Seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

2017 Mini poster

The ACAD Fibre program is seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

Funds raised support visiting artists, troche workshops and student-initiated projects in the Fibre program. Students, pilule alumni, ed faculty and friends are encouraged to donate work for the show.

Works restricted to 12” in any direction in all mediums will be accepted.

All work must be accompanied by a submission form and dropped off at the Fibre Program office, Rm 414 by Monday, January 30th, 2017.

The Miniature Show will be displayed from February 6 – 16th. The closing event will be held Thursday, February 16th from 5.30 – 8 pm in Room 371 with closing bids in at 7.30 pm.

For more information or a submission form contact kellie.reid@acad.ca or asma.ismail@acad.ca

 

New Maps of Paradise: Eric + Mia

New Maps of Paradise, recipe currently on display at the Nickle Arts Museum at the University of Calgary features the work of artists Eric Moschopedis and Mia Rushton.  Both artists are Calgary based and the work is focused on community based social projects that the two artists have performed collaboratively since 2007.  Moschopedis comes from a theatre background, while Rushton is focused on a craft based practice.

There is a strong presence of textiles present within the show, including the work titled because even under the cover of darkness we are haunted by the past.  This work is an ongoing quilting project that began in 2012.  The artists conducted ten-question interviews with people they were familiar with.  After the interviews, the artists would choose a phrase that they felt represented the interviewee and imagined that phrase in the form of a quilt.

cover of darkness

Another textile work in the show is we knew the future/before disappearing all together.  This work consists of four quilted banners, spelling out the title of the work on either side of four panels.  This piece represents and celebrates youthful hope, demise and the collectivity of the art community.  From one side of the gallery you can read the words, we knew the future, while from the other side of the gallery you can read, before disappearing all together.

Diana Sherlock’s curatorial ability to translate this performative work into a museum display was due to her borrowing cultural geography and ethnological display techniques.  The work requires the viewer to engage and read the accompanying text.  However, the viewer is rewarded with a clear and deep understanding of the meaning of the work upon doing so.

Running until April 2nd, Eric and Mia: New Maps of Paradise is a strong representation of craft, community and the city of Calgary as a whole.

(image courtesy the artists website: http://www.ericandmia.ca/#/because-even-under-the-cover-of-darkness-we-are-haunted-by-the-past/)

 

-Madison

Weaving an Heirloom: Romance and Reality

The Canadian Crafts Federation in partnership with the PEI Crafts Council hosted the 3rd Annual National Craft Symposium, for sale
titled “Heirloom”. Part of the PEI2014 cultural celebrations, ask the Symposium featured speakers from the craft field discussing the merits, shop
the history, and the contemporary aspects of heirloom objects. This talk features our special guest speaker, Jane Kidd, a tapestry artist and retired arts educator now living on Salt Spring island in British Columbia.

ACAD FIbre at Maker Faire this Saturday!

Hi everyone, info

Here is a sneak preview of some pictures from the Contextural Fibre Co-operative Groups Show currently being shown in the Marion Nicoll Gallery, physiotherapist Room 371 & the ACAD Storefront Jubilee Window. The opening reception is tonight from 6-8pm. 

This past June 2014 I participated in the residency program and here is what I found out about this Calgary based Fibre co-operative group. The Contextural Residency Program is a great meeting place for ACAD students to come together with ACAD Alumni, teachers and other like- minded artists. Residency members have the printing and the emulsion room for use , you also get a private studio area (hours are 7am-11pm).I did find that most people have differing schedules and it was quieter than I anticipated.

What I’ve enjoyed most about the residency program has been seeing the culmination of everyones work put into the Organic Matters Show. Its truly a great opportunity for students to participate in a show alongside some very talented artists. I almost have too many favourite pieces to mention, but I especially LOVED  Jolie Bird’s “Le pick- up” painting. Her mastery in combining painting with thread is superb and something that I’m striving for in my own work. Ginni Armitage’s “A Day Dream,” really did feel dreamy, she makes working with paper look easy.

