ACAD | Fibre

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Archive for the 'Installation' Category

Naoko Serino, The Fibre Artist

Su Blackwell is a sculptor who work with papers.

She does book sculptures and installations.

I like how delicate her works are. It is detailed and the simple paper color looks so amazing.

Her website:

http://www.sublackwell.co.uk/

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AF64973A-034B-42A3-B2B3-9658ABDCA0B1

2E275673-139C-432B-BF1F-B834F0535A8E

F9C5CBCF-629C-45BD-9969-89B98603CBF8

D6CD5EC4-C014-4C6F-819E-04B5F2CF4B87

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-Jialu

 
Naoko Serino is a Japanese sculpture artist who works with jute.

She was born in 1984, price
and graduated fromKyushu Sangyo Universit, steroids
Faculty of Arts.

I like the simpleness of her works. Also, dosage
how delicate and complex they look at the same time.

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Generating-8-B

 

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Generating-12-2

 

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THE BALL YOU BLOW

↑This one is my favorite piece.

 

Her website in English : http://www.serino.jp/index-en.html

 

-Jialu

Up Next

With my degree coming to a close, stomatology I have been thinking a lot about what direction my practice will take. I have some time to relax before pursuing a career in architecture and I want to ensure I continue making. There are many intersections between art and architecture and I intend to explore them. As a reaction I have created a list of large-scale projects that will keep my mind busy and ambitions high, with the goal that somewhere in the next ten years I’ll make it there.

With that said, here is a piece on my list of inspirations: Triangular Water Pavilion by Jeppe Hein.

This piece is created using two walls of two-way mirrors and a wall of water, creating a triangle. The piece is elevated above a basin of water. Hein describes the effect of the work on his website, where it states, “approaching visitors prompt the descent of the water wall through the activation of a sensor, gaining access to the enclosed space. Upon entry, visitors find themselves surrounded by water and reflective glass, cut off from the exterior by the resurgence of the water jets.”

Now, why didn’t I think of that?

 

-Marcia

Check out Jeppe’s website (also my image source) here: http://www.jeppehein.net/index.php

The Mysterious Weaver: Helena Vento

While working on my transparent cotton weavings, public health I began to research artists who work in a similar way. This search was too specific in nature, and I had a difficult time uncovering artists working with the same concepts and processes as me. However, I did find Helena Vento. When searched, her name brought results of only her Pinterest page, where little information was given as to her work as an artist or how these pieces evolved.

The images included a caption simply stating that they are a transparent weave of linen. Despite the lack of further information, I was inspired by the subtle design of the weavings, the finishing of the edges, and the documentation in everyday spaces. These are the decisions that are most critical in making a weaving successful, and I feel that her weavings are presented very successfully.

                     

This work gave me something to think about as I continue to document my own weavings and strive to present them as successfully as possible.

-Marcia

Image Source/Helena’s Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/helenavento/textiles-by-helena-vento/

“The Only Way Around Is Through”

In a reaction to the loss of a loved one, healthful I decided to switch gears within my practice and focus on creating a work that allowed myself to work through the grief. This work took shape in the form of two weavings which are roughly 2′ x 6′. The weaving process is repetitive and therefore conducive to reflection. I feel this direction provided an outlet for my grieving process, while also providing new insights for my practice.

Weaving, In Progress

Weaving, In Progress

After reflecting on the process, I see that this was an important step towards facing what I did not want to; in the weeks between losing my grandmother and beginning the weaving process, I inadvertently kept myself busy with activities which would not bring up thoughts of the loss. Starting and following through with the weaving put a personal pressure on dealing with every aspect of my loss.

Weaving, In Progress

Weaving, In Progress

The scale of these woven pieces is meant to reflect a figure. I chose to keep everything concerning the weaving minimal, including the weaving structure and colour palette. I did not want any distraction from the conceptual meaning of the pieces. I chose to weave openly so there would be a high level of transparency in the cloth. These pieces stand for what is gone, but not lost. It is an attempt to put to materiality what cannot be seen or touched, but is certainly present. It is an ode to the elusive, deep understanding that the loss of a loved one is only a physical loss.

-Marcia

Idea Exchange

I stumbled upon this organization called Idea Exchange while researching Canadian art galleries.  What’s unique about Idea Exchange is that they have a database of their fibre arts collection, tadalafil which can be accessed online:

https://ideaexchange.org/art/fibre-art-collection

You can browse the collection by region, price type, this site materials, techniques and date, allowing you to find artists and work that may be similar to your own practice. For example, I input a search for Type: Sculpture and Material: Steel Wire and discovered the work of artist Arounna Khounnoraj. Give it a try and see what you find!

