Weaving and plant Dying for Luxury Home goods

We all know how difficult it is to produce work that is for sale, public health and keep it marketable and priced at a salable price. It is hard to balance production technique with hand finishing every little detail. I often find myself making work that is either so detail oriented and labour intensive that it is impossible to sell or work or work that I feel I have to make too many compromises on to sell at an appropriate price. Sometimes it is difficult to remember that there is a place for both kinds of work, it’s a matter of choosing, or balancing both.

It is always encouraging to find other artists that have found ways keep the processes and ethical material sourcing as the most integral part of the work. One of my favourite examples is a brand called Matson+Palmer. Christy Maston and Jane Palmer work as a pair in Los Angeles. Jane is a natural dyer and Christy a weaver. Together they create luxury hand-made blankets and pillows. They are able to incorporated hand work at every stage of production in their work which makes their work distinct and beautiful.

They are one of my favourite examples of contemporary makers/designers who are working at a luxury goods price point.

 

matson_palmer2
Matson, Christy and Jane Palmer. Blanket. 2016. Plant dyed and hand woven cashmere. Matson+Palmer. Web. 7 Oct. 2016.
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Matson, Christy and Jane Palmer. Pillows. 2016. Plant dyed and hand woven cashmere. Matson+Palmer. Web. 7 Oct. 2016.
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Matson, Christy and Jane Palmer. Pillows. 2016. Plant dyed and hand woven cashmere. Matson+Palmer. Web. 7 Oct. 2016.

For more info visit their site matsonpalmer

or instagram @matsonplamer

-Rael

Fibre can be conceptual. Here’s a book that reminds me of this truth.

As some of you may or may not know I really struggled with choosing a major.  I went back and forth mentally (and physically) between Sculpture and Fibre for over 2 years.  I loved the ruthless, impotent heady space of sculpture and felt it was a comfortable place for someone like me (someone with no particular skill set, cardiologist an aversion to paint and a tendency to think too much).

After a couple years of gearing myself towards a Sculpture major I took Mackenzie’s Weaving I class for some “material therapy”.  I just wanted to make something beautiful and useful.  I wanted to make something I didn’t have to explain to my Mom. I made a scarf and some pillows. I fell in love with weaving.

Porter, about it Jenelle, and Glenn Adamson. Fiber: Sculpture 1960-Present. New York: Prestel, 2014. Print.

I was completely torn between conceptual art making and the idea of functional craft.  It took me another year to realize I didn’t have to choose between the two and that fibre work could be just as conceptual as any other type of art.  Had I found a book like Jenelle Porter’s Fiber: Sculpture 1960 – Present earlier I might not have struggled so terribly with my decision to stay in Fibre.

I found this book quite by accident one day while browsing my life away on Amazon. I saw the title and added this 256 page beauty to my cart with little hesitation.  The inclusion of Eva Hesse as a fibre artist is what pushed me to the “checkout” button.

The first half of this book contains several essays and is absolutely busting with full color pictures from over 30 artists.  The second half includes a one page write up on each of the artists as well as more photographs of their work. Although I have yet to read through all of the artists essays I do enjoy looking through it with some regularity.  I find it a great source of inspiration!

Unfortunately, our library doesn’t own a copy of this book but if you see it sitting on my desk feel free to have a look at it.

kellie.

A Little Motivation

 

tgd04-leon_539c4da9-5d80-44ab-bf73-2875cc5ea5d9_grande

Source: “The Great Discontent Issue 4.” https://shop.thegreatdiscontent.com/products/the-great-discontent-issue-four. Web. Sept 5, glaucoma 2016.

This week I would like to share with you one of my favourite magazines… The Great Discontent.  

The Great Discontent (TGD) is a print and online magazine featuring inspiring, infertility in-depth conversations with today’s artists, health makers, and risk takers. TDG looks into the lives of its subjects through long-form interviews and short features, a podcast, a live event series and film-based projects. This magazine is published by Wayward Wild in New York City.

Print issues are available for purchase in TGD’s online shop and at retailers worldwide. In addition to print, they also publish new digital content on their website throughout the month. You can also purchase digital copies of all their magazines. I purchased their first magazine digitally a few years ago. Accessing the magazine on my computer and phone is a simple and enjoyable experience. I love googling the artists and viewing their websites while I read through the magazine.

Here’s a summary of what their printed issues cover:

Issue # 1

This issue features a collection of inspiring interviews loosely based around the theme of leaps. Their stories encourage, inspire, and challenge us to make the jump, even if—and especially when—we’re afraid.


