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ACAD Alum Brandy Wilson | Breath of the Land

 Breath of the Land - Poster 2 - Brandy Wilson 2014

A little background on Brandy Wilson’s upcoming show in Fort Smith.

So there we all were – cruising on the Blue Loo (named after the fact that the blue barge has an outhouse at the back)…it was cold, thumb windy and wet..but I could not have been happier. Every now and then I would feel a warm patch and I mentioned this to one of the other guests…he laughed it off…as in “yeah right!”…I then mentioned it to Page Burt, our guide and resident botanist, she told me they call it the breath of the land.

Bathurst Inlet is an isolated community in the high arctic of Nunavut – population 75 in the summer. Read more about Wilson’s show HERE

IMG_4220 8x10

FREE tickets for YOSHIKO IWAMOTO WADA Lecture

 Breath of the Land - Poster 2 - Brandy Wilson 2014

A little background on Brandy Wilson’s upcoming show in Fort Smith.

So there we all were – cruising on the Blue Loo (named after the fact that the blue barge has an outhouse at the back)…it was cold, thumb windy and wet..but I could not have been happier. Every now and then I would feel a warm patch and I mentioned this to one of the other guests…he laughed it off…as in “yeah right!”…I then mentioned it to Page Burt, our guide and resident botanist, she told me they call it the breath of the land.

Bathurst Inlet is an isolated community in the high arctic of Nunavut – population 75 in the summer. Read more about Wilson’s show HERE

IMG_4220 8x10

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YOSHIKO IWAMOTO WADA is an artist, implant
author, viagra
curator, textile researcher and has long been an exponent of traditional and sustainable practices in fashion and textile production. She holds a BFA in Textile Art from Kyoto City Fine Arts University, MFA in Painting from University of Colorado, Boulder, and has studied Japanese silk embroidery, ikat weaving and indigo dyeing. She consults to designers including; Christina Kim of DOSA Inc., Los Angeles and Colleen Atwood for the movie ‘Memoirs of a Geisha’

The lecture will explore the complex strands and diverse approaches being taken by contemporary Japanese designers. With a focus on textiles and clothing, the selected case studies will highlight the extraordinary and innovative designs which seamlessly merge the boundaries between art and design; traditions and focus on textiles and clothing, the selected case studies will highlight their extraordinary and innovative designs which seamlessly merge the boundaries between art and design; traditional and technology; and makers and market.

Case studies include:  Issey Miyake, Tokyo; Jurgen Lehl of Tokyo; sou sou in Kyoto, Christina Kim of dosa inc in L.A., Organic Cotton/ Appachi in India; Arimatsu/Narumi shibori center and Suzuan e.K. in Germany.

Lecture:
Tuesday August 26, 2014.
7:00pm-9:30pm
Standford Perrot Theatre.

We have tickets to give away to the first 19 Fibre majors or Fibre Alumni that email, jolie.bird@acad.ca. Tickets will be available to pick up at the door prior to the lecture. To purchase tickets, please follow this link

ACAD Fibre Fortnight, Mini Silent Auction + Underwater Basket Weaving!

 

ACAD’s Fibre Program and the School of Craft + Emerging Media are pleased to present a series of events between March 11 and 20, sildenafil 2014 celebrating the talents of current students, phimosis alumni and faculty.

Fibre Fortnight Exhibition
This exhibition takes over the entire ACAD Main Mall and features student work at all levels across a variety of media including mixed media sculpture, surface design, weaving, video and more.

Miniature Silent Auction
Our yearly Fibre program fundraiser features small, collectible pieces donated by ACAD students, alumni, faculty and staff. Bidding is ongoing and will close March 20 at 6 pm. Funds raised support Fibre’s visiting artist program, student initiated projects and the Fibre graduating class. So bid early and bid often. 