I’ve added a link if anyone is interested about Contextural

I’ll see you tonight at the opening reception!

-Karin McGinn
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This Saturday, generic Jolie Bird and I will be at Maker Faire. We are excited to be representing ACAD at the event and will be sharing some methods for dyeing wool and cotton using plant dyes.

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Some of you may know that Jolie initiated the Fibre Dye Garden this summer growing sunflowers coreopsis, orthopedist
marigold, woad and rhubarb. Above are the woad leaves she harvested drying in the weaving studio. The dye garden is an exciting initiative that allows us to highlight the importance of sustainable practices in the Fibre studios at ACAD.

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Over the last few days Jolie and I have been preparing cloth and some yarns using various mordants including rhubarb leaves which release oxalic acid, a useful additive that tends to deepen the colour especially for yellows and reds.

10444019_1526187024261349_4534380945408370467_n

photo 1

Most plant dyes are adjective, meaning that a metallized salt or other substance is required to affix the colour. Some of the process can be done at room temperature but others require gentle simmering for a short period of time.

photo 2

With planning it is possible to use little to no energy in this process. We are currently researching other methods including solar dyeing.

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So if you are curious come down to Telus Spark and drop by our booth at Maker Faire anytime between 10 am and 6 pm. See you soon!

photo

– Mackenzie

Contextural Residency Show “Organic Matters” Opening Reception Tonight 6-8!

Hi everyone, information pills

Here is a sneak preview of some pictures from the Contextural Fibre Co-operative Groups Show currently being shown in the Marion Nicoll Gallery, viagra Room 371 & the ACAD Storefront Jubilee Window. The opening reception is tonight from 6-8pm. 

This past June 2014 I participated in the residency program and here is what I found out about this Calgary based Fibre co-operative group. The Contextural Residency Program is a great meeting place for ACAD students to come together with ACAD Alumni, teachers and other like- minded artists. Residency members have the printing and the emulsion room for use , you also get a private studio area (hours are 7am-11pm).I did find that most people have differing schedules and it was quieter than I anticipated.

What I’ve enjoyed most about the residency program has been seeing the culmination of everyones work put into the Organic Matters Show. Its truly a great opportunity for students to participate in a show alongside some very talented artists. I almost have too many favourite pieces to mention, but I especially LOVED  Jolie Bird’s “Le pick- up” painting. Her mastery in combining painting with thread is superb and something that I’m striving for in my own work. Ginni Armitage’s “A Day Dream,” really did feel dreamy, she makes working with paper look easy.

I’ve added a link if anyone is interested about Contextural

I’ll see you tonight at the opening reception!

-Karin McGinn

ACAD Fibre Fortnight, Mini Silent Auction + Underwater Basket Weaving!

 

ACAD’s Fibre Program and the School of Craft + Emerging Media are pleased to present a series of events between March 11 and 20, sildenafil 2014 celebrating the talents of current students, phimosis alumni and faculty.

Fibre Fortnight Exhibition
This exhibition takes over the entire ACAD Main Mall and features student work at all levels across a variety of media including mixed media sculpture, surface design, weaving, video and more.

Miniature Silent Auction
Our yearly Fibre program fundraiser features small, collectible pieces donated by ACAD students, alumni, faculty and staff. Bidding is ongoing and will close March 20 at 6 pm. Funds raised support Fibre’s visiting artist program, student initiated projects and the Fibre graduating class. So bid early and bid often. 

Closing Reception + Alumni Panel
Finally, please join us from 5 to 9 pm for the Closing Reception for both exhibitions in the ACAD main mall (3rd floor); and a special alumni panel discussion hosted by the School of Craft + Emerging Media. Underwater Basket Weaving: Risk, Entrepreneurship and Strategies for Success will engage six ACAD alumni in conversation around their successes and overall experiences as entrepreneurs in a range of creative industries. Confirmed alumni panelists are:

Mackenzie Kelly-Frère, Associate Chair, School of Craft + Emerging Media (and ACAD Fibre alumnus) will facilitate the discussion. The panel starts at 7 pm in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre.

