Fibre Events

 

The annual Fibre show is on display in the main mall until Friday, adiposity February
10th.

Madelaine Purves-Smith presents Custom Woolen Mills Thursday Feb 16 – 3pm
Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre

The miniature show is in rm. 371 this year. Bidding has started and closes
during our reception, epilepsy Thursday February 16th, 5:30-8pm, final bids- 7:30pm.

Hope to see many of you at our talk and closing reception,
The Fibre Program

ONE MORE WEEK FOR SUBMISSIONS

THERE IS ONE WEEK LEFT TO SUBMIT TO THIS YEARS MINIATURE SHOW / SILENT AUCTION

Please consider donating.

2017 Mini poster
The ACAD Fibre program is seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.
Funds raised support visiting artists, search workshops and student-initiated projects in the Fibre program. Students, alumni, faculty and friends are encouraged to donate work for the show.

Works restricted to 12” in any direction in all mediums will be accepted.

All work must be accompanied by a submission form and dropped off at the Fibre Program office, Rm 414 by Monday, January 30th, 2017.

The Miniature Show will be displayed from February 6 – 16th. The closing event will be held Thursday, February 16th from 5.30 – 8 pm with closing bids in at 7.30 pm.

For more information or a submission form contact kellie.reid@acad.ca or asma.ismail@acad.ca

Seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

2017 Mini poster

The ACAD Fibre program is seeking submissions for the 2017 Miniature Show / Silent Auction.

Funds raised support visiting artists, troche workshops and student-initiated projects in the Fibre program. Students, pilule alumni, ed faculty and friends are encouraged to donate work for the show.

Works restricted to 12” in any direction in all mediums will be accepted.

All work must be accompanied by a submission form and dropped off at the Fibre Program office, Rm 414 by Monday, January 30th, 2017.

The Miniature Show will be displayed from February 6 – 16th. The closing event will be held Thursday, February 16th from 5.30 – 8 pm in Room 371 with closing bids in at 7.30 pm.

For more information or a submission form contact kellie.reid@acad.ca or asma.ismail@acad.ca

 

Creative work post-ACAD

My biggest fear post-grad is that I get busy with family, erectile work, emergency life, etc. and break the habit of making.  I know from experience that the practice of making, if not nurtured, will slowly wither away.  I abandoned my creativity once and I don’t want it to happen again – ever!

I posed this question to a few of our recent Fibre Grads: “What have you been doing post-ACAD to maintain and nurture your creative process”? I heard back from Marcia and Madison and this is what they had to say:

MARCIA FISHER:

Marcia's sent me this picture of her home studio space. I am totally jealous of her neatness.
Marcia’s sent me this picture of her home studio space.

With the help of Levi we have cleared a space in our little home so I can have a small studio set-up. This has helped immensely with maintaining my practice; the desire to make is always there but the follow through was inconsistent without a proper space.

Also, I have placed a sketchbook beside my bed so that I am more likely to work on ideas and mess around before bed/ in the morning as opposed to going on my phone. This has been the most successful practice for small, everyday work.

Other than that, I could always be doing better and working on my practice with more dedication. I think the major culprit here is self discipline.  😉


MADISON POTTER:
Since graduating, what have I done to nurture my creative process?
Well! Since my graduate program is geared towards administration and policy, I have been working on research projects and a community-based business development group project for the last four months.  Because of this, I have been attempting to explore exactly what my creative process has become since leaving a studio-based undergrad program.  While I still work on embroidery projects at home occasionally, I have become more interested in how my creative thinking can function as a tool for my current creative process.  This has taken the form of practicing different forms of communication (both in the realm of leadership and networking), as well as how I can use writing to express my ideas in a creative way.  I am working as a writing tutor and find the brainstorming aspect of this incredibly creative.
 

Thanks again to Marcia and Madison!  I miss seeing your faces and really appreciate your time and perspectives. Creativity will take many forms once we leave ACAD. Like Marica, I know that self-discipline will be essential.  Without instructors and constant deadlines I am in serious danger of floundering. Making art will have to become a habit that is fully integrated into my daily life!

If I hear back from anyone else I will post and update.

kellie.

Fibre Arts Book Sale!

Over reading break in my hometown I decided to try and teach people how to knit.

I hosted a Wool and the Gang knitting party where they set up the event and sell the wool but I teach the class.

IMG_3228

IMG_3295

It was very successful 13 people signed up and everyone finished there Snood Operator which was the name of the project.

