Yarn Box

This semester I am taking a painting class. For the second project I had researched artist Lydia Gifford and applied three of her themes to my piece. This included monochromatic materials, try
layering and challenging traditional methods of painting in combination with sculptural aspects. Here I was able to reverse my artistic practice, which is usually deconstructing painting through colour, to the use of paint with very tactile materials.
I have many many, Sildenafil
many things. I am grateful to be able to take a cab tomorrow morning. I want to be early, like get there for 7am, so I can put rust on my shirts, because that needs to be done. Even though I have many things I feel like nothing is 100% done and everything is sitting at a solid half doneness. I feel like this is a large project for me and that is exciting. Although, it almost got ruined when my pipes decided to leak all over the place, because, of course, I was keeping my suitcase of work right where the pipes decided to leak.

I have to give  a half hour talk on Friday for the FINA class and that is not exciting. Mainly my talk will be about bricolage and how I use it in wearable artworks. I dont like talking very much, especially public talking in front of a group of people. I think I will bring up artists like Nick Cave and the fellow that bricolages golf bags (I’ll have to look him up again when I get home from work), and anyone else I can think of.

– Chelsey Wensveen

 
I have many many, neurosurgeon
many things. I am grateful to be able to take a cab tomorrow morning. I want to be early, like get there for 7am, so I can put rust on my shirts, because that needs to be done. Even though I have many things I feel like nothing is 100% done and everything is sitting at a solid half doneness. I feel like this is a large project for me and that is exciting. Although, it almost got ruined when my pipes decided to leak all over the place, because, of course, I was keeping my suitcase of work right where the pipes decided to leak.

I have to give  a half hour talk on Friday for the FINA class and that is not exciting. Mainly my talk will be about bricolage and how I use it in wearable artworks. I dont like talking very much, especially public talking in front of a group of people. I think I will bring up artists like Nick Cave and the fellow that bricolages golf bags (I’ll have to look him up again when I get home from work), and anyone else I can think of.

– Chelsey Wensveen

 
This year for Christmas one of my favourite gifts my mom gave to me was a three month subscription to a company called Yarn Box.

They have four different subscriptions you can choose from:

Yarn Box Socks which is the cheapest subscription, recipe you usually get enough wool to knit a pair of socks this also includes a pattern.

Yarn Box Classic which is what I have been getting. My first project I got enough wool to knit a shawl and my second project was a knit plush kitten toy pattern. They also give crochet patterns with this subscription.

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Yarn Box Luxe is a seasonal subscription so only 4 a year. You get a lot of wool in this package its one of the most expensive ones but you get really interesting fibres. This also includes a pattern.

And the last one is called Yarn Box Art Yarns this one is also seasonal and more expensive but you get a lot of wool and really interesting fibres.

Im really happy with what I have been getting I would recommend this to anyone who likes to knit or crochet. There is usually up to 5 different color-ways for each month and they are all usually pretty nice. When you sign up you get to customize what colours and yarn weights you like so they can try and match up the best yarn for you.

 

-Nicole

 

 

Knit Party Fun

Over reading break in my hometown I decided to try and teach people how to knit.

I hosted a Wool and the Gang knitting party where they set up the event and sell the wool but I teach the class.

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It was very successful 13 people signed up and everyone finished there Snood Operator which was the name of the project.

 

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The knitting projects are super fun and for all levels of knitting and the best part is that you get your project for half the price and the host gets one for free!

Knit Parties

 

-Nicole

Material Choices

Some of the wool I have been using this semester comes from a company called:

Wool and the Gang.

 

They sell interesting fibres like their mixtape yarn which is made from upscycled t-shirt scraps.

Or the Jersey Be Good yarn which uses scraps from factory floors in the fashion industry.

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I usually just buy their Crazy Sexy Wool because wool is my favourite fibre to knit with and is natural, viagra order renewable and biodegradable.

 

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Wool and the Gang has been changing the way fashion is created and consumed. They sell sustainable products and patterns, and sell readymade hand knit clothes and accessories.

They also try to promote people to learn to knit to promote people to buy less and make more.

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” Wool and the Gang was born — pioneering fashion production that’s made in a sustainable way, bringing back knitting as a viable means of production for generations to come.”  -Wool and the Gang

 

-Nicole

Knit Clock

I came across this knitting clock designed by Siren Elise Wilhelmsen.

knitclock1

I think its a really interesting object I would love to have one but  I don’t think they are currently for sale.

knitclock2

The clock knits 24 hours a day one year at the time, geriatrician showing the physical representation of time as a creative and tangible force. After 365 days the clock has turned the passed year into a 2 m long scarf.