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Arouanna Khounnoraj, Untitled Dwelling Series #1, 1998

-Madison

Image courtesy the website

New Maps of Paradise: Eric + Mia

New Maps of Paradise, recipe currently on display at the Nickle Arts Museum at the University of Calgary features the work of artists Eric Moschopedis and Mia Rushton.  Both artists are Calgary based and the work is focused on community based social projects that the two artists have performed collaboratively since 2007.  Moschopedis comes from a theatre background, while Rushton is focused on a craft based practice.

There is a strong presence of textiles present within the show, including the work titled because even under the cover of darkness we are haunted by the past.  This work is an ongoing quilting project that began in 2012.  The artists conducted ten-question interviews with people they were familiar with.  After the interviews, the artists would choose a phrase that they felt represented the interviewee and imagined that phrase in the form of a quilt.

cover of darkness

Another textile work in the show is we knew the future/before disappearing all together.  This work consists of four quilted banners, spelling out the title of the work on either side of four panels.  This piece represents and celebrates youthful hope, demise and the collectivity of the art community.  From one side of the gallery you can read the words, we knew the future, while from the other side of the gallery you can read, before disappearing all together.

Diana Sherlock’s curatorial ability to translate this performative work into a museum display was due to her borrowing cultural geography and ethnological display techniques.  The work requires the viewer to engage and read the accompanying text.  However, the viewer is rewarded with a clear and deep understanding of the meaning of the work upon doing so.

Running until April 2nd, Eric and Mia: New Maps of Paradise is a strong representation of craft, community and the city of Calgary as a whole.

(image courtesy the artists website: http://www.ericandmia.ca/#/because-even-under-the-cover-of-darkness-we-are-haunted-by-the-past/)

 

-Madison

Gather and Be Alone Together Closing Reception

As I continue my colour research I must acknowledge the artists who work with the absence of colour. Two artists I have been looking at are Maximilian Schubert and Piero Manzoni, what is ed who have a very similar aesthetic.

Schubert is an American artist working with materials towards a minimalist end result. One series of his  imagines “painting-as-object”, anabolics mixing sculpture and painting elements into one. The pieces are done in an all white palette which are then left titled Untitled. Another series inspired by drawing, treat uses brass to create sculptural or 3D drawings. Information on him and his art is limited on line, while lots of images are available.

Schubert 1Schubert 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Format #14- #16, 2013. Brass.

Untitled, 2013. Cast acrylic polyurethane, epoxy, fibreglass, acrylic and vinyl paint.

Manzoni was an Italian artist living from 1933-1963. He is the artist we all know as the guy who canned his own feces and sold it as art. However, what I am interested in is his sculptural, monochromatic paintings. Similar to Schubert’s pieces, Manzoni drew his inspiration from questioning traditional artistic practices, experimenting with new materials and really playing into conceptual art.

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Achrome, 1960. Kaolin on canvas.

Achrome, 1962. Fibreglass on velvet-covered wood.

 

See Schubert’s work and writing on it here:

http://www.mutualart.com/Exhibitions/Maximilian-Schubert/3AC64AE484AAC775#Info

https://www.artsy.net/artist/maximilian-schubert/works

 

See Manzoni’s work and writing on it here:

http://www.moma.org/collection/artists/3741?=undefined&page=1

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/piero-manzoni-1571

 

-Emily
Please join us on Thursday, physician
January 21 from 5 to 7PM at John Fluevog Calgary (207 8 Ave SW) for the closing reception of Gather and Be Alone Together.

This group exhibition features the work of seven fibre artists from Alberta College of Art + Design. Gather and Be Alone Together explores the community of craft and the solitude of creation. The works show a wide range of fibre techniques including weaving, surgeon
embroidery, infection
knitting and cloth dyeing. Many of the works exemplify the importance of the hand-made and explore the significance of this in today’s society. Works in the show present us with quiet reflections of the artist’s meditations and hold the memories of their process in the creation of the work.

The show takes its name from a quote by Ann Hamilton, a contemporary artist who draws inspiration from one of the most well known textile artists in history, Anni Albers. A nod to both past and present, you are invited to Gather and Be Alone Together.

 

Showcard Front

 

Visiting Artist: Rowland Ricketts

Fibre Fortnight is coming up next semester, approved so I thought I would share the work of Rowland Ricketts, our visiting artist this year.