Issue # 2

The theme of hustle implores us to reconsider the idea of making it—both how we do it and how we define it. This magazine is a reminder that more often than not, we must work hard to carve out a path to doing the work we love.

Issue # 3

Features those who have dared to push the boundaries of what is achievable.  Their stories will encourage you to explore your interests and overcome your fears, allowing you to discover what you’re truly capable of.

Issue # 4

Ambition is the theme of this issue, covering a selection of interviews with those who are committed to their crafts and pursuing their paths with a sense of purpose. Their stories will drive you to explore your ambitions and chase them with a renewed resolve.

Reading these interviews is a treat, and they help inform your practice at the same time. You can’t go wrong with TGD, it’s well worth your time. It is a great resource for any creative in any stage of their career.

I hope you enjoy reading TGD as much as I do.


-Caroline-

samantha-pleet-portrait-hannah-metz-hero

Source: “Samantha Pleet.” https://thegreatdiscontent.com/interview/samantha-pleet. Interview by Ryan and Tina Essmaker. Photograph by Hannah Kristina Metz. Web. March 24, 2015. 



We’ve lost Shuttleworks but not access to Maurice Brassard yarns

Last year I took a huge leap out of my comfort zone and enrolled in 3 ceramic courses at ACAD ceramic courses. At the time I was looking for a challenge, more about I left as if I had become too comfortable in my textile work and was no longer feeling a need to push and develop ideas. I was lucky enough to have Katrina Chaytor as my Introduction to Handbuilding instructor, and Robin Dupont as my Introduction to wheel throwing instructor. I remember my very first throwing class feeling as if I would never be able to move a 1 pound of clay into anything resembling a vessel, but still managed to accept the challenge it presented.

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Katrina Chaytor. Cups and Saucers. Hand-built Earthenware with slip, glazes and iron transfers. Web. 19 Oct 2016.
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Robin Dupont. Soda Fired Plates. 2012. Web. 19 Oct 2016.

What I learned in that semester was not only a multitude of skills and practices that I will carry throughout my life, but also the to practice care. To do the things you care about, to cherish new obstacles as an opportunity to grow as an artist and a person. I think what I learned the most is that the work I care about most is the work that doesn’t sit on a wall in a gallery, it is the work that I get to touch, use and cherish every day. Art can be enjoyed not only intellectually and visual but also physically. As I seek to develop more functional work for the use in the home exemplifying care has become an essential part of my practice.

Visit Katrina’s site here

And Robin’s here

-Rael
There are two things about weaving supplies I would like to share with you all right away:

  1. Shuttleworks is CLOSED!
    Cal and Diane will have a final “last chance” sale starting Thursday, prescription
    October 6.  Check out their newsletter for the details.
  2. A & B Fiberworks
    This summer I discovered A & B Fiberworks at the Calgary Crossroads Market. Ann and her husband are the new local distributor for Maurice Brassard yarns (these are the same cottons that both Shuttleworks and the bookstore carried). Their store space at the market is small but they have most of the 2/8 cotton colorway in stock.Ann has all of the sample cards from the Maurice Brassard collection (bamboo, more about
    boucle, cottolin, etc.) available for perusing and she told me she would be happy to order in anything that you may need.

    A & B Fiberworks have both a website and Facebook page.

kellie.

 

Getting Yourself Organized!

It’s that time of year again, drugs when students need to start planning their future while we tackle all the course work that’s coming our way. Career goals, viagra buy planning, website organization, writing, marketing, making awesome work, preparing portfolios… the list goes on. School becomes quite overwhelming pretty quickly. That’s why today I am dedicating my post to super sweet resources that can get anyone back on track from their summer vacation!

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Source: “Kreg looks like he’s starting to regret those 4 years.” Imgur. https://imgur.com/Fp9qol8.  Web, April 24, 2016.

FOR PERSONAL ORGANIZATION

EVERNOTE : A personal content manager. Keep lists of websites you like, recipes, ANYTHING that you want to keep track of. Accessible from anywhere, Shareable with other evernote users (good for group work).

Google Drive : Cloud Storage, integrated into gmail. Most useful for gmail users, but is accessible with any google account. Best for personal storage only, sharing capability isn’t great, doesn’t create links for file downloading purposes.

Google Calendar : Scheduling app. Works best integrated into gmail. Make different ‘calendars’ for different uses, easy to share calendars with others, send/make appointments automatically through email. This is my savior this year!

Toggl : Time tracker. Really great for knowing where your work day went, or how long you’ve spent on a job. Very simple, can generate time sheets too.