Here is Her Website

 

-Nicole

Things are Getting Better

As midterm has suddenly approached I am left feeling overwhelmed and slightly behind.

As some of you may know I have had many issues with my warp being twisted in many directions and it has taken a lot more time than I had planned it would.

I am finally threading and hoping not to have as many issues while weaving.

nicole threading

I had also had some issues with the knitting machine I was given It had kept getting stuck in-between stitches and dropping stitches. But it seems to be working now since ordering a new sponge bar for underneath.

I am finally feeling like I’m at a point where things might actually work out and get done!

knitmachine

-Nicole

Sandra Backlund: Twists & Layers

This past Friday I attended the opening of Charlotte Moth’s Living Images show and Celia Perrin Sidarous’ show titled Interiors, prostate Other Chambers. Both are solo exhibitions installed parallel to one another at the Esker Foundation in Inglewood.

easker

Both Moth’s and Sidarous’ work seems relevant to my practice through common themes and material interests, healing and was also eye opening in terms of installation approaches.  Moth’s work consists of comparing and contrasting different mediums, buy just as mine will. Sidarous’ work spoke most to my interests as I found it most pleasing visually. Her images of collaged and assembled found objects relates to my study of still life art. Within each ‘still life’ photo she creates, the colors became an important aspect in the composition. This is another relevant matter in my practice- color theory. Sidarous’ photographs were not all displayed at eye level as is commonly seen in a gallery setting. Rather, they were hung at varying levels and even a few pieces were resting against the wall on the floor, which only added an additional amount of satisfaction for me.

This well-curated exhibition is one I would and should return to. Openings are great social events with a bonus of  free food and cheap wine, however in order to fully appreciate the artists work it is necessary to visit at a time with less people and distractions.

-Emily

 
October 17, viagra sale
2015 – One Day Only!

Hillhurst/Sunnyside Community Centre
1320 5th Ave, viagra buy
NW, Calgary, AB T2N 0S2

Fibre for Spinning and Felting
Yarns – Lots of Hand Dyed!
Beads and Buttons – Hand Made!
Kits and Crafts
Demonstrations by Vendors

for more information, please see website
October 17, geriatrician
2015 – One Day Only!

Hillhurst/Sunnyside Community Centre
1320 5th Ave, buy cialis NW, dosage
Calgary, AB T2N 0S2

Fibre for Spinning and Felting
Yarns – Lots of Hand Dyed!
Beads and Buttons – Hand Made!
Kits and Crafts
Demonstrations by Vendors

for more information, please see website
When I was doing some research for my Grad paper I came across a Fashion designer named Sandra Backlund.

Sandra Backlund image 3

I came across some of her work in the book Knitting Fashion, and
Industry & Craft by Sandy Black, dysentery
which is found in the library.

Some things I liked in her work was her use of twists and layering. These are some ideas I have been trying to mimic. In one of my designs I would like to create a opened up cable to overlay onto a solid sweater.

Here is a link to her website and some images of her recent work:

Her Website

FW13-pic11-Photo-Kristian-Loveborg

Sandra Backlund image 2

-Nicole

Hours & Hours of Work

I have been using a new tool to keep track of the many threads that seems to fly forth from one article to the next as I journey down the rabbit hole. This tool is called Zotero. It was introduced to my class and I in Print 314 by our proffessor Laurel Johannesson. You can download Zotero for free at Zotero.org.

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Zotero works as either a stand alone app or as an add-on for your web browser. This app has been extremely helpful to me because while doing rearch it allows me to easily store, case
recall and catagorize citations for articles, malady
books, etc both found from electronic and paper form.

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You can make notes on each citation you make aswell create folders to put them in to better organize your thoughts. Also by clicking your desired citation then clicking either the URL or DOI it brings you back to the article for easy recall. The best feature to me in the ability to form a bibliography quickly and easily. This is done by selecting the citations you wish to include, then clicking Edit in the top bar followed by Copy Bibiliography.

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To enter you citation into Zotero click the small page icon found in the address bar.

I hope this helps everyone as much as it has me!

 

-Amy
I have been using a new tool to keep track of the many threads that seems to fly forth from one article to the next as I journey down the rabbit hole. This tool is called Zotero. It was introduced to my class and I in Print 314 by our proffessor Laurel Johannesson. You can download Zotero for free at Zotero.org.