Ricketts trained in Japan, learning how to farm and dye with indigo.  His work uses traditional techniques and natural processes to create woven and dyed works of art.  Ricketts also creates large installation pieces, working with the gallery space to create an environment for the viewer.

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I am Ai, We are Ai – Warehouse Installation, Japan, 2012

Rickett’s artist statement begins beautifully with an explination of his process and feelings towards his materials.  He states, “The smell of an indigo vat just as it begins fermenting and springs to life is one of ripeness; a moment of rich potentiality when, as a maker, I momentarily stand between the history of the materials and processes that helped me get the indigo thus far and the promise of all the works that the vat is still yet to realize.”  

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Past Present, Ohio, 2010

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Red Aligned and Centered, Yellow

Rowland Ricketts will be showing his work at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Oregon from January 29, 2016 until June 04, 2016.  That means that if we go on our grad trip to Portland, a wide range of his work will be available for us to view.

All images were taken from Rickett’s website: http://www.rickettsindigo.com/

-Madison

 

Lygia Pape: Thread, Thread, and More Thread

Lygia Pape was a Brazilian sculpture and installation artist. She was born in 1927 and passed in May of 2004. Although it was found on Wikipedia in my search for some background info on Pape, unhealthy her work is described as being “a vehicle for existential sensorial, capsule and psychological life experiences, urologist much of it based in geometry and relying on both the intellectual and physical participation of the viewer.” Despite the source of this quote, I find it to be critically true in the work that I have researched of Lydia’s.

Lygia Pape. Web #1, C, 2008.

Lygia Pape. Web #1, C, 2008.

Naturally, the piece I am most attracted to is made of golden thread. It is a very delicate piece of work, giving the illusion of a beam of light. The thread has a beautiful natural transparency.

Lygia Pape. Web #1, C, 2008.

Formally, this work captures everything I am interested in within my own work. The use of light is strategic and the sculptures pose an invasion of space, which gives the opportunity for the viewer to walk through and around them. It appears that Pape had been working with this idea for years, as she started on a smaller scale in the late 70’s and worked her way up to a slightly larger 2002 piece.

Lygia Pape. Web #1, B, 2002.

Lygia Pape. Web #1, B, 2002.

Her selection of thread is intriguing and mirrors materials that I would love to try. Up to this point, I have decided to work primarily in grayscale. For sake of investigating conceptual direction and ironing out my practice, this has been beneficial. However, her use of copper and golden thread is exactly the direction I would like to go in the future.

Lygia Pape. Web 1A, 1979.

Lygia Pape. Web 1A, 1979.

Seeing Pape’s progression from 1979 to 2008 reminds me that I do not need to be making masterpieces right now. A natural progression will come with exploration and practice.

-Marcia

 

View her website here: http://www.lygiapape.org.br/en/

Drawing: Process or Product?

I decided to do a fun post and just throw a bunch of personal inspiration photos at you guys. I’m sorry in advance, clinic this is going to be a lot!

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I took these photos in the cemetery of Fossombrone, Italy (my grandpas hometown – pictured above). It sits in a valley with a river running through the middle and hills on all sides. The graveyard sits on the side of one of these hills where a winding dirt road leads to the towns church at the top. The road to the top is filled with stone and marble markers which can be prayed at like a rosary. I forgot to take a photo of these, but they are filled with religious memorabilia and candles which are lit by locals before special masses.

(The iron gates to the cemetery were made by my great grandfather!)

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Here’s a few photos of what the cemetery grounds look like

Someones tomb was open, it appeared that the room was being prepared for someone. I snuck inside and looked around

 

The tombstones are so inspirational to me. The textures, colours, mosses, and eroded history are so beautiful. The people there don’t alter the stones once they have been placed, so for many of them: all or most of the information on the people has been either lost or very well hidden.

The tombstones decay over time and I think it’s really beautiful how this mimics the body. It is sad to think about how time can erase memory, but in a way it’s freeing.

I went for a walk through the Queens Park Cemetery in Calgary a few weeks ago. I took a few interesting photos.. The stones weren’t as degraded and worn as the previous ones (despite many of them being similar in age), but they were beautiful nonetheless.

