2014 Miniature Show Silent Auction + Exhibition

Bronwyn Schuster is a young Canadian artist whose work spans several mediums. She primarily paints, troche and within the past year has been involved with an artist residency in Quebec, dentist and is attending The Swedish Academy of Realist Art. Her works touches upon several subjects, including self portraiture, and work that can be described as fantastical. She has created jewelry, art dolls, paintings large and small, commercial work, and is an avid member of several art scenes.

The Scarf- Self Portrait (Bronwyn Schuster, 2013)

(Question) How would you describe yourself as an artist?

(Answer) First question and you’ve already stumped me. I figure a lot of the artist I am is still trapped inside of me, as I lack some of the skills to express what it is that I imagine. I also don’t really know where me begins and artist ends. Mostly though, I am a tea drinking, generally happy, slightly ethereal, wannabe realist painter who uses surrealism far to much as a crutch when things go wrong.

The Swedish Academy of Realist Art                           Photo credit: Bronwyn Schuster

What is the school you are attending, and why did you choose to go there?

The Swedish Academy of Realist (aka SARA {aka Atelier Stockholm}) is a magical school that will pull at the heartstrings of any golden age nostalgist. SARA is built on the tradition of European fine arts ateliers where master painters would take on apprentices, teaching them techniques through a rigid academic approach to figure drawing and painting. Quite simply, we spend the days hunched over Charles Bargue lithographs, copying line for line and shade for shade is precise detail. This is broken up in the day with live model drawing, anatomy and materials lectures. After graduating from lithographs you move onto copying casts, then onto oil painting and still lifes. It’s a three year course, and 8 hour days. Possibly the most intensive immersion into fine arts you could find. Which is precisely why I chose to attend. There is something still striking and haunting about the oil paintings of old. They were true masters of their technique, and it’s not something you can learn at just any school. At SARA I know I am learning in relatively the same fashion that the masters did themselves, and I can even trace the lineage of my teachers (it goes back to Leonardo da Vinci!) I am a pure romanticist too. I really couldn’t imagine attending any other kind of school.

Inspired- Egon Schiele (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

What inspires or influences your different styles? For example, what inspired your Animal Magnetism series, and your self portrait series?

My inspirations are in a constant flux and change. At the moment I have noticed a strong influence from my fellow classmates, and at the same time the Swedish style of living. But, I find it difficult to explain my inspiration because I am such a visual person. You’ll just have to come over for tea so that I can show you. I can, however, explain how my self portrait series came about. One fine winter morning, out in the prairies of Saskatchewan, I found myself very frustrated with my particular art skill level and inability to paint portraits. This was the time before I had means to attend SARA, so I took it upon myself to research up artists I admired, delve into their life story and then try to replicate their style. I figured trying to mimic their techniques would teach me something, and choosing to paint myself gave me both 24/7 access to a live model (who I did not have to impress) and it insured that I wasn’t directly copying a painters art work. Thus my “Inspired By” self portrait series was born. I may have also had some influence by my photographer friend Susan Knight who had started a similar project in digital media. The animal people though? I can’t explain that. I have no clue where that came from …

Red Riding Hood (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Have you ever experienced artists’ block? What do you do to counter it?

Ah, artists block. I know you well. Artist block comes in many forms for me. There is technical artist block for starters. It’s when I’ve got the ideas, the subject, the materials and everything in front of me, and then I start working and EVERYTHING feels wrong. No matter what I do, I can’t replicate what I see in front of me or in my mind. It might be the most frustrating form of artists block for me. Usually it happens right on a huge learning curve, and you just have to power through it. But sometimes it’s good to take a break. Make something nice to drink and try again later. Generally I have to remember that it is not as bad as I think it is. Creative artists block usually happens due to lack of sleep. That’s when I rest and let the pressure go. If it lasts more than two days, then I’m just being lazy. Creativity is a muscle. You have to exercise it. Try new things. Write. Research, and have interesting conversations with people. Last of all artists blocks is procrastination. This one is sneaky. It comes in the form of “But I need to do this first!” Be that: make food, finish a chapter of a book, check facebook, do your taxes, organize something, go to the store, research something, watch a youtube video (who are you trying to kid). These are not important (okay, maaaybe food and taxes are) always put aside time for art and always use that time for art. As my friend Vincent always likes to say “What do we say to the god of unproductivity? … Not today!”

Artist block is not a valid excuse. Go make some art!

Inspired- Leonor Fini (Bronwyn Schuster, 2012)

Bronwyn’s artwork et al can be found here: http://bronwynschuster.com/

 

-Emmelia Taylor

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, pharm
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 

The Reparative Impulse

 

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, approved
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, tadalafil
but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

I found this and had to share it – especially for anyone else who is going through the “fourth year-final semester” angst. This kinda just says it all for me – and is a bit apropos for the readings that we are doing in Fibre 451, pilule
Grad class.

Hemorrhoids
Sept. 23, 2013″ src=”http://fibre.acadnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Sartre-Recipes-New-Yorker-470×422.jpeg” width=”470″ height=”422″ /> New Yorker Magazine, Sept. 23, 2013

 

Pick a pencil. Any pencil. Are you sure that is the right one? Maybe a pen.Or a brush. Grab some paper. What colour paper? Maybe you want a canvas. Or try organza. What colour warp? But are you sure you want to weave this? Take another look. What about mixed media for that. How do you know? etc.

lol. Christine

 

 

 

 
2014 MiniatureHello ACAD Community, read more

The annual Miniature Show Silent Auction and Exhibition is calling for submissions!