Screen Shot 2015-10-19 at 4.32.38 PM

Zotero works as either a stand alone app or as an add-on for your web browser. This app has been extremely helpful to me because while doing rearch it allows me to easily store, patient recall and catagorize citations for articles, books, etc both found from electronic and paper form.

Screen Shot 2015-10-19 at 4.42.57 PM

You can make notes on each citation you make aswell create folders to put them in to better organize your thoughts. Also by clicking your desired citation then clicking either the URL or DOI it brings you back to the article for easy recall. The best feature to me in the ability to form a bibliography quickly and easily. This is done by selecting the citations you wish to include, then clicking Edit in the top bar followed by Copy Bibiliography.

Screen Shot 2015-10-19 at 4.59.54 PM

To enter you citation into Zotero click the small page icon found in the address bar.

I hope this helps everyone as much as it has me!

-Amy
 

A very inspiring designer of mine is Yokoo Gibran. She knits and crochets accessories. Seeing her work was one of the main reasons I decided to teach myself how to knit three years ago. I also enjoy following her Instagram she has a interesting way of placing and photographing objects.

Her Instagram

Cones & cones

Her Shop

pile of scarves

 

I came across a article about her and her job as a knit wear designer:

New York Times Article

 

The article is about having a successful craft business and how much you might make, population health
but also how busy you can get.

Yokoo Gibran had wrote:

“I have to wake up around 8, get coffee or tea, and knit for hours and hours and hours and hours, I’m like an old lady in a chair, catching up on podcasts, watching old Hitchcock shows. I will do it for 13 hours a day.”

And even after all those hours knitting, she is constantly sketching new designs or trading e-mail messages with 50 or more customers a day.

Sounds great but maybe not so great!

bag

-Nicole

The Knit Kid

In my search to find a new art journal, glands I stumbled across Frankie. Frankie is a bi-monthly Australian Magazine that covers everyday life happenings and most importantly, art, design and craft!

frankie1

On their blog there are sections separating these three topics from each other, bringing an interesting conversation to how a magazine views the differences and similarities between them. Here I found a variety of multi-media artists including textile artists. Most of the art on their page could be categorizedas cute, mundane or even slightly kitschy.

Regardless this magazine is worth an inspection. My favourite artist I found on Frankie is Sula Fay and her embroidery with her own hair onto doilies:

6aacbde6ecec0b18a9466ce52dda7096_M.jpg.pagespeed.ce.mme7d12rpE willendorf

Find artists printed in Frankie Magazine here:

http://www.frankie.com.au/blogs/art

http://www.frankie.com.au/blogs/craft

http://www.frankie.com.au/blogs/design

And Fay’s artwork here:

http://cargocollective.com/sulabermudez

 

-Emily
While scanning through some blogs over the past month I came across the winners of the 2015 Etsy design awards in Germany and Austria on the Art and Design blog Ignant. There were some really interesting crafted furnishings and accessories, buy including works by:

PetitFou: Paper clutches

&

Nauli: Illustrated hanging lights

The winner of the fashion design award was given to Sabrina Weigt is a high quality knitwear and knitted accessories designer and seller, symptoms
her shop is called:

The Knit Kid

TheKnitKid_image1

TheKnitKid_image2

I like her simple and lightweight designs along with her use of colour.

Her use of machine knitting is inspiring for myself as it is something I wish to explore in the next couple of weeks and see if I can create hand and machine knit garments and accessories combined with woven material.

Her processes and goals is something I look at for inspiration as well as selling my products and creating a craft business is a future goal I wish to achieve.

A bit about her process practice and business goals:

The Knit Kid Etsy Interview

TheKnitKid_image3

 

-Nicole

 

Knitting at the Kensington Pub – Tonight!

Be a part of the Interpurl Knitwork!

The Interpurl Knitwork is an exciting art project based on the connections we
make with social media.Women have always come together to create useful works of art for their
communities while socializing. Quilting bees and knitting circles were once one
of the main forums for social interaction in many communities.

I want to show how social media can be a community where women come together to socialize and knit!

To start to the project we are meeting
at the Kensington Pub on Wednesday, one health January 23, viagra 100mg from 6-9.
Bring your knitting – or there will be extra there – also people to teach you if you don’t know how.