As I was walking through, I happened to pass someone’s cross on fire. There were two city workers there as I approached who were trying to figure out the best way to extinguish the fire (because there were a lot of plastic objects around the grave and containers full of fragrant oils). It was really startling to see this happen, especially because the fire had been caused by a visitor leaving incense burning below the cross. It was also really strange to meet two strangers and admittedly gawk at the scene together for a moment. I can’t really explain how this made me feel.. but you all can see for yourselves-

OKAY this is the end, I promise! Goodnight all

-sandrine


Recently, this
I began working on elaborate drawings of the large-scale work I hope to create. This process has provided clarity of my ideas, infertility
strengthened my writing about my work, and allowed myself time to contemplate what I am working on and why.

I am interested in this preliminary work becoming part of the final product. It is present in the final work for obvious reasons, but I am contemplating the effectiveness (or lack there of) in presenting these drawings as a piece on their own. Although the drawings would represent the same work that is in the room, I feel it could add an interesting additional dimension to the work. Would this result in too much information, or an overload of the same work? This is the question I am contemplating with myself. Regardless, I have found release in putting time into these drawings so that they are their own work of art.

Marcia Fisher Installation Drawings

Marcia Fisher Installation Drawings

I began to research artists who work with drawings in a similar way. Edith Derdyk is an artist who not only works with thread in mass amounts, but creates drawings which she shows to the public as well. Her book, Desenhos, is fascinating because it not only shows images of her work but all of the plans for them as well. However, I do not believe that she shows these drawings as their own work of art.

Edith Derdyk Installation Drawings

Edith Derdyk Installation Drawings

Whether these drawings are to be shown or not, I have found them to be a great method of getting excited about and prepared for my projects.

-Marcia

 

Visit Edith’s website here: http://www.edithderdyk.com.br/portu/menu_serie_i.asp?cod_Artista=1

Soft Is Strong

Still unclear of my future after ACAD, more about selling my weavings has always been an option. Yesterday at work I had a conversation with a client about textiles. As a mother with young children, she mentioned a brand called ‘Uppymama’. Advice or knowledge about the textile world is not a popular response I receive after describing my degree, so I was extremely excited to look up this company she was raving about.

Uppymama is a company which hand weaves and finishes baby wraps, and is based out of Alberta.  They appear to be woven out of 100% cotton, going from the hands of the weaver to a seamstress who finishes the edges. The wraps sell quickly, but as my client added, the real money is in the re-selling. The only thing I didn’t like about this company is that they aren’t as excited about the woven material, and market it solely for its purpose, “this is not a piece of fabric.  This is a baby carrier”. However, they do give lots of credit to the fibre artist!

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Uppymama is a great example of a creating a functional art object in high demand with the right materials, knowledge and marketing skills.

Visit their website here:

Welcome to Uppymama

–Emily

 

 
In an effort to condense my ideas and make them applicable to my practice, pharmacy
I have began to narrow in on suspension as a way to affect a public space or gallery space. From the beginning of this exploration I was interested in tension of materials; although a suspended piece can never actually float in space, bronchitis
therefore removing some obvious tension, store the placement and angle can have an effect on how it is viewed and how the materials have a conversation with one another.

I feel excited about this path, and also feel resolved in having a more succinct idea. However, I will continue to see how the process of making affects they way I speak to the work.

Suspended Stone Circle II

I have started looking at a couple textile artists who beautifully utilize suspension. One that stood out to me in particular was Ken Unsworth. He is an Australian sculptural and installation artist. The work that caught my eye was a series of suspended rocks, held by a massive amount of thread. He is interested in creating sculptures that play on memory. The experience happens either in person with the memory that is taken away from seeing the work, or through a rumour of a memory. This gives the work an ephemerality that I admire.Suspended Stone Circle II, detail

The tension created in this work is exactly what I love: an ode to the soft being strong.

-Marcia

 

Work Cited:

“Suspended Stone Circle II, (1974-1977, 1988) by Ken Unsworth.” Art Gallery NSW. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2015.

Felting: Discouragement, Perseverance, Recovery

Palace Yurt, <a href=

medications detail” width=”470″ height=”351″ /> Janice Arnold. Palace Yurt, here detail. Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, seek New York. 2009.

I feel conflicted about felt. I tend to either find it extremely appealing or repulsive, and sometimes there is a very fine line between the two. After our midterm critique, I was feeling a bit discouraged and second-guessing my felt theme because my first piece didn’t turn out how I had imagined it. All of my classmates were very encouraging, however, and I decided to stick with it.

