Reception

As I continue my colour research I must acknowledge the artists who work with the absence of colour. Two artists I have been looking at are Maximilian Schubert and Piero Manzoni, what is ed who have a very similar aesthetic.

Schubert is an American artist working with materials towards a minimalist end result. One series of his  imagines “painting-as-object”, anabolics mixing sculpture and painting elements into one. The pieces are done in an all white palette which are then left titled Untitled. Another series inspired by drawing, treat uses brass to create sculptural or 3D drawings. Information on him and his art is limited on line, while lots of images are available.

Schubert 1Schubert 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Format #14- #16, 2013. Brass.

Untitled, 2013. Cast acrylic polyurethane, epoxy, fibreglass, acrylic and vinyl paint.

Manzoni was an Italian artist living from 1933-1963. He is the artist we all know as the guy who canned his own feces and sold it as art. However, what I am interested in is his sculptural, monochromatic paintings. Similar to Schubert’s pieces, Manzoni drew his inspiration from questioning traditional artistic practices, experimenting with new materials and really playing into conceptual art.

W1siZiIsIjE1MDk0OSJdLFsicCIsImNvbnZlcnQiLCItcmVzaXplIDEyODB4MTI4MFx1MDAzRSJdXQ          W1siZiIsIjcwNjIxIl0sWyJwIiwiY29udmVydCIsIi1yZXNpemUgMTI4MHgxMjgwXHUwMDNFIl1d

Achrome, 1960. Kaolin on canvas.

Achrome, 1962. Fibreglass on velvet-covered wood.

 

See Schubert’s work and writing on it here:

http://www.mutualart.com/Exhibitions/Maximilian-Schubert/3AC64AE484AAC775#Info

https://www.artsy.net/artist/maximilian-schubert/works

 

See Manzoni’s work and writing on it here:

http://www.moma.org/collection/artists/3741?=undefined&page=1

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/piero-manzoni-1571

 

-Emily
Please join us on Thursday, physician
January 21 from 5 to 7PM at John Fluevog Calgary (207 8 Ave SW) for the closing reception of Gather and Be Alone Together.

This group exhibition features the work of seven fibre artists from Alberta College of Art + Design. Gather and Be Alone Together explores the community of craft and the solitude of creation. The works show a wide range of fibre techniques including weaving, surgeon
embroidery, infection
knitting and cloth dyeing. Many of the works exemplify the importance of the hand-made and explore the significance of this in today’s society. Works in the show present us with quiet reflections of the artist’s meditations and hold the memories of their process in the creation of the work.

The show takes its name from a quote by Ann Hamilton, a contemporary artist who draws inspiration from one of the most well known textile artists in history, Anni Albers. A nod to both past and present, you are invited to Gather and Be Alone Together.

 

Showcard Front

 

Visiting Artist: Rowland Ricketts

Fibre Fortnight is coming up next semester, approved so I thought I would share the work of Rowland Ricketts, our visiting artist this year.

Ricketts trained in Japan, learning how to farm and dye with indigo.  His work uses traditional techniques and natural processes to create woven and dyed works of art.  Ricketts also creates large installation pieces, working with the gallery space to create an environment for the viewer.

003_R_Ricketts_IAmAi-WarehouseInstallation

I am Ai, We are Ai – Warehouse Installation, Japan, 2012

Rickett’s artist statement begins beautifully with an explination of his process and feelings towards his materials.  He states, “The smell of an indigo vat just as it begins fermenting and springs to life is one of ripeness; a moment of rich potentiality when, as a maker, I momentarily stand between the history of the materials and processes that helped me get the indigo thus far and the promise of all the works that the vat is still yet to realize.”  

 010_R_Ricketts_PastPresent

Past Present, Ohio, 2010

005_R_Ricketts_AsIs

Red Aligned and Centered, Yellow

Rowland Ricketts will be showing his work at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Oregon from January 29, 2016 until June 04, 2016.  That means that if we go on our grad trip to Portland, a wide range of his work will be available for us to view.

All images were taken from Rickett’s website: http://www.rickettsindigo.com/

-Madison

 

Fibre Majors: Call for Submissions

 

Have you ever read Selvedge Magazine? The school library has a subscription and I highly recommend checking it out. A friend of mine got me a digital subscription for my birthday. It is a beautiful publication full of some of my favourite things: textiles in fashion, fine art, interiors, travel and shopping.