Closing Reception + Alumni Panel
Finally, please join us from 5 to 9 pm for the Closing Reception for both exhibitions in the ACAD main mall (3rd floor); and a special alumni panel discussion hosted by the School of Craft + Emerging Media. Underwater Basket Weaving: Risk, Entrepreneurship and Strategies for Success will engage six ACAD alumni in conversation around their successes and overall experiences as entrepreneurs in a range of creative industries. Confirmed alumni panelists are:

Mackenzie Kelly-Frère, Associate Chair, School of Craft + Emerging Media (and ACAD Fibre alumnus) will facilitate the discussion. The panel starts at 7 pm in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre.

All are welcome and this event is open to the public.  We look forward to seeing you there!

2014 Miniature Show Silent Auction + Exhibition

Bronwyn Schuster is a young Canadian artist whose work spans several mediums. She primarily paints, troche and within the past year has been involved with an artist residency in Quebec, dentist and is attending The Swedish Academy of Realist Art. Her works touches upon several subjects, including self portraiture, and work that can be described as fantastical. She has created jewelry, art dolls, paintings large and small, commercial work, and is an avid member of several art scenes.

The Scarf- Self Portrait (Bronwyn Schuster, 2013)

(Question) How would you describe yourself as an artist?

(Answer) First question and you’ve already stumped me. I figure a lot of the artist I am is still trapped inside of me, as I lack some of the skills to express what it is that I imagine. I also don’t really know where me begins and artist ends. Mostly though, I am a tea drinking, generally happy, slightly ethereal, wannabe realist painter who uses surrealism far to much as a crutch when things go wrong.

The Swedish Academy of Realist Art                           Photo credit: Bronwyn Schuster

What is the school you are attending, and why did you choose to go there?

The Swedish Academy of Realist (aka SARA {aka Atelier Stockholm}) is a magical school that will pull at the heartstrings of any golden age nostalgist. SARA is built on the tradition of European fine arts ateliers where master painters would take on apprentices, teaching them techniques through a rigid academic approach to figure drawing and painting. Quite simply, we spend the days hunched over Charles Bargue lithographs, copying line for line and shade for shade is precise detail. This is broken up in the day with live model drawing, anatomy and materials lectures. After graduating from lithographs you move onto copying casts, then onto oil painting and still lifes. It’s a three year course, and 8 hour days. Possibly the most intensive immersion into fine arts you could find. Which is precisely why I chose to attend. There is something still striking and haunting about the oil paintings of old. They were true masters of their technique, and it’s not something you can learn at just any school. At SARA I know I am learning in relatively the same fashion that the masters did themselves, and I can even trace the lineage of my teachers (it goes back to Leonardo da Vinci!) I am a pure romanticist too. I really couldn’t imagine attending any other kind of school.

Inspired- Egon Schiele (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

What inspires or influences your different styles? For example, what inspired your Animal Magnetism series, and your self portrait series?

My inspirations are in a constant flux and change. At the moment I have noticed a strong influence from my fellow classmates, and at the same time the Swedish style of living. But, I find it difficult to explain my inspiration because I am such a visual person. You’ll just have to come over for tea so that I can show you. I can, however, explain how my self portrait series came about. One fine winter morning, out in the prairies of Saskatchewan, I found myself very frustrated with my particular art skill level and inability to paint portraits. This was the time before I had means to attend SARA, so I took it upon myself to research up artists I admired, delve into their life story and then try to replicate their style. I figured trying to mimic their techniques would teach me something, and choosing to paint myself gave me both 24/7 access to a live model (who I did not have to impress) and it insured that I wasn’t directly copying a painters art work. Thus my “Inspired By” self portrait series was born. I may have also had some influence by my photographer friend Susan Knight who had started a similar project in digital media. The animal people though? I can’t explain that. I have no clue where that came from …

Red Riding Hood (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Have you ever experienced artists’ block? What do you do to counter it?