 

Screen Shot 2016-02-22 at 4.51.49 PM

Screen Shot 2016-02-22 at 4.52.31 PM

Screen Shot 2016-02-22 at 4.52.13 PM

The knitting projects are super fun and for all levels of knitting and the best part is that you get your project for half the price and the host gets one for free!

Knit Parties

 

-Nicole
Luke Lindoe Library’s

Fibre Arts Book Sale

book_nerd1

February 25-27th

In conjunction with

‘Fibre Fortnight’ (https://acad.ca/fibre-fortnight-2016)

and

‘925: A Sterling Anniversary’ (https://acad.ca/925-A-Sterling-Anniversary)

Featuring the generous donation from the estate of SANDRA KRYSTALOWICH, health
award-winning Calgary quilter, physician
this sale will include

a treasure-trove of New and ‘As New’ books on all forms of Quilting, Embroidery and all aspects of the needle arts.

Thursday February 25th

ACAD Main Mall 12-5:30pm

Friday February 26th

Library 8:30am – 4:30pm

Saturday February 27th

Library 11am-5pm

CASH ONLY please (ATMs on campus)

 

Now accepting applications: 2016 Contextural Self-Directed Summer Residency Program – Deadline March 27

ball_logo

Friends and arts supporters, info

We are currently accepting applications to be part of this dynamic and vital part of Calgary’s cultural scene as participants in a self-directed summer residency and end of residency exhibition. Residency participants will have the option to work with the group to develop a community of fibre artists through workshops, treat critique sessions and exhibitions throughout the year.
We are seeking individuals who:

  • Are interested in working within a co-operative studio setting
  • Will be actively involved in, caries and contribute to, our community
  • Seek access to affordable studio space and specialized equipment
  • Are interested in sharing their knowledge and skills through teaching and collaboration
  • Appreciate and practice the diversity of textile arts and craft
  • Embrace an environmental approach to studio production
  • Are ready to commit a fee of $250 for a three-month, or $150 for one-month summer studio rental and access to equipment.
  • Will contribute to the end of summer residency exhibition.

Please visit – Contextural.ca for more information on our mission, vision, and values.

Residency Dates

One-month residencies are May 29 – July 3 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm) and July 24 – 

August 28 (with mandatory attendance for orientation & move-in on Sunday, July 24 at 1:00pm).

Three-month residency is May 29 – August 28 with mandatory attendance for orientation/move-in Sunday, May 29 at 1:00pm.

How To Apply – Please review the attached submission information package or visit contextural.ca/residency-application. Current Contextural members are only required to submit a statement of intent unless you would like to be considered for the scholarship. See the scholarship section below for details.

Deadline for submissions is Sunday, March 27th @ midnightIf accepted, residency fees are due with the acceptance form and supply order form by May 1st.

Again this year, Contextural will be offering the Contextural Summer Residency Scholarship to individuals or members applying for the three-month residency. The scholarship includes studio fees for the three-month summer residency ($250 value) and $250 for supplies.

For questions regarding the Contextural Summer Residency, please direct them to us at residency@contextural.ca

 

 

An Artist Interview with Danni Reid

I recently went to the Glenbow with my humanities class. We saw the Paul Hardy exhibit: Kaleidoscopic Animalia.
Hardy is a well known fashion designer and over the summer he was the Glenbow’s artist in residence. He scoured the Glenbow’s vault, more about collected a bunch of artifacts and then used them as inspiration for fashion displays.
The exhibit is set like a street for window shopping. There are a number of displays that combine fashion with artifacts and paintings from the Glenbow’s collection.
When my class discussed the exhibit afterwords we all found the exhibit to be very problematic and a prime example of cultural appropriation. The use of cultural artifacts as props seemed disrespectful and the mix matching of different cultures with in the same display showed a lack of awareness and information.
Usually when museums create dioramas in this manner, they feature animals and are specific and as true to life as possible. In this case, the use of mannequins suggest that this is a recreation of human history, and it is completely inaccurate. If museums are a place for learning and discovery this exhibit is teaching false information. I have mixed feelings of wether or not to suggest checking it out. If you do decide to go, go with a critical eye. This exhibit runs until May 22, 2016.

Artificial Tundra
Artificial Tundra

 
I sat down with my friend Danni Reid to interview her on her practice and where it has gone since she graduated from ACAD nearly two years ago with a major in painting. Danni has now almost completed her education degree and is interning full-time in an art classroom. I was excited to see how this affected her practice/responses.

1601570_606964899434017_5830441669082175465_n

What piece in your practice challenged you the most as an artist?