Anyone who is interested in this project will knit one square 6″- 8″ any colour
and any material – what you have on hand is good – and send it to me by February
8, 2013.

Invite anyone and everyone via any media you use, the more the merrier! We hope
to create a huge blanket, symbolizing the power of women united through social
media all over the world. This blanket will be a part of a submission to
Interventions at the Banff Centre at the end of February.

With your square please include :
Your first name
Where you live
Who invited you to the Interpurl Knitwork
How they invited you (email, text, facebook, twitter, etc)
Three words which describe your feelings about participating in this project
Pin the paper to your square and send it to:

Elisa’s Studio Rm 380, ACAD

or:

Interpurl Knitwork
#229- 1104- 1240- Kensington Rd. NW
Calgary, AB Canada T2N 4X7

Facebook Event:https://www.facebook.com/events/397785386977630/?fref=ts
Twitter:https://twitter.com/Interpurl

 

Air over land | installation part 1

Tomoko Arakawa is an artist who has inspired me not just with her art work, price but also her words. I wanted to share both with you all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toki no inori (Prayer for Time)

Stainless Steel, cystitis Pigment; Macrame and free technique

200 x 120 x 30 cm

2010

In Toki no inori (Prayer for Time) Tomoko has created a beautiful hand knotted and twisted basket out of stainless steel and pigment. As I am well-aware (thanks to my most recent warping experience), ed stainless steel is very difficult to work with, and I am amazed by the intricacy of the twisted little knots of the piece. The piece is small as it is, at 200 x 120 x 30 cm.

In the catalogue for the exhibit Fiber Futures, Japans Textile Pioneers, Arakawa explains her emotional catalyst for making the piece in an eloquently succinct artist statement:

In Prayer for Time, I made a piece whose design conjures up a sense of air and water, as a way of showing my gratitude to the relatives, friends and acquaintances I’ve shared my life with so far, and expressing my hope that my time with them can go on forever. Teh blue area in the center was inspired by the shape of a leaf or a lake: water as a source of life and a deep well of tolerance…”

I was blown away by the intensity of this statement, conveyed in but a few lines. I highly recommend checking out the catalogue, it is worth spending some time reading.

xoxo,

Katherine

 

DSC_0118

On Sunday, see Kris and I travelled to the site where Air over land is to be installed. With the help of my father Ed Frère we hung one of the pieces to test the attachment point (This will likely be refined somewhat once the other two are in place.) and to determine if the work would actually fly in the wind.

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I was greatly assisted in the knitting of these pieces by artist Marci Simkulet. The knit “skeleton” of each piece is a thin madder-dyed linen. I then overlaid and felted a fine layer of merino wool into the red mesh of knitting to provide a membrane that would catch the wind and perhaps deteriorate over time in the weather. Jason Hussey created the fine steel frame to support each tube.

DSC_0198

In this last image you can see the massive dugout my father and his brother created to collect water for trees that he has planted on the property. It is a very deep cut into the earth in a crescent shape, information pills
its depth was necessary to reach clay that will actually hold water. Although not initially part of the project, I think this unintentional earthwork is a remarkable intervention in the landscape that relates to some of the ideas I am investigating with Air over land.

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It was an incredibly beautiful, and very cold day, but there was no wind. The morning after we installed the first piece I received a video from my mother Lorna Sarah…

The final two pieces will be installed after Christmas sometime.

-Mackenzie Frère

Comfortably Uncomfortable

I am interested in the patterning of certain imagery to alter its original context. Taking an image, clinic altering its position, layering it with other images, or repeating it, can affect how the pattern is read. The intent becomes complex in that the images, layered with others or in a repeated pattern, can be seen as either a part of the whole, or be viewed as a larger ensemble consisting of smaller entities. It is interesting to see how a viewer engages with the work – from a first glance at the whole, to a more in depth examination of each part. Patterning has captivated my interests not only because of its historical influence but how different uses of a simple print, can transform its message. Each print I create is a connection with different aspects of my identity: my heritage, my femininity, and my values as a woman. I want to challenge assumptions people have about beauty and its relationship to feminism.