I read a really great article in issue 59 this morning written by Kim Werker called: Ugly on Purpose, which also appears in the book Craftivism: The Art of Craft & Activism by Betsy Greer. In the article she discusses overcoming your fear of failure by making something ugly. She came up with the project “Mighty Ugly” when she was faced with the challenge of making a doll. She decided to alleviate her fear of screwing up by intentionally making the doll ugly. This was a profound experience, liberating her from the pressure she put on her self to make things perfect.

ugly doll

From here, her project flourished. She held workshops and invited people to make ugly dolls with her. They would discuss the ugly voices that we all to listen to saying: “You can’t do it” “It’s not worth trying” and “Nobody will care anyways…”

ugly1

 

ugly2

By listening to that voice and letting it convince you not to make something or not to speak out is doing yourself a disservice. “If there’s even a small chance our creations or conversations will make someone smile or raise someone’s consciousness or inspire reflection, that’s reason enough to create or converse.”

Kim Werker now has a book on her project as well as a website: http://www.mightyugly.com/

I really enjoyed reading this piece, it has a lot of parallels to my ideas and work with stains on cloth. Making something ugly is really the beginning of something beautiful 🙂

-Carly

 
 

The Fibre Department is now accepting submissions for our annual show at the Peanut Gallery at John Fluevog Calgary.  The show will run from December 14th until January 30th and is open exclusively to fibre majors.  Submissions must be in by Tuesday, medicine
December 1st
, online
no later than 12:00PM.

Submissions can be emailed to: madisoncpotter@gmail.com. Within the body of your email, Hemorrhoids
please include:

  1. Your name and year of study
  2. Contact information (non-ACAD email if necessary)

Attach to email in PDF form:

  1. A statement (maximum 300 words) that describes the work you are submitting and a brief explanation of your practice as an artist
  2. A point form description of the work that includes:
    1. Title of the work
    2. Materials
    3. Dimensions
    4. Installation requirements
  3. Digital images of your work (minimum 2)
    1. Must be jpeg files
    2. Images must be properly lit and in focus
    3. Please make your images 150 dpi and 1200 pixels along the longest side
    4. If your work requires video or sound please submit electronic files

Please make sure all attached files are in PDF form. The Peanut Gallery does not provide plinths, so please consider work that can be installed without the use of a plinth. The date of installation for the show will be on December 13, 2015 and artists must be available to install their work on that day between 12-5.

If you have any questions about the submission process prior to the deadline, please feel free to contact Madison Potter at madisoncpotter@gmail.com

-Madison

Fibre department garden

The Whitney Biennial may have been divided according to the inclinations of its three curators this year but on every floor there were hints of handicrafts from enormous samples of misshapen glazed pottery to cords of eye-poppingly colorful natural fibers suspended from the ceiling. -Rozalia Jovanovic

Sheila Hicks
Hello ACAD community!

My name is Jolie, surgeon
I am filing in for Tara Niscak, the beloved Fibre Technician while she is on maternity leave.

I wanted to share an exciting new project I am starting here in May. Some of you may know the Fibre department has a big, beautiful patio off room 415, this summer we are going to start a garden growing natural dye plants for our department. As this is a pilot project we will start by growing everything in containers in order to be cost effective and flexible with the space.

A few years ago I read about SAIT’s culinary garden and thought what a great idea it was. I liked the way the garden moves the classroom outside while physically connecting the students to their food and therefore creating a better understanding of what they are eating and serving to their patrons. My hope is by starting this garden our students will gain a better understanding of the materials they use. Working with natural dyes presents a wide and varied range of colours and possibilities. I hope our students will be encouraged to work in a more sustainable way choosing natural dyes over chemical dyes and will learn how easy it is to start their own gardens once they graduate.

In an effort to be environmentally conscious and cost effective I am looking for a few items you might have at home and no longer need. Please have a look through your garages and garden sheds and make a donation to the new Fibre department garden!

  • CLEAN 5 gallon pails
  • Large gardening pots
  • Watering can
  • Hand gardening tools
  • A rain barrel
  • Good quality, clean soil

In addition to these items, I would love to have help from anyone who wants to be involved, send me an email if you are interested in lending a hand. Jolie.bird@acad.ca

Article on SAIT’s culinary garden for your reading pleasure.

natural-dye1

The Textile Arts Center in Brooklyn has been doing this for a few years, have a look!

 

ACAD Fibre Fortnight, Mini Silent Auction + Underwater Basket Weaving!

 

ACAD’s Fibre Program and the School of Craft + Emerging Media are pleased to present a series of events between March 11 and 20, sildenafil 2014 celebrating the talents of current students, phimosis alumni and faculty.

Fibre Fortnight Exhibition
This exhibition takes over the entire ACAD Main Mall and features student work at all levels across a variety of media including mixed media sculpture, surface design, weaving, video and more.

Miniature Silent Auction
Our yearly Fibre program fundraiser features small, collectible pieces donated by ACAD students, alumni, faculty and staff. Bidding is ongoing and will close March 20 at 6 pm. Funds raised support Fibre’s visiting artist program, student initiated projects and the Fibre graduating class. So bid early and bid often. 