“Working big has challenged me as an artist, generic
I made a large canvas and painted it with watered down acrylic paint in hopes of creating an abstract expressionist piece. Working large has always intimidated me. However, I enjoy the challenge.”

What was the most difficult part of transitioning from being a full-time artist to also becoming an educator of it?

“Simplifying and refraining from just doing the students work for them has been my greatest challenge so far. It is very easy to just “do” then to explain something ten different times. Modifying common “art” language to meet the needs of all individuals is key.”

How has teaching art benefitted you as an artist?

“Teaching art has given me more confidence as an artist. For example, after teaching the elements and principles of design, they are now more prominent in my mind when I am working. Before teaching they had become second nature and were not given as much thought. I have become more considerate of the basics of art making.”

 

Although I am not overly cultured in the art world, it seems that education in art is a very close second for profession for working artists. I have always been interested in the effect of teaching on art, and vice versa. This was a great opportunity to begin that conversation.

-Marcia

New Craft Coalition

This past Friday I attended the opening of Charlotte Moth’s Living Images show and Celia Perrin Sidarous’ show titled Interiors, prostate Other Chambers. Both are solo exhibitions installed parallel to one another at the Esker Foundation in Inglewood.

easker

Both Moth’s and Sidarous’ work seems relevant to my practice through common themes and material interests, healing and was also eye opening in terms of installation approaches.  Moth’s work consists of comparing and contrasting different mediums, buy just as mine will. Sidarous’ work spoke most to my interests as I found it most pleasing visually. Her images of collaged and assembled found objects relates to my study of still life art. Within each ‘still life’ photo she creates, the colors became an important aspect in the composition. This is another relevant matter in my practice- color theory. Sidarous’ photographs were not all displayed at eye level as is commonly seen in a gallery setting. Rather, they were hung at varying levels and even a few pieces were resting against the wall on the floor, which only added an additional amount of satisfaction for me.

This well-curated exhibition is one I would and should return to. Openings are great social events with a bonus of  free food and cheap wine, however in order to fully appreciate the artists work it is necessary to visit at a time with less people and distractions.

-Emily

 
October 17, viagra sale
2015 – One Day Only!

Hillhurst/Sunnyside Community Centre
1320 5th Ave, viagra buy
NW, Calgary, AB T2N 0S2

Fibre for Spinning and Felting
Yarns – Lots of Hand Dyed!
Beads and Buttons – Hand Made!
Kits and Crafts
Demonstrations by Vendors

for more information, please see website
October 17, geriatrician
2015 – One Day Only!

Hillhurst/Sunnyside Community Centre
1320 5th Ave, buy cialis NW, dosage
Calgary, AB T2N 0S2

Fibre for Spinning and Felting
Yarns – Lots of Hand Dyed!
Beads and Buttons – Hand Made!
Kits and Crafts
Demonstrations by Vendors

for more information, please see website
When I was doing some research for my Grad paper I came across a Fashion designer named Sandra Backlund.

Sandra Backlund image 3

I came across some of her work in the book Knitting Fashion, and
Industry & Craft by Sandy Black, dysentery
which is found in the library.

Some things I liked in her work was her use of twists and layering. These are some ideas I have been trying to mimic. In one of my designs I would like to create a opened up cable to overlay onto a solid sweater.

Here is a link to her website and some images of her recent work:

Her Website

FW13-pic11-Photo-Kristian-Loveborg

Sandra Backlund image 2

-Nicole
New Craft Coalition Fall Show + Sale is happening this weekend!

Fri, salve
October 16 4-9 pm | Sat, viagra October 17 10-6 pm

Festival Hall, see Inglewood
1215 – 10th Avenue S.E.
Calgary, AB

$2 Admission

Fall2013Founders

The Fibre Shindig

This past Friday I attended the opening of Charlotte Moth’s Living Images show and Celia Perrin Sidarous’ show titled Interiors, prostate Other Chambers. Both are solo exhibitions installed parallel to one another at the Esker Foundation in Inglewood.

easker

Both Moth’s and Sidarous’ work seems relevant to my practice through common themes and material interests, healing and was also eye opening in terms of installation approaches.  Moth’s work consists of comparing and contrasting different mediums, buy just as mine will. Sidarous’ work spoke most to my interests as I found it most pleasing visually. Her images of collaged and assembled found objects relates to my study of still life art. Within each ‘still life’ photo she creates, the colors became an important aspect in the composition. This is another relevant matter in my practice- color theory. Sidarous’ photographs were not all displayed at eye level as is commonly seen in a gallery setting. Rather, they were hung at varying levels and even a few pieces were resting against the wall on the floor, which only added an additional amount of satisfaction for me.