FOR GROUP WORK

Google Hangouts : Group video chat. Best video conference tool for more than 2 users at a time. Can share your screen with other callers, and text links during calls. Needs gmail account.

Skype : Two person video chat. Commonly used worldwide, has recording capability with plugin software such as, CallRecorder

DropBox : Cloud Storage, made very useful for projects and file sharing. Free account with free space that grows with recommendations. Excellent for file sharing and making downloadable files. Integrated onto your desktop. (Good for group work)

GoToMeeting : Paid group chat provider. More reliable for important, professional meetings.

FOR BUSINESS

Mailchimp : Free (up to 1000 contacts) contact list manager and email creation software. Keep your mailing list up to date and in order. Track who opens emails, categorize contacts, generates a ‘sign up’ form you can embed on your website. Starting a mailing list is great for when you start to build clientele at craft shows.

The Square (POS) : Extremely easy point of sale device. Connects to your bank account, allows small vendors to accept credit cards. Low % commission on per sale basis. No contract. Vital for craft shows!

Dreamhost : Web­hosting. Affordable and easy to manage, good user interface, great customer service and friendly. Can register all kinds of domains too.

Big Cartel : E­commerce platform, great for small shops.  – up to 3 item shops are hosted Free. Uses paypal. – Can be cloaked on your personal website.

Shopify : Canadian E­commerce platform, good plans available for larger shops with many items or lots of sales. – Can be cloaked on your personal website.

Wave : Canadian online Accounting software. Free for small business, can connect to your bank account. Does invoicing, tracks expenses and bill payments.

Quickbooks Online : Highly tested and true accounting software. Online tool is new, I have heard only good things about this platform. Makes sending invoices easy and professionally to your clients.

Tangerine : Online banking, personal or business. No fee banking, great user interface, interest on savings, picture check deposits, easily shared/linked accounts – I hesitate to recommend a bank, but this one deserves a look.

FOR PUBLISHING

Issuu : Web publishing into digital flipbooks. Free. Used by magazines for professional online published look. Upload a PDF and the site crunches it into a online flipbook with a link.

Blurb : Affordable, high quality, hardcopy book publishing. Can order 1 or more books – best to be designed in InDesign, but can be published from a PDF. Site will generate a flipbook of you book with link – printing proof. Delivery in a few weeks.

Graph Paper Press : Wordpress themes for creatives, free and paid. Great quality and design, come with updates, lots of functionality.

Moo Cards : Very high quality printing. Offers low unit print runs, can be expensive but you don’t end up with 1000s of cards (which is often a waste). Lots of customization.

Vista Print :  Affordable large run printing. Canadian (lower shipping cost). Mid range quality. Limited customization.

Overnight Prints.com : Good quality printing, fast turnaround. Shipping from California, can be pricey. Moderate customization.

Adfactor : Toronto printing company. Can order online or in person. Turnaround time is a couple weeks, can be convenient. Limited customization, average prices. FOR SOCIAL NETWORKING

FOR SOCIAL NETWORKS 

Etsy : Sales platform. Connected directly to customers. Is known for craft, batch production, hand made goods by real people. Very quick to sign up and begin sales pursuit.

Linked in : Business driven social media. Linked In profiles are very often used as resumes and in job acquisition. Ability to ‘endorse’ contacts for their skill set. Good for finding references.

Hootsuite : Social Networking Manager. Put in time all at once and Hootsuite posts and updates your social platforms for you – as per your programmed schedule. Great for keeping networking sites

I love getting organized and staying on top of things! If you have a useful site, platform or source that you’d like to share, comment below! We’re all in this together. Lets make this year a great one!

painting-pupper
Source: “We don’t make mistakes, just happy little accidents.” Imgur. https://imgur.com/su9hjm4.  Web, August 29, 2016.

-Caroline-

Up Next

With my degree coming to a close, stomatology I have been thinking a lot about what direction my practice will take. I have some time to relax before pursuing a career in architecture and I want to ensure I continue making. There are many intersections between art and architecture and I intend to explore them. As a reaction I have created a list of large-scale projects that will keep my mind busy and ambitions high, with the goal that somewhere in the next ten years I’ll make it there.

With that said, here is a piece on my list of inspirations: Triangular Water Pavilion by Jeppe Hein.

This piece is created using two walls of two-way mirrors and a wall of water, creating a triangle. The piece is elevated above a basin of water. Hein describes the effect of the work on his website, where it states, “approaching visitors prompt the descent of the water wall through the activation of a sensor, gaining access to the enclosed space. Upon entry, visitors find themselves surrounded by water and reflective glass, cut off from the exterior by the resurgence of the water jets.”