All are welcome and this event is open to the public.  We look forward to seeing you there!

Tara’s Baby Shower

 

Martin4

Fine Looking Bunch of Women

pastel, this web etching, lithography on paper

Collection of Checotah Creek Indian Community

Bobby C. Martin

Bobby C. Martin, a painter, has many of the same ideas in his art work that I find in mine. He uses old family photographs to inspire his practice. Martin works mainly with oil paint, but also uses techniques such as encaustic, acrylic, block printing, and etching. Although our mediums are completely different our concepts are very much the same. In his artist statement he says:

“I base many of my works on photographs that belonged to my full blood Indian grandmother, my aunts, my mother—images found in shoeboxes, forgotten in the bottoms of drawers, or found among the tattered black pages of old leather-bound photo albums. The photographs have very personal meanings for me as the artist, but I have found also that there is an almost universal recognition among viewers of a sense of history and identity, evoking memories of their own family’s past.

My hope is for my art to become like an old family photograph—perhaps cherished, perhaps stuffed in a box in the attic—but always able to evoke memories every time it is viewed.”

Martin1

Mom & Mary Ann (The Redhead)

oil and collage on canvas

48 x 72 in.

Martin3

Sunday Best

oil on canvas

24 x 36 in.

Martin2

Granny & Pa

oil on canvas

Courtesy Dr. J.W. Wiggins Native American Art Collection

 

I am drawn to Martin’s work because of his yearning to learn about his family, and himself. While creating new pieces, he says he is able to learn about the people within the photos. He says “it makes you really think about what they were like and what their lives were like.” With my work I try and do the same thing. I am a very family oriented person, and I think this is what drew me to the photographs in the first place. I have a yearning to find out about my ancestors, whether they be alive or passed away. I feel like if I am able to learn about them, I can in turn learn about myself.

 

References: http://www.bobbycmartin.com/Bobby_C._Martins_Art_Site.html

 

 

-Amy

 

 
2014-02-27 13.14.09 2014-02-27 13.17.41 2014-02-27 13.28.39 2014-02-27 13.12.38 2014-02-27 13.11.23 2014-02-27 13.10.42 2014-02-27 13.10.25 2014-02-27 13.08.18 2014-02-27 13.08.08 2014-02-27 13.07.52thanks everyone for coming to the baby shower slash potluck for Tara. if you could not make it you missed out on a fun afternoon with good food, this site
good company, and good conversation! the baby basket for the adopt a family should still be available if anyone has anything to donate.

2014 Miniature Show Silent Auction + Exhibition

Bronwyn Schuster is a young Canadian artist whose work spans several mediums. She primarily paints, troche and within the past year has been involved with an artist residency in Quebec, dentist and is attending The Swedish Academy of Realist Art. Her works touches upon several subjects, including self portraiture, and work that can be described as fantastical. She has created jewelry, art dolls, paintings large and small, commercial work, and is an avid member of several art scenes.

The Scarf- Self Portrait (Bronwyn Schuster, 2013)

(Question) How would you describe yourself as an artist?

(Answer) First question and you’ve already stumped me. I figure a lot of the artist I am is still trapped inside of me, as I lack some of the skills to express what it is that I imagine. I also don’t really know where me begins and artist ends. Mostly though, I am a tea drinking, generally happy, slightly ethereal, wannabe realist painter who uses surrealism far to much as a crutch when things go wrong.

The Swedish Academy of Realist Art                           Photo credit: Bronwyn Schuster

What is the school you are attending, and why did you choose to go there?