Read more

Cactus Curious

I recently visited artist Claire Coutts in the Gallerie Gaulin. Her show: Cactus Therapy was a curious and colourful exhibition. It prompted me to reflection on art as play and dream about travelling. Claire is a print major at ACAD and she is also the director of the Marion Nicoll Gallery. We chatted about all sorts of things that informed this questionnaire I made for her to fill out.

Claire1

Claire2

Thanks for hanging out Claire! xo

– Carly

A Take on Ann Hamilton

Searching “adorning the body” the first thing that comes up is Egyptian culture. Maybe this is a good place to look; in actual history. Different cultures around the world. If you think about it, search lots of places have different standards of dress. In India they wear bright colors and use Henna.  African tribes that stretch their ears as big as big as possible. Tribes who stretch their necks using metal rings. Even in china where they bind feet. Aboriginal culture where they hand embroider all of their own costumes and make their own head dresses. Now that I am thinking about other cultures, therapy it really seems like its just western culture that doesnt dress up or dress in exuberant colors. Maybe people living in Canada and the USA only adorn the body for special occasions because all of the resources and shopping malls and restaurants have made us lazy. I’m not sure where this is going but I feel like I need to search books on styles of dress in different countries throughout the years.

  • Chelsey Wensveen

Through the making of creatures familiar and yet unknown I sought to find other artists that harnessed ideas of the unreal living in the world of the real. I happened upon an article from The Journal of Modern Craft called A Parasitic Craft: Taxidermy in the Art of Tessa Farmer. To me taxidermy holds a special place in the world of real life fantasy, pharm
as it is ever trying to convince its audience that the subject matter before them is in fact alive, visit this
giving way to false moister on the nose and eyes, meningitis
dynamic poses and providing substance where only a hide remains.

essa Farmer, Little Savages, 2007. Taxidermied fox, wasp nest, bones, insects, animals, plant roots, commission of the Natural History Museum, London, in collaboration with Danielle Arnaud, Parabola. © Tessa Farmer, London. Photo credit: Sean Daniels.

Tessa Farmer, Little Savages, 2007. Taxidermied fox, wasp nest, bones, insects, animals, plant roots, commission of the Natural History Museum, London, in collaboration with Danielle Arnaud, Parabola. © Tessa Farmer, London. Photo credit: Sean Daniels.

To me the work of Tessa Farmer is so interesting because she creates intricate worlds presumably unnoticed to our eyes but within our reality. Taking ownership of taxidermy not to uphold its tradition of preservation but picking it apart create something new while still holding true to nature.

Here is a video of Tess Famer talking about her work Little Savages and the Natural History Museum.

Link to the Article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.2752/174967714X14111311182802
It can also be found in the Acad School Library in The Journal of Modern Craft
-Amy
Work Cited:
Lange-Berndt, Petra. “A Parasitic Craft: Taxidermy in the Art of Tessa Farmer.” The Journal of Modern Craft 7.3 (2014): 267–284. Taylor and Francis+NEJM. Web.

 

 

Through the making of creatures familiar and yet unknown I sought to find other artists that harnessed ideas of the unreal living in the world of the real. I happened upon an article from The Journal of Modern Craft called A Parasitic Craft: Taxidermy in the Art of Tessa Farmer. To me taxidermy holds a special place in the world of real life fantasy, pilule
as it is ever trying to convince its audience that the subject matter before them is in fact alive, giving way to false moister on the nose and eyes, dynamic poses and providing substance where only a hide remains.

essa Farmer, Little Savages, 2007. Taxidermied fox, wasp nest, bones, insects, animals, plant roots, commission of the Natural History Museum, London, in collaboration with Danielle Arnaud, Parabola. © Tessa Farmer, London. Photo credit: Sean Daniels.

Tessa Farmer, Little Savages, 2007. Taxidermied fox, wasp nest, bones, insects, animals, plant roots, commission of the Natural History Museum, London, in collaboration with Danielle Arnaud, Parabola. © Tessa Farmer, London. Photo credit: Sean Daniels.

To me the work of Tessa Farmer is so interesting because she creates intricate worlds presumably unnoticed to our eyes but within our reality. Taking ownership of taxidermy not to uphold its tradition of preservation in everlasting life but picking it apart create something new while still holding true to the nitty gritty of nature, parasitism and decay included.

Here is a video of Tess Famer talking about her work Little Savages and the Natural History Museum.

Link to the Article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.2752/174967714X14111311182802
It can also be found in the Acad School Library in The Journal of Modern Craft
-Amy

Work Cited:
Lange-Berndt, Petra. “A Parasitic Craft: Taxidermy in the Art of Tessa Farmer.” The Journal of Modern Craft 7.3 (2014): 267–284. Taylor and Francis+NEJM. Web.