Now, why didn’t I think of that?

 

-Marcia

Check out Jeppe’s website (also my image source) here: http://www.jeppehein.net/index.php

Smocking

Smocking is a technique where fabric is pleated and then adorned with embroidery stitches. Smocking was a popular technique used before elastic was invented to create stretch within the fabric. Normally smocking is applied to necklines, viagra cuffs and bodices of a garment.

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 12.02.12 PM

I am planning on using this technique in my next piece. I have been using different techniques to manipulate garments and I like the way smocking creates texture within the material. It reminds me of the way skin stretches and wrinkles.

Here are a few images I’ve found in my research…

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I’ve never tried smocking before but I’ve found a bunch of tutorials online…

Wish me luck 🙂

Carly

Natural Dye Workshop

Hey everyone! I will be teaching a two day natural dye workshop at ACAD. The workshop takes place during the last week of April. Check it out on pg 12!  on the Extended Studies course calendar.

-Caroline

IMG_2409

Back to Basics

In a reaction to the loss of a loved one, this web I decided to switch gears within my practice and focus on creating a work that allowed myself to work through the grief. This work took shape in the form of two weavings which are roughly 2′ x 6′. The weaving process is repetitive and therefore conducive to reflection. I feel this direction provided an outlet for my grieving process, hospital while also providing new insights for my practice.

Weaving, In Progress
Weaving, In Progress

After reflecting on the process, I see that this was an important step towards facing what I did not want to; in the weeks between losing my grandmother and beginning the weaving process, I inadvertently kept myself busy with activities which would not bring up thoughts of the loss. Starting and following through with the weaving put a personal pressure on dealing with every aspect of my loss.

Weaving, In Progress
Weaving, In Progress

The scale of these woven pieces is meant to reflect a figure. I chose to keep everything concerning the weaving minimal, including the weaving structure and colour palette. I did not want any distraction from the conceptual meaning of the pieces. I chose to weave openly so there would be a high level of transparency in the cloth. These pieces stand for what is gone, but not lost. It is an attempt to put to materiality what cannot be seen or touched, but is certainly present. It is an ode to the elusive, deep understanding that the loss of a loved one is only a physical loss.

-Marcia
In my final year at ACAD, sick
I decided to take my elective studio courses in departments I had not previously expanded to. This year is largely my last constraint-free opportunity to make full-time, prosthetic
and I am working to enjoy every part of it. This semester, order I am taking a wheel-throwing class. This has proven very difficult; there is a huge amount of technique in throwing and subsequently a high level of frustration. Having just passed midterms, I am now feeling confident and comfortable on the wheel. It has been rewarding and soothing, and something that I will definitely pursue outside of school.

More than anything, this class has reminded me to not take myself too seriously this semester. Although my practice has remained quite serious throughout the year, I am still looking to soak up every free moment of making. My cups, bowls, and pitchers have been a very light-hearted experience and in turn compliment the thoughtful exploration taking place in my textile practice. I feel this is bringing a balance to my practice that I have learned from, and will take with me beyond my graduation from ACAD.

 

-Marcia

“The Only Way Around Is Through”

In a reaction to the loss of a loved one, healthful I decided to switch gears within my practice and focus on creating a work that allowed myself to work through the grief. This work took shape in the form of two weavings which are roughly 2′ x 6′. The weaving process is repetitive and therefore conducive to reflection. I feel this direction provided an outlet for my grieving process, while also providing new insights for my practice.

Weaving, In Progress
Weaving, In Progress

After reflecting on the process, I see that this was an important step towards facing what I did not want to; in the weeks between losing my grandmother and beginning the weaving process, I inadvertently kept myself busy with activities which would not bring up thoughts of the loss. Starting and following through with the weaving put a personal pressure on dealing with every aspect of my loss.

Weaving, In Progress
Weaving, In Progress

The scale of these woven pieces is meant to reflect a figure. I chose to keep everything concerning the weaving minimal, including the weaving structure and colour palette. I did not want any distraction from the conceptual meaning of the pieces. I chose to weave openly so there would be a high level of transparency in the cloth. These pieces stand for what is gone, but not lost. It is an attempt to put to materiality what cannot be seen or touched, but is certainly present. It is an ode to the elusive, deep understanding that the loss of a loved one is only a physical loss.

-Marcia

Kimono Painting

Congratulations to Jane Kidd, view this year’s recipient of the Saidye Bronfman award!

unnamed

The Governor General’s Awards in Visual and Media Arts were created in 1999 by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Governor General of Canada. Over the past 16 years, online the awards have celebrated Canada’s vibrant arts community and recognized remarkable careers in the visual and media arts.