The Swedish Academy of Realist (aka SARA {aka Atelier Stockholm}) is a magical school that will pull at the heartstrings of any golden age nostalgist. SARA is built on the tradition of European fine arts ateliers where master painters would take on apprentices, teaching them techniques through a rigid academic approach to figure drawing and painting. Quite simply, we spend the days hunched over Charles Bargue lithographs, copying line for line and shade for shade is precise detail. This is broken up in the day with live model drawing, anatomy and materials lectures. After graduating from lithographs you move onto copying casts, then onto oil painting and still lifes. It’s a three year course, and 8 hour days. Possibly the most intensive immersion into fine arts you could find. Which is precisely why I chose to attend. There is something still striking and haunting about the oil paintings of old. They were true masters of their technique, and it’s not something you can learn at just any school. At SARA I know I am learning in relatively the same fashion that the masters did themselves, and I can even trace the lineage of my teachers (it goes back to Leonardo da Vinci!) I am a pure romanticist too. I really couldn’t imagine attending any other kind of school.

Inspired- Egon Schiele (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

What inspires or influences your different styles? For example, what inspired your Animal Magnetism series, and your self portrait series?

My inspirations are in a constant flux and change. At the moment I have noticed a strong influence from my fellow classmates, and at the same time the Swedish style of living. But, I find it difficult to explain my inspiration because I am such a visual person. You’ll just have to come over for tea so that I can show you. I can, however, explain how my self portrait series came about. One fine winter morning, out in the prairies of Saskatchewan, I found myself very frustrated with my particular art skill level and inability to paint portraits. This was the time before I had means to attend SARA, so I took it upon myself to research up artists I admired, delve into their life story and then try to replicate their style. I figured trying to mimic their techniques would teach me something, and choosing to paint myself gave me both 24/7 access to a live model (who I did not have to impress) and it insured that I wasn’t directly copying a painters art work. Thus my “Inspired By” self portrait series was born. I may have also had some influence by my photographer friend Susan Knight who had started a similar project in digital media. The animal people though? I can’t explain that. I have no clue where that came from …

Red Riding Hood (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Have you ever experienced artists’ block? What do you do to counter it?

Ah, artists block. I know you well. Artist block comes in many forms for me. There is technical artist block for starters. It’s when I’ve got the ideas, the subject, the materials and everything in front of me, and then I start working and EVERYTHING feels wrong. No matter what I do, I can’t replicate what I see in front of me or in my mind. It might be the most frustrating form of artists block for me. Usually it happens right on a huge learning curve, and you just have to power through it. But sometimes it’s good to take a break. Make something nice to drink and try again later. Generally I have to remember that it is not as bad as I think it is. Creative artists block usually happens due to lack of sleep. That’s when I rest and let the pressure go. If it lasts more than two days, then I’m just being lazy. Creativity is a muscle. You have to exercise it. Try new things. Write. Research, and have interesting conversations with people. Last of all artists blocks is procrastination. This one is sneaky. It comes in the form of “But I need to do this first!” Be that: make food, finish a chapter of a book, check facebook, do your taxes, organize something, go to the store, research something, watch a youtube video (who are you trying to kid). These are not important (okay, maaaybe food and taxes are) always put aside time for art and always use that time for art. As my friend Vincent always likes to say “What do we say to the god of unproductivity? … Not today!”

Artist block is not a valid excuse. Go make some art!

Inspired- Leonor Fini (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Bronwyn’s artwork et al can be found here: http://bronwynschuster.com/

 

-Emmelia Taylor

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, pharm
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 

The Reparative Impulse

 

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, tadalafil
but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

I found this and had to share it – especially for anyone else who is going through the “fourth year-final semester” angst. This kinda just says it all for me – and is a bit apropos for the readings that we are doing in Fibre 451, pilule
Grad class.

Hemorrhoids
Sept. 23, 2013″ src=”http://fibre.acadnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Sartre-Recipes-New-Yorker-470×422.jpeg” width=”470″ height=”422″ /> New Yorker Magazine, Sept. 23, 2013

 

Pick a pencil. Any pencil. Are you sure that is the right one? Maybe a pen.Or a brush. Grab some paper. What colour paper? Maybe you want a canvas. Or try organza. What colour warp? But are you sure you want to weave this? Take another look. What about mixed media for that. How do you know? etc.

lol. Christine

 

 

 

 
2014 MiniatureHello ACAD Community, read more

The annual Miniature Show Silent Auction and Exhibition is calling for submissions!