Ah, artists block. I know you well. Artist block comes in many forms for me. There is technical artist block for starters. It’s when I’ve got the ideas, the subject, the materials and everything in front of me, and then I start working and EVERYTHING feels wrong. No matter what I do, I can’t replicate what I see in front of me or in my mind. It might be the most frustrating form of artists block for me. Usually it happens right on a huge learning curve, and you just have to power through it. But sometimes it’s good to take a break. Make something nice to drink and try again later. Generally I have to remember that it is not as bad as I think it is. Creative artists block usually happens due to lack of sleep. That’s when I rest and let the pressure go. If it lasts more than two days, then I’m just being lazy. Creativity is a muscle. You have to exercise it. Try new things. Write. Research, and have interesting conversations with people. Last of all artists blocks is procrastination. This one is sneaky. It comes in the form of “But I need to do this first!” Be that: make food, finish a chapter of a book, check facebook, do your taxes, organize something, go to the store, research something, watch a youtube video (who are you trying to kid). These are not important (okay, maaaybe food and taxes are) always put aside time for art and always use that time for art. As my friend Vincent always likes to say “What do we say to the god of unproductivity? … Not today!”

Artist block is not a valid excuse. Go make some art!

Inspired- Leonor Fini (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Bronwyn’s artwork et al can be found here: http://bronwynschuster.com/

 

-Emmelia Taylor

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, pharm
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 

The Reparative Impulse

 

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, tadalafil
but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

I found this and had to share it – especially for anyone else who is going through the “fourth year-final semester” angst. This kinda just says it all for me – and is a bit apropos for the readings that we are doing in Fibre 451, pilule
Grad class.

Hemorrhoids
Sept. 23, 2013″ src=”http://fibre.acadnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Sartre-Recipes-New-Yorker-470×422.jpeg” width=”470″ height=”422″ /> New Yorker Magazine, Sept. 23, 2013

 

Pick a pencil. Any pencil. Are you sure that is the right one? Maybe a pen.Or a brush. Grab some paper. What colour paper? Maybe you want a canvas. Or try organza. What colour warp? But are you sure you want to weave this? Take another look. What about mixed media for that. How do you know? etc.

lol. Christine

 

 

 

 
2014 MiniatureHello ACAD Community, read more

The annual Miniature Show Silent Auction and Exhibition is calling for submissions!

The Miniature Show will be exhibited as part of Fibre Fortnight March 10th-21st, cheap in the Main Mall. The silent auction will run until Thursday the 20th, physician
final bids at 6:30pm. All proceeds from the auction will be donated to Fibre Department for funding visiting artists and student enrichment.

Submitted artworks must be of 12”x12″x12″ or smaller, of any medium and subject matter. Artworks are accepted from all departments, students, faculty and alumni.

To submit work please email the title, medium, size, artist name, and a short description of any details by February 28th. All artwork can be delivered to the Fibre Department March 10th -14th.

Please email submissions to Natalie Lauchlan at natalie.lauchlan@acad.ca

Cheers,

The Fibre Department

Rock on… Girl Gang Dance Party!

(skip to 6:53 to see the artist’s hands or click HERE)

Remember when you use to draw or make things when you were little, site then drop whatever you were doing as soon as you realized someone was watching you? Did you ever feel like while you were in your own space creating your own little world for the pleasure of yourself, then suddenly your were maybe violated? I use to feel that why doing most things on my own or with a friend or my sister, it breaks your zone having a audience but now I totally get why people get so fascinated by what we do as artists and craftsmen/women. Having taken glass or wheel throwing for an example I will happily admit I could watch someone else make stuff for hours!

I get the same pleasure watching as I do making, especially as I’ve come to accept I cant get material to do exactly what I want it to anyhow (Ive even begun to grow fond of my unintended experiments).  Our hand and eye ordination is just as interesting as our personal vices that we bring to our work.  Maybe this is just me admitting to myself this is just another case of me being unable to divide my attention between two or three things like watching TV or reading a book while making myself lunch (to be clear its not like I cant make grill cheese perfectly but I seem to continue to challenge myself to make it half attentively.)

So I hope I wont bore you into watching just a minute even of this Bert Haanstra video, but really watch the hands of  people making in it. Its like a dance that goes both unnoticed and unappreciated! Or you can just enjoy the jazz in your background.