An older project of mine, Body Image was an experimental project to provoke my initial thinking about these concepts. Using two pieces of sheer silk I dyed them using onion skins, to create a light, pinky flesh tone. On one piece of silk, I repeat printed botanical imagery in a red hue as a contrast to the pink fabric. On the other, I used a very light baby pink and repeated imagery of 1950’s pin up girls. When hung one behind the other, the light shines through the fabrics, and reveals the images together. The work is a reflection on female sexuality and the stereotypes of the female form. The use of these over-popularized images is to show female dominance. The pin up girls are brazenly flaunting their sexuality and desire, yet they are hidden amongst the foliage, implying their passion is shameful or should be hidden from others. I feel the two images compliment each other because of the feminine symbolism the flowers in full bloom may hold when paired with the provocative poses of the girls. The curves of the plants echoing those of the female body, creating a pattern that suggests the fertility of both women and plants. A reaction from some viewers that struck me was a comment about how the flowers seem to be showing off, just like the pin up girls. Both images exploit each other – there is a playfulness, yet also an assertion of sexuality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This layering of pieces to combine images is where I would like to experiment further.

-Lauren Plante
I am interested in the patterning of certain imagery to alter its original context. Taking an image, Sildenafil
altering its position, case layering it with other images, order
or repeating it, can affect how the pattern is read. The intent becomes complex in that the images, layered with others or in a repeated pattern, can be seen as either a part of the whole, or be viewed as a larger ensemble consisting of smaller entities. It is interesting to see how a viewer engages with the work – from a first glance at the whole, to a more in depth examination of each part. Patterning has captivated my interests not only because of its historical influence but how different uses of a simple print, can transform its message. Each print I create is a connection with different aspects of my identity: my heritage, my femininity, and my values as a woman. I want to challenge assumptions people have about beauty and its relationship to feminism.

An older project of mine, Body Image was an experimental project to provoke my initial thinking about these concepts. Using two pieces of sheer silk I dyed them using onion skins, to create a light, pinky flesh tone. On one piece of silk, I repeat printed botanical imagery in a red hue as a contrast to the pink fabric. On the other, I used a very light baby pink and repeated imagery of 1950’s pin up girls. When hung one behind the other, the light shines through the fabrics, and reveals the images together. The work is a reflection on female sexuality and the stereotypes of the female form. The use of these over-popularized images is to show female dominance. The pin up girls are brazenly flaunting their sexuality and desire, yet they are hidden amongst the foliage, implying their passion is shameful or should be hidden from others. I feel the two images compliment each other because of the feminine symbolism the flowers in full bloom may hold when paired with the provocative poses of the girls. The curves of the plants echoing those of the female body, creating a pattern that suggests the fertility of both women and plants. A reaction from some viewers that struck me was a comment about how the flowers seem to be showing off, just like the pin up girls. Both images exploit each other – there is a playfulness, yet also an assertion of sexuality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This layering of pieces to combine images is where I would like to experiment further.

-Lauren Plante
I am interested in the patterning of certain imagery to alter its original context. Taking an image, women’s health
altering its position, Mycoplasmosis
layering it with other images, or repeating it, can affect how the pattern is read. The intent becomes complex in that the images, layered with others or in a repeated pattern, can be seen as either a part of the whole, or be viewed as a larger ensemble consisting of smaller entities. It is interesting to see how a viewer engages with the work – from a first glance at the whole, to a more in depth examination of each part. Patterning has captivated my interests not only because of its historical influence but how different uses of a simple print, can transform its message. Each print I create is a connection with different aspects of my identity: my heritage, my femininity, and my values as a woman. I want to challenge assumptions people have about beauty and its relationship to feminism.

An older project of mine, Body Image was an experimental project to provoke my initial thinking about these concepts. Using two pieces of sheer silk I dyed them using onion skins, to create a light, pinky flesh tone. On one piece of silk, I repeat printed botanical imagery in a red hue as a contrast to the pink fabric. On the other, I used a very light baby pink and repeated imagery of 1950’s pin up girls. When hung one behind the other, the light shines through the fabrics, and reveals the images together. The work is a reflection on female sexuality and the stereotypes of the female form. The use of these over-popularized images is to show female dominance. The pin up girls are brazenly flaunting their sexuality and desire, yet they are hidden amongst the foliage, implying their passion is shameful or should be hidden from others. I feel the two images compliment each other because of the feminine symbolism the flowers in full bloom may hold when paired with the provocative poses of the girls. The curves of the plants echoing those of the female body, creating a pattern that suggests the fertility of both women and plants. A reaction from some viewers that struck me was a comment about how the flowers seem to be showing off, just like the pin up girls. Both images exploit each other – there is a playfulness, yet also an assertion of sexuality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This layering of pieces to combine images is where I would like to experiment further.