This well-curated exhibition is one I would and should return to. Openings are great social events with a bonus of  free food and cheap wine, however in order to fully appreciate the artists work it is necessary to visit at a time with less people and distractions.

-Emily

 
October 17, viagra sale
2015 – One Day Only!

Hillhurst/Sunnyside Community Centre
1320 5th Ave, viagra buy
NW, Calgary, AB T2N 0S2

Fibre for Spinning and Felting
Yarns – Lots of Hand Dyed!
Beads and Buttons – Hand Made!
Kits and Crafts
Demonstrations by Vendors

for more information, please see website

Miniature Show auction item by ACAD Alumni Sarah Nordean

Sarah Nordean is an ACAD Alumni and recent graduate of Emily Carr’s MAA program.  Presently Sarah is part of a group exhibition at The Stride Gallery Could it be, malady We’ve Surpassed Material Expectation  on at Stride’s main space until April 3rd 2015.  Sarah has generously created and donated Composition #2  for the Fibre departments upcoming Miniature Show Auction. We know, this we’ve got great friends! Thank you Sarah!

Composition #2, <a href=
medic 2015 Sarah Nordean” width=”442″ height=”443″ /> Composition #2, 2015 Sarah Nordean

 In concept, format, and process, my art practice is an exploration of rhythm and its relationships with ritual, time, and place. I look beyond spectacle toward the rhythm of seemingly mundane or insignificant actions and ways of making art using repetition and serialization, repetitive mark-making, everyday sounds, and simple materials. My work builds up over time through cumulative gestures and considers ideas of labour, obsession and futility. I attempt to echo the relentless nature of everyday life as a way to showcase simplicity, to highlight small differences, and to acknowledge the inevitable complexities. -Sarah Nordean

www.sarahnordean.com

Karin McGinn

Congratulations Christine Thomson

For this English class with Derek I have really being trying to push my poetry within my practice. I have been trying to make successful artwork that integrates my poetry with my hand drawn imagery. Derek has shown us so many great examples of Canadian poetry in this course that is contemporary and different than any poetry I had read before. It pushed me to re-think my own writing process and think about what I would like the reader of my poetry to understand. I have been juxtaposing my poetry with my simple hand drawn images of banal everyday objects that are not normally important objects to remember. I try to sift through my memories and pull out the fragmented pieces within my writing of an experience that is now broken. I also want my hand drawn imagery to be pathetic and feel like although these objects are banal that they are still important and can reference people, health care places and time.

Both of these pieces seen above are in response to books of poetry that Derek showed to us in his course. Boat Ride is in response to the book Testament by Dennis Lee which is about the apocalypse. For this artwork I wanted to explore a time in my childhood when I felt like I was going to die on a boat ride I went on when I was about 3. My own personal apocalypse. We were at my family cabin and decided to go boating on the lake nearby and we had way too many people in our boat. I remember vividly being forced to go on the boat even though I didn’t want to because my parents weren’t going to be on the boat with me. Eventually . . . the boat started to fill up with water and then we were all in the middle of the lake with floatation devices waiting for another boat to rescue us and take us back to shore. Although it sounds like I remember a lot from this time all of this is somewhat fragmented and I only remember bits and pieces of it. I wanted to capture my feelings in this memory with my poetry and juxtapose it with an image of a boat key.

My second piece Garage Light was in response to a book called Decomp by Stephen Collis and Jordan Scott which is about letting Darwin’s book about evolution decay in nature and what the authors were left with to create poetry from. They both wanted nature to read the 5 books they left in different climates all over British Columbia. After reading this book I had thoughts about my interest in objects decaying and falling apart. I’ve always been a big fan of rusting and rust dyeing so I thought it would be a good time to bring this interest back into my practice. Garage Light is about the house I grew up in when I was a child and how it is very much so falling apart and decomposing. My parents did a lot of renovations on this house that we no longer live in and when I go back to visit it many of these past renovations are still there. I thought it would be interesting to put together an image of our garage light falling apart and rusting with poetry from what I remember most while my parents were going through renovations. This was mostly my brother and I getting told off for doing something we weren’t supposed to be doing at the time.

Titling my artwork has been another important aspect to my work lately because I feel that if I am not choosing the right titles people will not understand why the writing and the imagery go together. I am still trying to fine tune this body of work and will continue to do so throughout my time in Derek’s class.