Zo~

Cayce Zavaglia is a contemporary artist using embroidery techniques to create obsessively detailed portraits.  Her portraits are done with wool on lined canvas, hospital
traditional material for embroidery but considers herself to be a painter because the way that she layers colours and lines mimics the way she would layer colour and line if she were painting with a brush.

I am not usually one to be attracted to portrait work however Zavaglias portrait work stands out to me.  Painting is often a very forgiving medium to work with, buy it is easy to mix colours off of the canvas until the desired colour is produced or to mix and blend on the canvas until the desired result is achieved.  Achieving specific shades and tones of colour by layering threads takes time and practice and cannot easily be undone if the result was undesirable.  The process Zavaglia uses to create portraits makes the work interesting conceptually. In observing one of these portraits up close the labour is apparent, clinic large detailed portraits built up with layers and layers of short threads stitched together to create the illusion of depth and textures that suggest an intimate layered connection to the person in the portrait.

Greg and I- Hand Embroidery: One-Ply Cotton, Silk, and Wool on Raw Belgian Linen, 9 x 18 inches

– Karin
Hello Fibre Grads, Myocarditis
I have added writing resource links to the Grad Paper Resource Page including the Perdue OWL (Online Writing Lab). Feel like taking a break from writing your Grad Paper Outline? Have a look at this!

At the risk of assisting you to procrastinate, resuscitator
Ubu Web is amazing! (And just might count as “research”!)

-Mackenzie

Completed straight jacket, pills
before embroidery.

My current work revolves around the idea of creating garments that relate to individuals or moments in time. Garment portraits, so to speak. Through this work, I explore the relation between textiles and the human body, and connection between clothing and the individual. This exploration is combined with an interest in history (particularly histories pertaining to medical, mortuary, and the bizarre).

To date, I have created numerous garments that relate to individuals, or groups of. The majority of the garments have focused on “freaks”. To be clear, the celebrity and influence of the individuals in the American Sideshow. I used these garments as a way of focusing my admiration of these individuals, while also hearkening to the imagined anxieties, and concerns.  My work still refers to the sideshow, but the more I research, the more I am interested in specific moments in time, as well as how it relates to the individuals involved.

This current garment, I have drawn upon the history of psychiatric institutions, using the straight jacket as a vessel. The straight jacket was constructed, after drafting a very basic pattern. I hoped to emulate the appearance of a mid-20th century straight jacket. Now, I have gotten to the point that I have begun the embellishment.

The straight jacket is going to be covered in embroidery, inscribed with the words graffiti-ed on the walls of abandoned asylums. The idea of actual insanity versus imagined insanity fascinates me, as well as the idea that it is difficult to distinguish the two.

Work in progress; the embroidery detail on the straight jacket.

-Emmelia Taylor

Completed straight jacket, sanitary
before embroidery.

My current work revolves around the idea of creating garments that relate to individuals or moments in time. Garment portraits, site
so to speak. Through this work, I explore the relation between textiles and the human body, and connection between clothing and the individual. This exploration is combined with an interest in history (particularly histories pertaining to medical, mortuary, and the bizarre).

To date, I have created numerous garments that relate to individuals, or groups of. The majority of the garments have focused on “freaks”. To be clear, the celebrity and influence of the individuals in the American Sideshow. I used these garments as a way of focusing my admiration of these individuals, while also hearkening to the imagined anxieties, and concerns.  My work still refers to the sideshow, but the more I research, the more I am interested in specific moments in time, as well as how it relates to the individuals involved.

This current garment, I have drawn upon the history of psychiatric institutions, using the straight jacket as a vessel. The straight jacket was constructed, after drafting a very basic pattern. I hoped to emulate the appearance of a mid-20th century straight jacket. Now, I have gotten to the point that I have begun the embellishment.

The straight jacket is going to be covered in embroidery, inscribed with the words graffiti-ed on the walls of abandoned asylums. The idea of actual insanity versus imagined insanity fascinates me, as well as the idea that it is difficult to distinguish the two.

Work in progress; the embroidery detail on the straight jacket.