Closing Reception + Alumni Panel
Finally, please join us from 5 to 9 pm for the Closing Reception for both exhibitions in the ACAD main mall (3rd floor); and a special alumni panel discussion hosted by the School of Craft + Emerging Media. Underwater Basket Weaving: Risk, Entrepreneurship and Strategies for Success will engage six ACAD alumni in conversation around their successes and overall experiences as entrepreneurs in a range of creative industries. Confirmed alumni panelists are:

Mackenzie Kelly-Frère, Associate Chair, School of Craft + Emerging Media (and ACAD Fibre alumnus) will facilitate the discussion. The panel starts at 7 pm in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre.

All are welcome and this event is open to the public.  We look forward to seeing you there!

Tara’s Baby Shower

 

Martin4

Fine Looking Bunch of Women

pastel, this web etching, lithography on paper

Collection of Checotah Creek Indian Community

Bobby C. Martin

Bobby C. Martin, a painter, has many of the same ideas in his art work that I find in mine. He uses old family photographs to inspire his practice. Martin works mainly with oil paint, but also uses techniques such as encaustic, acrylic, block printing, and etching. Although our mediums are completely different our concepts are very much the same. In his artist statement he says:

“I base many of my works on photographs that belonged to my full blood Indian grandmother, my aunts, my mother—images found in shoeboxes, forgotten in the bottoms of drawers, or found among the tattered black pages of old leather-bound photo albums. The photographs have very personal meanings for me as the artist, but I have found also that there is an almost universal recognition among viewers of a sense of history and identity, evoking memories of their own family’s past.

My hope is for my art to become like an old family photograph—perhaps cherished, perhaps stuffed in a box in the attic—but always able to evoke memories every time it is viewed.”

Martin1

Mom & Mary Ann (The Redhead)

oil and collage on canvas

48 x 72 in.

Martin3

Sunday Best

oil on canvas

24 x 36 in.

Martin2

Granny & Pa

oil on canvas

Courtesy Dr. J.W. Wiggins Native American Art Collection

 

I am drawn to Martin’s work because of his yearning to learn about his family, and himself. While creating new pieces, he says he is able to learn about the people within the photos. He says “it makes you really think about what they were like and what their lives were like.” With my work I try and do the same thing. I am a very family oriented person, and I think this is what drew me to the photographs in the first place. I have a yearning to find out about my ancestors, whether they be alive or passed away. I feel like if I am able to learn about them, I can in turn learn about myself.

 

References: http://www.bobbycmartin.com/Bobby_C._Martins_Art_Site.html

 

 

-Amy

 

 
2014-02-27 13.14.09 2014-02-27 13.17.41 2014-02-27 13.28.39 2014-02-27 13.12.38 2014-02-27 13.11.23 2014-02-27 13.10.42 2014-02-27 13.10.25 2014-02-27 13.08.18 2014-02-27 13.08.08 2014-02-27 13.07.52thanks everyone for coming to the baby shower slash potluck for Tara. if you could not make it you missed out on a fun afternoon with good food, this site
good company, and good conversation! the baby basket for the adopt a family should still be available if anyone has anything to donate.

2014 Miniature Show Silent Auction + Exhibition

Bronwyn Schuster is a young Canadian artist whose work spans several mediums. She primarily paints, troche and within the past year has been involved with an artist residency in Quebec, dentist and is attending The Swedish Academy of Realist Art. Her works touches upon several subjects, including self portraiture, and work that can be described as fantastical. She has created jewelry, art dolls, paintings large and small, commercial work, and is an avid member of several art scenes.

The Scarf- Self Portrait (Bronwyn Schuster, 2013)

(Question) How would you describe yourself as an artist?

(Answer) First question and you’ve already stumped me. I figure a lot of the artist I am is still trapped inside of me, as I lack some of the skills to express what it is that I imagine. I also don’t really know where me begins and artist ends. Mostly though, I am a tea drinking, generally happy, slightly ethereal, wannabe realist painter who uses surrealism far to much as a crutch when things go wrong.

The Swedish Academy of Realist Art                           Photo credit: Bronwyn Schuster

What is the school you are attending, and why did you choose to go there?