 

-Vaughan McMillan
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Recent Fibre graduate Christine Thomson has won the American Tapestry Alliance Award. Congratulations Christine!

Since 2011 there have been three winners of the ATA award from ACAD including Christine, melanoma
Sabrina Niebler and Rachel Betts-Wilmott.

Amazing moms of Sunnyside school: Part 3) Sarah Nordean

In my final interview with the “amazing moms of Sunnyside, plague ”  I spoke with Sarah Nordean an ACAD 2009 graduate of painting. Sarah recently earned herself another milestone in her artistic endeavours by graduating from emily carr’s  MA program; Congratulations Sarah!

1) In your work Ticks, you record the amount of time that it took to complete, with textile materials there is also a laborious element that becomes part  of the narrative. Is this time spent with your material an important part of your process?
Although I do not usually make this known about the work, Ticks is a direct result of motherhood. I developed this project as a way of dealing with time constraints. As a loner, I am energized through time spent by myself. Before starting a family, I would spend hours at a time making art, thinking, and researching. I would often be in the studios at ACAD until closing. Now, as a mother of two young children, part of my art practice is dedicated to carving out moments of aloneness or focus, however short. These moments have become routinized and ritualized. The restrictions of daily life dictate the times that I may spend alone, and as such, I have come to live a somewhat regimented life. The very early morning before my family wakes, brief moments during the day, or the evenings when they go to sleep are the times when I walk, write, read and make art. These moments are not long, and because of this I have made a habit of taking and using every second that is available, and found ways to spend this time productively. Ticks shows how my practice has evolved to include ways of working that consider the allotment of time, and allows an immediate engagement with process, like turning a switch or pressing a button. On, then off.
 
I can imagine that some aspects of a fibre practice could work the same way, methods where it is possible to walk away and come back to the work without compromising it.
 
As far as the time spent with the material being an important part of the process. Absolutely. I wanted to repeat a tiny inconsequential mark over and over as a way to infuse it with a kind of generated importance. A boring mark using cheap ink on cheap paper – I am interested in what happens when the mundane is treated as monumental, and the ideas of rhythm, labour and obsession that are related to this. I definitely see a relationship with textile arts, and think my tick could be seen as a stitch.
 
I find the work of Jolie Bird to be so inspiring in this respect. I could stare at her wrapped objects forever imagining every turn of the thread. I also love Germaine Koh’s Knitwork that has been accumulating for the last 22 years!
 
2) Now that graduation is upon you, what are your future art plans?
Now I want to be an artist! Like a real one. I have just started calling myself one, and I almost don’t feel like an impostor when I say it. I have one kid in school and my youngest will be there soon, and I can’t wait to spend more time in my studio. I also would like to get an art related job, as being in the studio and only emerging to interact with children might make me a bit crazy. I really like to interact with other adults and occasionally wear pantyhose. I would love to work for an arts organization, a museum, an artist-run centre, or a college. I was a teacher in one of my previous lives, and I would really like to teach again in a post-secondary setting. I will need to strengthen my art practice before that happens, though. In the meantime, I am applying for everything.
3) If you could give your younger self some art advice, what would it be?
Maybe put in a minimal amount of effort in trying to get your artwork seen by people. Why not apply for something? Figure out what an artist needs to do.
Expose yourself to more CONTEMPORARY art, not just art history. (I think this would have made being a part of the art world seem like a possibility, something that people actually did)
Go to a dedicated art school like ACAD, and not to the art program in a larger university. (I have done both, and the experiences at ACAD and Emily Carr have been far superior to a large university program. In fact, I think this could have addressed the above two issues of knowing what an artist needs to do, and for it even to seem like a possibility.)
This is a tough one, but think about your concept as on the same level as your technique. It is not enough for me now to just make something pretty.
 And finally, make more and fail more. Failure has been such a key to any of the success (however minor) that I have experienced.
 (Of course, my younger self would never have listened to anyone giving her advice.
If you’d like to see more of this artists work I’ve provided a link to her website here SarahNordean
A special thank you again to Sarah, Janine and Laura for taking the time out of their very busy lives to patiently answer my questions. This has been a rewarding and inspiring experience.
-Karin McGinn

Amazing moms of Sunnyside: Three local artists/designers share their success in the creative world

As a fibre student and mom of  three young boys, website I’m always interested in hearing how other artists with families navigate their careers in between children and time constraints. In this three part series, I’ve interviewed three ACAD Alumni who also happen to be parents at the same local school school that my children attend.