-Lauren Plante
 

 

I had stumbled on this a while back and thought I’d share my discovery from many moons ago. Well in case you haven’t figured it out yet, cheap
this is a shoe!

 

Designed by Andreia Chaves

 

I found these pretty amazing, pregnancy
not only for its spectacular craftsmanship that probably went into these, but these are really REALLY amazing! The concept of having a shoe as a reflective vice begs us to question the intentions of the designer. I found this shoe to be a remarkable piece, not only as a fashion accessory but as an art piece. I think it allows us to question our surroundings in a different way. Perhaps, allows us to question ourselves. To evaluate shoes in a whole new way or even consider them in a whole new light.  This shoe pushes boundaries of a shoe which may question our boundaries in a structured society.   

Kristyn

 
I was recently once again looking through a beautiful book on Sheila Hicks, eczema
Weaving as Metaphor.

This book not only contains a number of beautiful small weavings from Hicks which she wove throughout her life, denture
but it also contains some interesting writing on weaving. The one essay that particularly fascinated me was the title work by Arthur C. Danto. His aim was to write about the meaning of textiles and weaving beginning not from a culture distant from our Western context, viagra sale but from the Greeks, whose culture and thought our own civilization is descended from. Danto goes on to talk about how Plato, who had a decidedly negative view of the fine arts, in his writing about statecraft drew on weaving as the ideal metaphor for how government should function. The use of weaving as such a metaphor suggests a higher view of weaving for the ancient Greeks, one that praises weaving for its structure, usefulness, and beauty.
 

 

I have been taking these creatures that I created over the last few years and placing them in a domestic setting. This has developed a contrast where one questions whether these creatures belong and allows viewers to develop a narrative for what could be going on. This also reactivates the site allowing the viewer to investigate, ascariasis
explore and imagine new possibilities, unhealthy a new inflection. Domestic settings have always been complicated for me. Although they are a place of comfort, ailment
they are also places filled with uncomfortable memories. I think that this contrast is also contained within the bodies of these creatures; they are made of a comfortable material, but display what most are not comfortable interacting with. Ann Hamilton once stated that “it’s very difficult for us to deal with anything that’s supposed to be inside that’s outside, and supposed to be outside that’s inside.” We pursue knowledge in order to stay within a comfortable place.  When interacting with these creatures it is my hope that a whimsical nature is established, where people are able to create their own knowledge.  When the audience is invited to be actively present in the work they become immersed, developing a conversation between their own bodies and that of the work they are interacting with.

 

Simo, .Joan. Ann Hamilton. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002.

Sheena Perratt

An Array of Information

I am now working on a painting of bees and the foods they pollinate. So many cool things to learn. I just discovered that there are blue bees – Orchard Mason Bees (Osmia lignaria) fondly called BOBs for Blue Orchard Bees. These are solitary bees that orchard keepers encourage by providing year round flowers for them to collect nectar and pollen, sales and wooden blocks with holes drilled in them in which they can nest.

 

The work is a three part painting, with panels of fine silk organza stretched taut over hexagonal frames. The lower layer will have images of fruits and nuts that we eat, that are pollinated only, or primarily by bees. The middle later will depict the flowers from which they collect pollen and nectar. The upper layer will depict the various kinds of bees responsible for these important tasks. Lights underneath will shine through the three layers so that they become one – the fruits, the flowers, and the bees.

A lovely watercolour of a Blue Orchard Bee by Valerie Littlewood (Blog: Pencil and Leaf at Blogspot.ca)

The planning has been complicated. I researched bee pollinated plants, to determine which species I wanted to paint. I researched bees, to ensure that I had the correct species. Then I looked at the dyes I used, at he wood for the frames, and even the penetrating oil on the wood, to ensure that each species was either pollinated by bees, or provided pollen or nectar to bees. Much to my carpenter friend’s dismay, I eliminated fir, for it is wind pollinated with no indication that bees collect the pollen.
I am now working on a painting of bees and the foods they pollinate. So many cool things to learn. I just discovered that there are blue bees – Orchard Mason Bees (Osmia lignaria) fondly called BOBs for Blue Orchard Bees. These are solitary bees that orchard keepers encourage by providing year round flowers for them to collect nectar and pollen, information pills
and wooden blocks with holes drilled in them in which they can nest.