In 2007, cough the Saidye Bronfman Award for excellence in the fine crafts (originally created in 1977) joined this prestigious family of awards. This ensures that Canada’s outstanding craft artists receive national recognition each year alongside their peers in the visual and media arts. The Canada Council has been administering the Saidye Bronfman Award since 1997.

Through the act of weaving, Jane Kidd, engages in a sensual process and employs a physical language to establish links with the viewer. Kidd appreciates that she is a participant in the continuum of its makers, the counterpoint it provides to modern life, and the hands-on materiality it embodies. She creates contemporary objects that convey a deep engagement with the natural world and draw our attention to our constantly renegotiated relationship with it.

Jane taught at the Alberta College of Art + Design in Calgary, Alberta from 1979 until 2010.
I came across this mesmerizing video while looking up kimono designs. The video illustrates the design process, eczema
transferring of the pattern onto silk, rice paste resists, background painting, rinsing, steaming, detailed foreground painting, and the addition of gold leaf with stencils and gold embroidery. The results are absolutely stunning and so is the amount of skill, work and time that goes into one piece.

Role Reversal

I got my tax return and was able to go to Value Village to pick up some stuff. I ran into a friend at the store and we thrifted together. I found enough black fabric for my tent, generic so I have everything I need to make my tent now, this site I just have to sit down and do it. I bought my 7 white shirts that I need to dye with rust. Can anyone tell me if the soy bean is necessary when you dye with rust? Can I just use water and rusty objects or does the soy do something special? Thats all I got from Value Village for school and I need to go back. I am thinking of going back this Sunday, luckily the lady gave me a 30% off coupon for my next visit. I still need to figure out a couple bottoms for people. I still need big feathers and grommets but my boss said she will stop at Michaels to get those for me. Life seemed to have turned around financially, but last night I found a whole new problem. I think one of my heating pipes is leaking because pools of water keep showing up on my floor. I need to deal with this ASAP, this morning, before it gets any worse. I really need to move out of the Ghetto. I feel like I have never lived somewhere and not had problems, maybe that is just life, or maybe that is just Calgary. Back home, the rent is like cut in half nearly, and its not so aggravating when things in your house break because, well, you’re only paying like 600 bucks.

I did, however, book a photoshoot day. Wednesday March 30th. It was the only day that worked for everyone. This means I need to have absolutely everything finished by this day. I have a lot of work ahead of me.

 

  • Chelsey Wensveen

This semester I am taking a painting class called Research and Process. For the second project I had researched British artist Lydia Gifford and applied three of her themes to my piece. This included monochromatic materials, information pills
layering and challenging traditional painting methods in combination with sculptural aspects. Here I was able to reverse my artistic practice, melanoma
which usually consists of deconstructing painting through colour with textiles. Instead, condom
for this painting project I have used white paint in place of my conventional colour blocks.

My piece titled, Gesso on Canvas, is made up of sixty layers of torn canvas. I found the combination of frayed fabric with dried gesso to compliment my regular work, especially with the lack of colour. I would consider this piece both finished and unfinished and will always consider it so no matter the additions or reductions.

It is interesting to see myself end up at nearly identical end points, even starting with a completely different research process. Here is my work:

gesso gesso1

-Emily

 

Fibre Arts Book Sale!

Over reading break in my hometown I decided to try and teach people how to knit.

I hosted a Wool and the Gang knitting party where they set up the event and sell the wool but I teach the class.

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It was very successful 13 people signed up and everyone finished there Snood Operator which was the name of the project.

 

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The knitting projects are super fun and for all levels of knitting and the best part is that you get your project for half the price and the host gets one for free!

Knit Parties

 

-Nicole
Luke Lindoe Library’s

Fibre Arts Book Sale

book_nerd1

February 25-27th

In conjunction with

‘Fibre Fortnight’ (https://acad.ca/fibre-fortnight-2016)

and

‘925: A Sterling Anniversary’ (https://acad.ca/925-A-Sterling-Anniversary)

Featuring the generous donation from the estate of SANDRA KRYSTALOWICH, health
award-winning Calgary quilter, physician
this sale will include

a treasure-trove of New and ‘As New’ books on all forms of Quilting, Embroidery and all aspects of the needle arts.

Thursday February 25th

ACAD Main Mall 12-5:30pm

Friday February 26th

Library 8:30am – 4:30pm

Saturday February 27th

Library 11am-5pm

CASH ONLY please (ATMs on campus)