 

 

Through the making of creatures familiar and yet unknown I sought to find other artists that harnessed ideas of the unreal living in the world of the real. I happened upon an article from The Journal of Modern Craft called A Parasitic Craft: Taxidermy in the Art of Tessa Farmer. To me taxidermy holds a special place in the world of real life fantasy, pharmacy
as it is ever trying to convince its audience that the subject matter before them is in fact alive, giving way to false moister on the nose and eyes, dynamic poses and providing substance where only a hide remains.

essa Farmer, Little Savages, 2007. Taxidermied fox, wasp nest, bones, insects, animals, plant roots, commission of the Natural History Museum, London, in collaboration with Danielle Arnaud, Parabola. © Tessa Farmer, London. Photo credit: Sean Daniels.

Tessa Farmer, Little Savages, 2007. Taxidermied fox, wasp nest, bones, insects, animals, plant roots, commission of the Natural History Museum, London, in collaboration with Danielle Arnaud, Parabola. © Tessa Farmer, London. Photo credit: Sean Daniels.

To me the work of Tessa Farmer is so interesting because she creates intricate worlds presumably unnoticed to our eyes but within our reality. Taking ownership of taxidermy not to uphold its tradition of preservation in everlasting life but picking it apart create something new while still holding true to the nitty gritty of nature, parasitism and decay included.

Here is a video of Tess Famer talking about her work Little Savages and the Natural History Museum.

Link to the Article: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.2752/174967714X14111311182802
It can also be found in the Acad School Library in The Journal of Modern Craft
-Amy

Work Cited:
Lange-Berndt, Petra. “A Parasitic Craft: Taxidermy in the Art of Tessa Farmer.” The Journal of Modern Craft 7.3 (2014): 267–284. Taylor and Francis+NEJM. Web.

 

 
Though I have many artists who I look up to, Syphilis
Ann Hamilton stands firmly as one of the most inspirational. Ann is a widely recognized artist for her large-scale multi media installations. She received her BFA in textile design from the University of Kansas in 1979, medications
and went on to complete her MFA in sculpture from the Yale School of Art in 1985. Ann’s work has a continuous element of delicacy and an ethereal quality that I am inherently drawn to. Her work has a tendency to be meditative, patient
which I believe may be the root of why she stands as a strong figure in my artistic practice.

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

The Event of a Thread is a well-known exhibition that took place in New York. I have chosen to speak specifically to this work simply because it is the most applicable to my practice at this time. In this work, the space is transformed by a massive piece of cloth which is connected to swings throughout the space. When used, the swings cause the cloth to raise and lower with the movement. This piece is an effective example of reforming a space so that it is re-considered by the audience. Although Hamilton has the resources for work of this scale, the conceptual backbone of the viewer’s experience is what remains inspirational to my practice.

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

 

You can view an Art21 video on The Event of a Thread here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fJ4umqXGjM

And visit Ann’s website and read a beautiful statement on The Event of a Thread here: http://www.annhamiltonstudio.com/projects/armory.html

 

-Marcia

Material Satisfaction

One of my favourite fibre artist’s of all time is Roanna Wells.  I stumbled upon her work on instagram and immediately fell in love.  She embroiders black thread onto cream coloured wool to represent an overhead view of crowd formations at various events throughout history.  She calls this body of work Interpersonal Spatial Arrangements.  Wells describes this work by saying, recipeInterpersonal Spatial Arrangements look at the way in which we, hemophilia as a human species, have the power to express common thought, opinion and appreciation through the act of coming together to form crowds”.  You can find more of her work on her website, http://www.roannawells.co.uk/

SONY DSC

Le Tour de France, 2014

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World Youth Day, 2011

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Diamond Jubilee Celebrations, 2014

-Madison

Getting ready for midterm, order
I look around my studio and see two things: wood and white. I have followed a theme of unique woods and white-washed textiles in an effort to work with delicacy and a degree of minimalism. I chose to work with beautiful wood from abandoned grain elevators, cialis as well as bendable plywood. I kept my textile materials refined to cotton in order to create a unanimous material base.

This inherent attraction to wood-working must come from its extensive structural history. Although I continue the struggle to find the most effective way to capture the audience’s interest, meanwhile I am as aesthetically pleased as personally possible.

Wood of the Prairie

Wood of the Prairies.

-Marcia

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