The Miniature Show will be exhibited as part of Fibre Fortnight March 10th-21st, cheap in the Main Mall. The silent auction will run until Thursday the 20th, physician
final bids at 6:30pm. All proceeds from the auction will be donated to Fibre Department for funding visiting artists and student enrichment.

Submitted artworks must be of 12”x12″x12″ or smaller, of any medium and subject matter. Artworks are accepted from all departments, students, faculty and alumni.

To submit work please email the title, medium, size, artist name, and a short description of any details by February 28th. All artwork can be delivered to the Fibre Department March 10th -14th.

Please email submissions to Natalie Lauchlan at natalie.lauchlan@acad.ca

Cheers,

The Fibre Department

Mackenzie Kelly-Frère | Frequency

It is indeed that time – time to bring it all together and sift through what one has gathered from the term ( and terms that led into this past one). I decided to take some classes outside my major to further my practical knowledge and hopefully open up my mind to processes that could inform my work. Taking Printmaking with Gary Olson and Drawing with Miruna Dragan were two extremely wise decisions – perhaps not for my time management of the term but certainly to grow and push some boundaries.

Miruna’s class allowed for some huge learning curves ( animation, salve wall drawings, look
automatic drawing, and pushing personal potential). We were encouraged to bring our own practices into class, but also to explore other avenues into resolving class assignments. The small weavings pictured below I named “KOAN” as they were part of the drawings from the subconscious that we did for our first project, and were a kind of secret statement from me to me.  I rolled the images wet, and wove them into triangular wall hangings on the Archie Brennan pipe loom.They are rolled little secrets, that project out from the wall, guarding their thoughts.

"Koan", Paper, bamboo, cotton twine ikat dyed.
“Koan”, Paper, bamboo, cotton twine ikat dyed.

 

The large wall drawing was a project that entailed a student to draw, exhibit and then paint over their image in three days. My painting ( as pictured below) is a topographical map of a female body. The female body has often been used as a metaphor for the earth: as Gaia, as Mother Earth. The Spanish and the French use the feminine to describe the earth ( la tierra, la terre).It has been a body to be conquered, both literally and figuratively. I am interested in the environment and what we as human doings have done to her.  I loved the huge canvas of the wall, and am saddened when I consider how long a tapestry would take to cover the same territory. My experiment with female topography has led into other work.

 

"Topography of Her", Acrylic paint, charcoal.
“Topography of Her”, Acrylic paint, charcoal.
Detail, "Topography of Her".
Detail, “Topography of Her”.

DETAIL UPPER TORSO

In my print making class I am experimenting with linocut prints, and am cutting some sample imagery for my next tapestries. I am considering a series of local inappropriately named mountains to draw attention to the fact that it is time to rename and reconsider the history that allows for these mountains to continue to be listed on maps by their colloquial terms.

 

Lino cut for tapestry image
Lino cut for tapestry image

Here is the cut plate of a local mountain that may be used for my next tapestry series. I will start printing those tomorrow. I still have a couple of days left to get some stuff done, right?

 

-Christine Thomson
 

As a few of you may already know, unhealthy
I will be spending June, illness
July and August of 2014 on residency at the Icelandic Textile Centre in Blönduòs, site Iceland. The residency is uniquely for textile artists, and I highly recommend all of you apply. Facilities include:

Weaving Rooms: They have looms of two differents sizes: 80 and 140cm. They are 4, 6 or 8 shafts Counter-balanced. Residents have full access to weaving equipment: large selection of reeds, warping reel, distaff holders, shuttles, yarn reels etc.

Dyeing Rooms: It is a full scale natural dyeing room.  Provided with a small movable oven, dyeing tools, the same large sink and a drying space which is well divided. Iceland produces is known for its various dyestuffs, such as lychens of various colors, plants and flowers.

The Summer Festival is what I will be there for, and what I am most interested in. Summer Festival is where the artists of the residency, and surrounding area, make large scale (and small scale) outdoor installation works to celebrate the season, daylight and community. Expressing the passing of time, the changing of seasons, and the interaction between peoples through outdoor installation. I want to be part of this festival for the rest of my life, this is what I live for.