-Emmelia Taylor

Completed straight jacket, buy before embroidery.

My current work revolves around the idea of creating garments that relate to individuals or moments in time. Garment portraits, seek so to speak. Through this work, noun
I explore the relation between textiles and the human body, and connection between clothing and the individual. This exploration is combined with an interest in history (particularly histories pertaining to medical, mortuary, and the bizarre).

To date, I have created numerous garments that relate to individuals, or groups of. The majority of the garments have focused on “freaks”. To be clear, the celebrity and influence of the individuals in the American Sideshow. I used these garments as a way of focusing my admiration of these individuals, while also hearkening to the imagined anxieties, and concerns.  My work still refers to the sideshow, but the more I research, the more I am interested in specific moments in time, as well as how it relates to the individuals involved.

This current garment, I have drawn upon the history of psychiatric institutions, using the straight jacket as a vessel. The straight jacket was constructed, after drafting a very basic pattern. I hoped to emulate the appearance of a mid-20th century straight jacket. Now, I have gotten to the point that I have begun the embellishment.

The straight jacket is going to be covered in embroidery, inscribed with the words graffiti-ed on the walls of abandoned asylums. The idea of actual insanity versus imagined insanity fascinates me, as well as the idea that it is difficult to distinguish the two.

Work in progress; the embroidery detail on the straight jacket.

-Emmelia Taylor

Completed straight jacket, hospital before embroidery.

My current work revolves around the idea of creating garments that relate to individuals or moments in time. Garment portraits, so to speak. Through this work, I explore the relation between textiles and the human body, and connection between clothing and the individual. This exploration is combined with an interest in history (particularly histories pertaining to medical, mortuary, and the bizarre).

To date, I have created numerous garments that relate to individuals, or groups of. The majority of the garments have focused on “freaks”. To be clear, the celebrity and influence of the individuals in the American Sideshow. I used these garments as a way of focusing my admiration of these individuals, while also hearkening to the imagined anxieties, and concerns.  My work still refers to the sideshow, but the more I research, the more I am interested in specific moments in time, as well as how it relates to the individuals involved.

This current garment, I have drawn upon the history of psychiatric institutions, using the straight jacket as a vessel. The straight jacket was constructed, after drafting a very basic pattern. I hoped to emulate the appearance of a mid-20th century straight jacket. Now, I have gotten to the point that I have begun the embellishment.

The straight jacket is going to be covered in embroidery, inscribed with the words graffiti-ed on the walls of abandoned asylums. The idea of actual insanity versus imagined insanity fascinates me, as well as the idea that it is difficult to distinguish the two.

Work in progress; the embroidery detail on the straight jacket.

-Emmelia Taylor
Steven Cottingham has written a piece on Melinda Topilko, tooth
Peter Britton, health
and Lindsay Joy’s Girl Gang Dance Party…

Each stall provides a visitor with a different form of unloading or banishing, different ways to take control. Emotional burdens and desperate secrets can be pinned down, captured in the shackles of language, written on slips of paper and released into a glowing toilet bowl. Another stall has been converted into a photo booth, wherein the unsure and the shy (and possibly the distressed, the wounded, the mascara-streaked refugees) can photograph themselves on disposable cameras. The film cameras are an important touch, here. The time it takes to develop the resulting photographs means we are not granted an instantaneous image to judge. Superficial self-deprecation is precluded. We cannot critique the frozen absurdity of our own face as soon as the shutter closes, as we can when enacting selfies on our iPhones or webcams. We will be equally imperfect when the developed images are posted online. We will be equally beautiful in our naturality.