 

A lovely watercolour of a Blue Orchard Bee by Valerie Littlewood (Blog: Pencil and Leaf at Blogspot.ca)

The work is a three part painting, melanoma
with panels of fine silk organza stretched taut over hexagonal frames. The lower layer will have images of fruits and nuts that we eat, that are pollinated only or primarily by bees. The middle later will depict the flowers from which they collect pollen and nectar. The upper layer will depict the various kinds of bees responsible for these important tasks. Lights underneath will shine through the three layers so that they become one – the fruits, the flowers, and the bees.

The planning has been complicated. I researched bee pollinated plants, to determine which species I wanted to paint. I researched bees, to ensure that I had the correct species. Then I looked at the dyes I used, at the wood for the frames, and even the penetrating oil on the wood, to ensure that each species was either pollinated by bees, or provided pollen or nectar to bees. Much to my carpenter friend’s dismay, I eliminated fir, for it is wind pollinated with no indication that bees collect the pollen.
I am now working on a painting of bees and the foods they pollinate. So many cool things to learn. I just discovered that there are blue bees – Orchard Mason Bees (Osmia lignaria) fondly called BOBs for Blue Orchard Bees. These are solitary bees that orchard keepers encourage by providing year round flowers for them to collect nectar and pollen, physician
and wooden blocks with holes drilled in them in which they can nest.

 

The work is a three part painting, with panels of fine silk organza stretched taut over hexagonal frames. The lower layer will have images of fruits and nuts that we eat, that are pollinated only, or primarily by bees. The middle later will depict the flowers from which they collect pollen and nectar. The upper layer will depict the various kinds of bees responsible for these important tasks. Lights underneath will shine through the three layers so that they become one – the fruits, the flowers, and the bees.

A lovely watercolour of a Blue Orchard Bee by Valerie Littlewood (Blog: Pencil and Leaf at Blogspot.ca)

The planning has been complicated. I researched bee pollinated plants, to determine which species I wanted to paint. I researched bees, to ensure that I had the correct species. Then I looked at the dyes I used, at he wood for the frames, and even the penetrating oil on the wood, to ensure that each species was either pollinated by bees, or provided pollen or nectar to bees. Much to my carpenter friend’s dismay, I eliminated fir, for it is wind pollinated with no indication that bees collect the pollen.
I am now working on a painting of bees and the foods they pollinate. So many cool things to learn. I just discovered that there are blue bees – Orchard Mason Bees (Osmia lignaria) fondly called BOBs for Blue Orchard Bees. These are solitary bees that orchard keepers encourage by providing year round flowers for them to collect nectar and pollen, buy
and wooden blocks with holes drilled in them in which they can nest.

 

A lovely watercolour of a Blue Orchard Bee by Valerie Littlewood (Blog: Pencil and Leaf at Blogspot.ca)

The work is a three part painting, information pills
with panels of fine silk organza stretched taut over hexagonal frames. The lower layer will have images of fruits and nuts that we eat, that are pollinated only or primarily by bees. The middle later will depict the flowers from which they collect pollen and nectar. The upper layer will depict the various kinds of bees responsible for these important tasks. Lights underneath will shine through the three layers so that they become one – the fruits, the flowers, and the bees.

The planning has been complicated. I researched bee pollinated plants, to determine which species I wanted to paint. I researched bees, to ensure that I had the correct species. Then I looked at the dyes I used, at the wood for the frames, and even the penetrating oil on the wood, to ensure that each species was either pollinated by bees, or provided pollen or nectar to bees. Much to my carpenter friend’s dismay, I eliminated fir, for it is wind pollinated with no indication that bees collect the pollen.

Knitted Crab Spider

As a small child I was drawn to anatomy, pill
the idea of so many things fitting into one space and all of these things having a purpose astounded me. I sought to find stability in nature where I did not find it in my home life. I had an intense desire to understand anatomy and obtain more knowledge of it; this desire has always been present with me.  I had never questioned this desire until I began creating anatomical creatures such as a mouse, cat, fox, shark etc..  In the beginning I worked with what I understood best which was sewing, yet when I learned how to knit the medium was more inviting to human interaction.  I knew that things made by the hand have the power to encourage further human interaction and this interaction became essential for any of these creatures to feel complete.  Before commencing on one of these creatures I would collect as much knowledge and information on them as I could.  I would then begin knitting them from the inside out, always ending with the eyes.  This strict process and obsession with creating these creatures lead me to question their significance, what are they trying to say? This took me down a path of research where I consumed an array of information and discovered four key factors to this work dissection (anatomy), knowledge, uncertainty, and imagination.