The artists/designers are Laura Sharp, Janine Vangool & Sarah Nordean. In each interview I’ll provide a snapshot into their individual creative practice, how they do it and what inspires them.

 

Laura Sharp ACAD Alumni 2006

The first artist I’ve interviewed is Laura Sharp, ACAD 2006 graduate of  Ceramics. Laura maintains a full-time studio out of her home. She’s also one of the founding members of Market Collective & Craft Coalition. 

Janine Vangool ACAD Alumni 1995

Next, I talk to Janine Vangool, an ACAD 1995 graduate of the Visual Communications. Janine is the Creator of  UPPERCASE magazine; a beautiful designed quarterly magazine for the creative and curious.

Sarah Nordean ACAD Alumni 2009
Sarah Nordean ACAD Alumni 2009

And finally, Sarah Nordean is slated to complete her Masters of Applied Arts program (MAA) this month from emily carr University of Art & Design. Previously, an ACAD 2009 graduate of Painting and before that Sarah completed her degree in Art Education from the University of Victoria (2000).

 

Stay Tuned!

Karin McGinn

Fibre Alumni Exhibition

Miyake was born 22 April 1938 in Hiroshima, bulimics Japan. He studied graphic design at the Tama Art University in Tokyo, graduating in 1964. After graduation, he worked in Paris and New York City.

Returning to Tokyo in 1970, he founded the Miyake Design Studio, a high-end producer of women’s fashion.  There is the link about issey Miyake Fall-winter fashion show.

The opening of the  show is fantastic. I think that the music is classic Japanese rhyme. He like use unusual material to design the garments at the opening of the show.

issey miyake Fall-winter 2014/15 womenswear fashion show

The following image is about his spring collection 2014.

The dress cutting is quite simple but the color can catch people’s eyes. It is a bright idea to make the  from white to colorful then colorful to white.

It like a review for viewers.

_TEN0010.1366x2048 _TEN0401.1366x2048 _TEN0458.1366x2048 _TEN0498.1366x2048

-yuanyuan Ping

alumni-poster

The ACAD Fibre Program is pleased to announce a new pop up gallery. The National Gallery of Contemporary Fibre Art will feature work from students, urologist
alumni and even objects from historical textile collections. Please join us on Thursday September 25th at 5pm for a welcome back potluck and reception for our current exhibition of twenty three Fibre Alumni including:

Jolie Bird, pilule
Heather Bloxham, cost
Un-Jin Cho, Morgan Free, Suzen Green, Anu Guha-Thakirta, Jasmine Herron, Lindsay Joy, Jane Kidd (honorary), Amanda Kriaski, Julie Morstad, Bill Morton, Andrew Penner, Sheena Perratt, Ester Scott, Angela Silver, Marci Simkulet, Romy Straathof, Shannon Stratton, Candice Tarnowski, Wendy Toogood, Melissa Wong and Stephanie Wong.

This inaugural exhibition showcases a cross section of traditional and experimental fibre techniques dating back to the 1960’s. All pieces are on loan from the private collections of the Fibre Program faculty and will be on display until September 30th.

Contextural Residency Show “Organic Matters” Opening Reception Tonight 6-8!

Hi everyone, information pills

Here is a sneak preview of some pictures from the Contextural Fibre Co-operative Groups Show currently being shown in the Marion Nicoll Gallery, viagra Room 371 & the ACAD Storefront Jubilee Window. The opening reception is tonight from 6-8pm. 

This past June 2014 I participated in the residency program and here is what I found out about this Calgary based Fibre co-operative group. The Contextural Residency Program is a great meeting place for ACAD students to come together with ACAD Alumni, teachers and other like- minded artists. Residency members have the printing and the emulsion room for use , you also get a private studio area (hours are 7am-11pm).I did find that most people have differing schedules and it was quieter than I anticipated.

What I’ve enjoyed most about the residency program has been seeing the culmination of everyones work put into the Organic Matters Show. Its truly a great opportunity for students to participate in a show alongside some very talented artists. I almost have too many favourite pieces to mention, but I especially LOVED  Jolie Bird’s “Le pick- up” painting. Her mastery in combining painting with thread is superb and something that I’m striving for in my own work. Ginni Armitage’s “A Day Dream,” really did feel dreamy, she makes working with paper look easy.

I’ve added a link if anyone is interested about Contextural

I’ll see you tonight at the opening reception!

-Karin McGinn