Here is a quote from the  2013 Summer Festival at the Textílsetúr Island Icelandic Textile Centre:

We are gleaners.

Our language relies on materiality;
Rusted industrial scraps, seaweed, wool, old sheets, jumpsuits;
Borrowed and re-interpreted milliner techniques.
We’re discovering points of reflection that hint towards metaphysical meaning.
Some say there is an inherent biological tendency for equilibrium.
One is to leave a skin of time, their pieces of vulnerability stripped by weathering and human treatments.

We are what we touch- smell, see, hear, taste.

There is a clarity, a peacefulness on the mountain, it effects your whole being. We become this mountain, this stillness, this landscape.
The elements vibrate through us, her wind rippling taut green strings on rusted forms.
A wave of modulation surfs until it breaks, and all you see is a framed landscape – the sun atop the ocean.

2013 Summer Festival

This is where I am meant to be.

Here is the link the website where you can find out more about the residency, and more about how to apply.

http://textilsetur.com/home-page/

-Natalie
 

As a few of you may already know, herpes
I will be spending June, July and August of 2014 on residency at the Icelandic Textile Centre in Blönduòs, Iceland. The residency is uniquely for textile artists, and I highly recommend all of you apply. Facilities include:

Weaving Rooms: They have looms of two differents sizes: 80 and 140cm. They are 4, 6 or 8 shafts Counter-balanced. Residents have full access to weaving equipment: large selection of reeds, warping reel, distaff holders, shuttles, yarn reels etc.

Dyeing Rooms: It is a full scale natural dyeing room.  Provided with a small movable oven, dyeing tools, the same large sink and a drying space which is well divided. Iceland produces is known for its various dyestuffs, such as lychens of various colors, plants and flowers.

The Summer Festival is what I will be there for, and what I am most interested in. Summer Festival is where the artists of the residency, and surrounding area, make large scale (and small scale) outdoor installation works to celebrate the season, daylight and community. Expressing the passing of time, the changing of seasons, and the interaction between peoples through outdoor installation. I want to be part of this festival for the rest of my life, this is what I live for.

Here is a quote from the  2013 Summer Festival at the Textílsetúr Island Icelandic Textile Centre:

We are gleaners.

Our language relies on materiality;
Rusted industrial scraps, seaweed, wool, old sheets, jumpsuits;
Borrowed and re-interpreted milliner techniques.
We’re discovering points of reflection that hint towards metaphysical meaning.
Some say there is an inherent biological tendency for equilibrium.
One is to leave a skin of time, their pieces of vulnerability stripped by weathering and human treatments.

We are what we touch- smell, see, hear, taste.

There is a clarity, a peacefulness on the mountain, it effects your whole being. We become this mountain, this stillness, this landscape.
The elements vibrate through us, her wind rippling taut green strings on rusted forms.
A wave of modulation surfs until it breaks, and all you see is a framed landscape – the sun atop the ocean.

2013 Summer Festival

This is where I am meant to be.

Here is the link the website where you can find out more about the residency, and more about how to apply.

http://textilsetur.com/home-page/

-Natalie
In a little over six weeks I will be travelling to Japan to install my first solo exhibition in Kyoto. Frequency runs at GalleryGallery from February 22 to March 8, nurse
2014. I will post more about the work in the exhibition soon but for now here is the promotional postcard designed by James Jensen of Atom Graphics. (Thank you sir.)

MackenzieFrere-GGE-invite-2014-01

MackenzieFrere-GGE-invite-2014-02

Upcoming Exhibition

I have an exhibition coming up called The Imagined Past at Stride’s Project Room! Join me at my opening on February 22nd at 8:00pm. There will be a talk on the Saturday in the afternoon as well. Excellent exhibition text by Kristofer Kelly. Hope to see you all there!