The Swedish Academy of Realist (aka SARA {aka Atelier Stockholm}) is a magical school that will pull at the heartstrings of any golden age nostalgist. SARA is built on the tradition of European fine arts ateliers where master painters would take on apprentices, teaching them techniques through a rigid academic approach to figure drawing and painting. Quite simply, we spend the days hunched over Charles Bargue lithographs, copying line for line and shade for shade is precise detail. This is broken up in the day with live model drawing, anatomy and materials lectures. After graduating from lithographs you move onto copying casts, then onto oil painting and still lifes. It’s a three year course, and 8 hour days. Possibly the most intensive immersion into fine arts you could find. Which is precisely why I chose to attend. There is something still striking and haunting about the oil paintings of old. They were true masters of their technique, and it’s not something you can learn at just any school. At SARA I know I am learning in relatively the same fashion that the masters did themselves, and I can even trace the lineage of my teachers (it goes back to Leonardo da Vinci!) I am a pure romanticist too. I really couldn’t imagine attending any other kind of school.

Inspired- Egon Schiele (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

What inspires or influences your different styles? For example, what inspired your Animal Magnetism series, and your self portrait series?

My inspirations are in a constant flux and change. At the moment I have noticed a strong influence from my fellow classmates, and at the same time the Swedish style of living. But, I find it difficult to explain my inspiration because I am such a visual person. You’ll just have to come over for tea so that I can show you. I can, however, explain how my self portrait series came about. One fine winter morning, out in the prairies of Saskatchewan, I found myself very frustrated with my particular art skill level and inability to paint portraits. This was the time before I had means to attend SARA, so I took it upon myself to research up artists I admired, delve into their life story and then try to replicate their style. I figured trying to mimic their techniques would teach me something, and choosing to paint myself gave me both 24/7 access to a live model (who I did not have to impress) and it insured that I wasn’t directly copying a painters art work. Thus my “Inspired By” self portrait series was born. I may have also had some influence by my photographer friend Susan Knight who had started a similar project in digital media. The animal people though? I can’t explain that. I have no clue where that came from …

Red Riding Hood (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Have you ever experienced artists’ block? What do you do to counter it?

Ah, artists block. I know you well. Artist block comes in many forms for me. There is technical artist block for starters. It’s when I’ve got the ideas, the subject, the materials and everything in front of me, and then I start working and EVERYTHING feels wrong. No matter what I do, I can’t replicate what I see in front of me or in my mind. It might be the most frustrating form of artists block for me. Usually it happens right on a huge learning curve, and you just have to power through it. But sometimes it’s good to take a break. Make something nice to drink and try again later. Generally I have to remember that it is not as bad as I think it is. Creative artists block usually happens due to lack of sleep. That’s when I rest and let the pressure go. If it lasts more than two days, then I’m just being lazy. Creativity is a muscle. You have to exercise it. Try new things. Write. Research, and have interesting conversations with people. Last of all artists blocks is procrastination. This one is sneaky. It comes in the form of “But I need to do this first!” Be that: make food, finish a chapter of a book, check facebook, do your taxes, organize something, go to the store, research something, watch a youtube video (who are you trying to kid). These are not important (okay, maaaybe food and taxes are) always put aside time for art and always use that time for art. As my friend Vincent always likes to say “What do we say to the god of unproductivity? … Not today!”

Artist block is not a valid excuse. Go make some art!

Inspired- Leonor Fini (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Bronwyn’s artwork et al can be found here: http://bronwynschuster.com/

 

-Emmelia Taylor

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, pharm
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 

The Reparative Impulse

 

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, tadalafil
but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

I found this and had to share it – especially for anyone else who is going through the “fourth year-final semester” angst. This kinda just says it all for me – and is a bit apropos for the readings that we are doing in Fibre 451, pilule
Grad class.

Hemorrhoids
Sept. 23, 2013″ src=”http://fibre.acadnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Sartre-Recipes-New-Yorker-470×422.jpeg” width=”470″ height=”422″ /> New Yorker Magazine, Sept. 23, 2013

 

Pick a pencil. Any pencil. Are you sure that is the right one? Maybe a pen.Or a brush. Grab some paper. What colour paper? Maybe you want a canvas. Or try organza. What colour warp? But are you sure you want to weave this? Take another look. What about mixed media for that. How do you know? etc.

lol. Christine

 

 

 

 
2014 MiniatureHello ACAD Community, read more

The annual Miniature Show Silent Auction and Exhibition is calling for submissions!

The Miniature Show will be exhibited as part of Fibre Fortnight March 10th-21st, cheap in the Main Mall. The silent auction will run until Thursday the 20th, physician
final bids at 6:30pm. All proceeds from the auction will be donated to Fibre Department for funding visiting artists and student enrichment.

Submitted artworks must be of 12”x12″x12″ or smaller, of any medium and subject matter. Artworks are accepted from all departments, students, faculty and alumni.

To submit work please email the title, medium, size, artist name, and a short description of any details by February 28th. All artwork can be delivered to the Fibre Department March 10th -14th.

Please email submissions to Natalie Lauchlan at natalie.lauchlan@acad.ca

Cheers,

The Fibre Department