Read the whole post HERE…

-Mackenzie

Exhibit Review Published in the “Wildlands Advocate”

Elisa

Red Deer River, more about Near Schraeder Creek Natural Area | Elisa Sereno-Janz

Late last term Dana Bush ( 2103 Fibre Grad), surgery Elisa Sereno- Janz ( 2014 Grad – Drawing) and Amanda Oberacher ( ACAD Alumni, for sale Painting) had a group show at the Alberta Wilderness Offices in NW Calgary, called A Shifting Balance. Dana asked me to write a review/essay about their show, and it was published, with images of the artists’ work, this week. The publication is called the Wildlands Advocate, and the article is called “Three Artists Who Give Voice to the Silent

As is often the case when you give your work over to editors under time crunches,  they did a weird punctuation error in the last paragraph. For the most part though, the editors did publish the whole review, which is rare and gratifying.  Editing can sometimes take the heart out of a piece, and they gave it full coverage. I thank the publication for that!

I think that really engaging with,  thinking about, and writing on other artists’ practices can give us clues into our own systems of working and enlarge our perspective. This has been just one of the invaluable lessons and encouragements that I have received here at ACAD, and I plan to continue with writing as part of my practice.

 

– Christine Thomson

 

 

Melinda Topilko + Lindsay Joy – Bathroom Dance Party

Melinda and Lindsay’s project is part of Phantom Wing at the King Edward School.

Congratulations Sabrina Niebler

Recent grad and Board of Governors’s Graduating Student award winner Sabrina Niebler has won the American Tapestry Alliance International Student Award.

Congratulations Sabrina!

Pauline Macura Brown | Wounds, Scars, Recovery

My work is informed by an exploration of my own identity as a first generation Canadian of Polish ancestry, pill an ancestry that has been overshadowed by my father’s WWII experience. As with many war veterans’ offspring: the second generation of post- memory, resuscitator my history is one of silence. Using laborious production techniques (such as knitting, order sewing and embroidery) combined with conventional drawing and painting, I interrupt the silence of the past to make audible the hidden, forgotten and overlooked histories that haunt and continue to haunt even in generations that did not experience the trauma of war.

Pauline Macura Brown’s exhibition at the Marion Nicol Gallery opens this Thursday at 5 pm. See you there.

Extended Studies Fibre Courses

THE MUMMERS PARTY combines theatrical staging with sculptural knitted installation in an invested exploration of cultural identity, women’s health folklore and craft practice. Referring to the traditional folk practice of mumming, bronchitis a lively and often drunken affair made popular in Newfoundland & Labrador, the figures of THE MUMMERS PARTY are not rowdy, they are haunted. Pulling inspiration from David Blackwood’s iconic The Mummer’s Veil print works, this exhibition explores the tension between comfort and oddity, humour and unease – a sentiment commonly felt by those who have witnessed or experienced mumming first hand.

Suzen Green’s exhibition The Mummers Party opens tomorrow night at 8 pm at Stride Gallery in Calgary Alberta. The exhibition runs until October 5, 2012.

ACAD Fibre Alumnus Suzen Green is teaching two exciting courses, Migraine
Rug Hooking Basics and Knitting in the Studio  for ACAD Extended Studies. More information HERE

For a full calendar of courses offered this Fall+Winter 2012/13, click here. You can register for courses offered through Extended Studies by checking out their website or calling 403-284-7640.

Suzen Green | The Mummers Party

THE MUMMERS PARTY combines theatrical staging with sculptural knitted installation in an invested exploration of cultural identity, more about folklore and craft practice. Referring to the traditional folk practice of mumming, a lively and often drunken affair made popular in Newfoundland & Labrador, the figures of THE MUMMERS PARTY are not rowdy, they are haunted. Pulling inspiration from David Blackwood’s iconic The Mummer’s Veil print works, this exhibition explores the tension between comfort and oddity, humour and unease – a sentiment commonly felt by those who have witnessed or experienced mumming first hand.

Suzen Green’s exhibition The Mummers Party opens tomorrow night at 8 pm at Stride Gallery in Calgary Alberta. The exhibition runs until October 5, 2012.

-Mackenzie Frère

Tapestry by Jane Kidd and ACAD Alumni at Alberta Craft Council

Throughout my career as an artist I have explored ideas that reference my experience of the world. To do this I have chosen to work almost exclusively with the process of woven tapestry. I find Tapestry to be a compelling medium partially because it provides a means to develop content through imagery. I am also drawn to the material identity of tapestry and I am committed to finding meaning and relevance in the process of handwork.