Heather Huston
www.hhuston.com

Air over land | installation part 1

Tomoko Arakawa is an artist who has inspired me not just with her art work, price but also her words. I wanted to share both with you all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toki no inori (Prayer for Time)

Stainless Steel, cystitis Pigment; Macrame and free technique

200 x 120 x 30 cm

2010

In Toki no inori (Prayer for Time) Tomoko has created a beautiful hand knotted and twisted basket out of stainless steel and pigment. As I am well-aware (thanks to my most recent warping experience), ed stainless steel is very difficult to work with, and I am amazed by the intricacy of the twisted little knots of the piece. The piece is small as it is, at 200 x 120 x 30 cm.

In the catalogue for the exhibit Fiber Futures, Japans Textile Pioneers, Arakawa explains her emotional catalyst for making the piece in an eloquently succinct artist statement:

In Prayer for Time, I made a piece whose design conjures up a sense of air and water, as a way of showing my gratitude to the relatives, friends and acquaintances I’ve shared my life with so far, and expressing my hope that my time with them can go on forever. Teh blue area in the center was inspired by the shape of a leaf or a lake: water as a source of life and a deep well of tolerance…”

I was blown away by the intensity of this statement, conveyed in but a few lines. I highly recommend checking out the catalogue, it is worth spending some time reading.

xoxo,

Katherine

 

DSC_0118

On Sunday, see Kris and I travelled to the site where Air over land is to be installed. With the help of my father Ed Frère we hung one of the pieces to test the attachment point (This will likely be refined somewhat once the other two are in place.) and to determine if the work would actually fly in the wind.

DSC_0130

DSC_0174

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DSC_0192

I was greatly assisted in the knitting of these pieces by artist Marci Simkulet. The knit “skeleton” of each piece is a thin madder-dyed linen. I then overlaid and felted a fine layer of merino wool into the red mesh of knitting to provide a membrane that would catch the wind and perhaps deteriorate over time in the weather. Jason Hussey created the fine steel frame to support each tube.

DSC_0198

In this last image you can see the massive dugout my father and his brother created to collect water for trees that he has planted on the property. It is a very deep cut into the earth in a crescent shape, information pills
its depth was necessary to reach clay that will actually hold water. Although not initially part of the project, I think this unintentional earthwork is a remarkable intervention in the landscape that relates to some of the ideas I am investigating with Air over land.

DSC_0212

It was an incredibly beautiful, and very cold day, but there was no wind. The morning after we installed the first piece I received a video from my mother Lorna Sarah…

The final two pieces will be installed after Christmas sometime.

-Mackenzie Frère

Folly: Château Mathieu

Fibre Faculty Laura Vickerson is one of six artists who have contributed to Folly: Château Mathieu at the Esplanade Art Gallery in Medicine Hat…

In the summer of 2009, pills Alberta artists M.N. Hutchinson, recipe Walter May, ambulance Gloria Mok, Greg Payce, Laura Vickerson and visual arts writer/curator Diana Sherlock received a curious invitation to develop a residency at Château Mathieu, a private residence built in the French Borough of Caen in Lower Normandy in the latter part of the 18th century. Constructed at the beginning of the French Enlightenment, Château Mathieu reflects an important shift from private worlds of wealth, wonder and mystery to the rise of rationalist thought and its subsequent organization into modern systems of knowledge and their distribution by public institutions. Housed within these walls are tales spanning the bloody terror of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic wars, the brazen Nazi occupation during WWII and the French Resistance’s alliance with the British, which led to the battle of Normandy and the end of the war. Château Mattieu’s lonely halls whisper more personal stories as well; ones of scientific, artistic and colonial discovery, silent espionage, and the struggle to maintain a home during war and economic collapse. From diverse individual perspectives, and without a predetermined outcome in mind, each of the six participants mined this rich history of the Château Mathieu to produce new works for Folly: Château Mathieu; tales of excess and ruin that continue to resonate within our contemporary context.

Folly: Château Mathieu is at the Esplanade Art Gallery in Medicine Hat August 25, 2012 to December 8, 2012. The opening reception will take place September 28 from 7 to 10 pm. All are welcome and the event is free!