Sheena P.

Pauline Macura Brown | Wounds, Scars, Recovery

My work is informed by an exploration of my own identity as a first generation Canadian of Polish ancestry, pill an ancestry that has been overshadowed by my father’s WWII experience. As with many war veterans’ offspring: the second generation of post- memory, resuscitator my history is one of silence. Using laborious production techniques (such as knitting, order sewing and embroidery) combined with conventional drawing and painting, I interrupt the silence of the past to make audible the hidden, forgotten and overlooked histories that haunt and continue to haunt even in generations that did not experience the trauma of war.

Pauline Macura Brown’s exhibition at the Marion Nicol Gallery opens this Thursday at 5 pm. See you there.

Nanna van Blaaderen

studio 54, decease 1978

Still working out your New Year’s resolutions? Why not resolve to pursue more exhibition opportunities in 2013?

-Mackenzie
Fairy Tales, gynecologist
Monsters and the Genetic Imagination 

On Saturday September 29th 2012, the Glenbow opened up there doors to the public to showcase an exciting new exhibition. it is derived from ideas of fairy tails, monsters, and genetic imagination.  highly inspired by literature, science fictions and experimentation. There are some amazing artist being shown, such as Kiki Smith, David Altmejd and Patricia Piccinini.

I am encouraging everyone to take some time and have a look at this exhibition, unfortunately we can no longer get into the Glenbow free, but it only cost $9.00 with a valid student ID, also i would recommend looking to the student membership of only $35.00 for a year ( It also has some awesome perks, such as getting you into the AGA free and many other gallerys around Cananda)

https://www.glenbow.org/exhibitions/current/

 

– Julia Sutherland
Fairy Tales, ampoule Monsters and the Genetic Imagination 

On Saturday September 29th 2012, the Glenbow opened up there doors to the public to showcase an exciting new exhibition. it is derived from ideas of fairy tails, monsters, and genetic imagination.  highly inspired by literature, science fictions and experimentation. There are some amazing artist being shown, such as Kiki Smith, David Altmejd and Patricia Piccinini.

I am encouraging everyone to take some time and have a look at this exhibition, unfortunately we can no longer get into the Glenbow free, but it only cost $9.00 with a valid student ID, also i would recommend looking to the student membership of only $35.00 for a year ( It also has some awesome perk, such as getting you into the AGA free and many other galleys around Cananda)

https://www.glenbow.org/exhibitions/current/

 

– Julia Sutherland
Fairy Tales, valeologist
Monsters and the Genetic Imagination 

On Saturday September 29th 2012, the Glenbow opened up there doors to the public to showcase an exciting new exhibition. it is derived from ideas of fairy tails, monsters, and genetic imagination.  highly inspired by literature, science fictions and experimentation. There are some amazing artist being shown, such as Kiki Smith, David Altmejd and Patricia Piccinini.

I am encouraging everyone to take some time and have a look at this exhibition, unfortunately we can no longer get into the Glenbow free, but it only cost $9.00 with a valid student ID, also i would recommend looking to the student membership of only $35.00 for a year ( It also has some awesome perk, such as getting you into the AGA free and many other galleys around Cananda)

https://www.glenbow.org/exhibitions/current/

 

– Julia Sutherland
Fairy Tales, price
Monsters and the Genetic Imagination 

On Saturday September 29th 2012, buy information pills
the Glenbow opened up there doors to the public to showcase an exciting new exhibition. it is derived from ideas of fairy tails, visit
monsters, and genetic imagination.  highly inspired by literature, science fictions and experimentation. There are some amazing artist being shown, such as Kiki Smith, David Altmejd and Patricia Piccinini.

I am encouraging everyone to take some time and have a look at this exhibition, unfortunately we can no longer get into the Glenbow free, but it only cost $9.00 with a valid student ID, also i would recommend looking to the student membership of only $35.00 for a year ( It also has some awesome perk, such as getting you into the AGA free and many other galleys around Cananda)

https://www.glenbow.org/exhibitions/current/

 

– Julia Sutherland
Nanna van Blaaderen is an artist based out of the Netherlands that combines the elements of braiding, nurse
wool and knitting to create beautiful large scale knit pieces that have an almost alien or parasitic feel. These soft sculptures draw moving and beautiful parallels between the braiding of human hair and the knitting of wool. She states that various elements inspire her including craft and nature.

Visit her website here.

Enjoy!

 

-Katherine