Within my practice I employ handwork as a human centered activity that embraces risk and invention to create the potential for originality. I value skillful making and disciplinarily knowledge as a link to history and the tradition of makers. I see the labour intensive nature of my process as an embodiment of time that creates a metaphoric reference to the accumulated weight of experience and history and provides a counterpoint to the temporal nature of contemporary society. I am willing to invest in hand processes as a way to pay attention and focus on the issues that I care about. READ MORE…

See more of Kidd’s work on her website.

A second exhibition curated by Kidd, population health Negotiating Traditions: Five Approaches to Contemporary Tapestry is running concurrently with her exhibition in the Alberta Craft Council Feature Gallery

Negotiating Tradition: Five Approaches In Contemporary Tapestry brings together five artists working with the demanding process of tapestry weaving, buy Jolie Bird, emergency Murray Gibson, Judy Brown, Linda Wallace and Melissa Wong. Throughout their post secondary education these artists negotiated the use of the traditional materials and processes associated with tapestry weaving within the context of contemporary art and craft. Each has developed a dynamic contemporary practice that embraces the material identity of tapestry and acknowledges tapestries narrative traditions. Narrative or story telling is central to the European tapestry tradition; these contemporary artists employ narrative with literal, symbolic and psychological intent. READ MORE…

Shannon Stratton Appointed Critical Studies Fellow

Jessi Fraser

The third-year Weaving two class has been working hard over the past two weeks producing samples and full pieces with over six metres woven so far. It is very exciting to see the cloth grow as it travels to the cloth beam at the back of the loom. In this picture you can see the reverse (which is actually the front) of some weaving by Fibre major Jessi Fraser.

Amber Johnston

The loom has performed very well with only a few hiccups (Tara and Mackenzie can now replace bent hooks without breaking a sweat!) Here you can see one of two panels being woven today by Sculpture major Amber Johnston. This work will be cut from the loom this Friday for finishing before Monday’s critique. More to follow…
ACAD Fibre alumnus Shannon Stratton has recently been appointed Critical Studies Fellow at Cranbrook Academy of Art.

Bloomfield Hills, shop MI — Cranbrook Academy of Art is pleased to announce the appointment of the Chicago-based curator and critic Shannon Stratton as the Critical Studies Fellow for the 2012-2013 academic year. Operating as a critic at-large at the Academy, recipe Ms. Stratton will meet directly with students to promote dialogue on issues of prominence in the world of art and design. The general public will also be invited to meet Shannon Stratton and hear about her work during two public lectures at Cranbrook in the fall of 2012. Read more…

Andi Strand featured on Etsy

photo by Nicole Irene

ACAD Fibre alumnus Andi Strand was recently featured on Etsy. Congratulations Andi!

Visit Andi’s blog HERE.

Valentina Drag Ball next Friday!

Hello everyone!

As you may be aware the Valentina Drag Ball is only a week away! This event is a fundraiser for the Jasmine Valentina Herron Scholarship. All proceeds from the Valentina Drag Ball will go towards a scholarship to benefit ACAD students in honour of Jasmine Valentina Herron. The event will be held Friday February 17 at 7:00 pm in the ACAD Main Mall and the Candahar Bar in the Illingworth Kerr Gallery.

The evening will feature performances by Sleepy Panther, melanoma Cluster Fox and the DJ stylings of J Waddell. Tickets to the event are only $5 if you come in drag, and $10 if not in drag.

Can’t make it but still want to contribute to the scholarship fund?

Please consider making a donation by cheque today. Cheques should be made payable to The Alberta College of Art & Design. Indicate in the memo line that your donation is for the Jasmine Valentina Herron Scholarship.

Cheques should be mailed to:

Office of Advancement
Alberta College of Art & Design
1407 – 14 Avenue NW
Calgary, AB   T2N 4R3

In order to receive a charitable tax receipt, ensure your cheque includes your name address and phone number.

Thank you for your support and see you at the Ball!

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