The Miniature Show will be exhibited as part of Fibre Fortnight March 10th-21st, cheap in the Main Mall. The silent auction will run until Thursday the 20th, physician
final bids at 6:30pm. All proceeds from the auction will be donated to Fibre Department for funding visiting artists and student enrichment.

Submitted artworks must be of 12”x12″x12″ or smaller, of any medium and subject matter. Artworks are accepted from all departments, students, faculty and alumni.

To submit work please email the title, medium, size, artist name, and a short description of any details by February 28th. All artwork can be delivered to the Fibre Department March 10th -14th.

Please email submissions to Natalie Lauchlan at natalie.lauchlan@acad.ca

Cheers,

The Fibre Department

Tracey Emin on Fashion

IMG_3190sewing

Please click on the link above. It’s a short clip of me working on my long arm sewing machine.  Instead of moving the fabric, dosage on a long arm, you move the machine.  The reason it is called a long arm is because the arm is 18″ long compared to 6″ to 10″ on a regular sewing machine.  Also, most long arm machines are 8′ to 14′ long.  Mine is currently set at 10′ which works well for me.  My studio isn’t very big so 10′ is the max.  It can hold most quilts on it.  Anyway, I love my long arm.  I can quilt 18″ by the width of a quilt up to 9′ in a much shorter time than I could with my regular machine.

Margaret Jessop
oh my gosh, remedy how did I not know about this.

 

-Natalie

Textìlsetur Island Residency | My Summer 2014

This evening, pfizer after finishing soldering parts today, recipe and working on the larger housing for these electronic components, viagra I did a final test of the work. When I plugged in the power I had the voltage set at 6V, which is much too high voltage for this tiny chip. When I put too much voltage through something that can’t handle it, I fried everything. This is the kind of thing that happens when you are not thinking clearly, from being too tired, from working on the same thing too long, or from many other things related to the end of the semester.

Maybe it’s simply because I am an amateur still and I am learning things the hard way. Needless to say, lesson learned.

RIP little guy.

Dead little speaker, dead little chip, dead little microphone, dead little chip, dead little sensor. Massacre.
Dead little speaker, dead little chip, dead little microphone, dead little chip, dead little sensor. Massacre.

 

 
 

As a few of you may already know, discount
I will be spending June, July and August of 2014 on residency at the Icelandic Textile Centre in Blönduòs, Iceland. The residency is uniquely for textile artists, and I highly recommend all of you apply. Facilities include:

Weaving Rooms: They have looms of two differents sizes: 80 and 140cm. They are 4, 6 or 8 shafts Counter-balanced. Residents have full access to weaving equipment: large selection of reeds, warping reel, distaff holders, shuttles, yarn reels etc.

Dyeing Rooms: It is a full scale natural dyeing room.  Provided with a small movable oven, dyeing tools, the same large sink and a drying space which is well divided. Iceland produces is known for its various dyestuffs, such as lychens of various colors, plants and flowers.

The Summer Festival is what I will be there for, and what I am most interested in. Summer Festival is where the artists of the residency, and surrounding area, make large scale (and small scale) outdoor installation works to celebrate the season, daylight and community. Expressing the passing of time, the changing of seasons, and the interaction between peoples through outdoor installation. I want to be part of this festival for the rest of my life, this is what I live for.

Here is a quote from the  2013 Summer Festival at the Textílsetúr Island Icelandic Textile Centre:

We are gleaners.

Our language relies on materiality;
Rusted industrial scraps, seaweed, wool, old sheets, jumpsuits;
Borrowed and re-interpreted milliner techniques.
We’re discovering points of reflection that hint towards metaphysical meaning.
Some say there is an inherent biological tendency for equilibrium.
One is to leave a skin of time, their pieces of vulnerability stripped by weathering and human treatments.

We are what we touch- smell, see, hear, taste.

There is a clarity, a peacefulness on the mountain, it effects your whole being. We become this mountain, this stillness, this landscape.
The elements vibrate through us, her wind rippling taut green strings on rusted forms.
A wave of modulation surfs until it breaks, and all you see is a framed landscape – the sun atop the ocean.

2013 Summer Festival

This is where I am meant to be.

Here is the link the website where you can find out more about the residency, and more about how to apply.

http://textilsetur.com/home-page/

-Natalie

Learning Electronic Basics the Hard Way

This evening, thumb after finishing soldering parts today, and working on the larger housing for these electronic components, I did a final test of the work. When I plugged in the power I had the voltage set at 6V, which is much too high voltage for this tiny chip. When I put too much voltage through something that can’t handle it, I fried everything. This is the kind of thing that happens when you are not thinking clearly, from being too tired, from working on the same thing too long, or from many other things related to the end of the semester.

Maybe it’s simply because I am an amateur still and I am learning things the hard way. Needless to say, lesson learned.

RIP little guy.

Dead little speaker, dead little chip, dead little microphone, dead little chip, dead little sensor. Massacre.
Dead little speaker, dead little chip, dead little microphone, dead little chip, dead little sensor. Massacre.

 

 

Natalie Lauchlan Shifting Gears | Catalyst Magazine

Published in the Craft and Emerging Media section of Catalyst Magazine 2013
Published in the Craft and Emerging Media section of Catalyst Magazine 2013
Published in the Craft and Emerging Media section of Catalyst Magazine 2013
Published in the Craft and Emerging Media section of Catalyst Magazine 2013

This month I had the honour of being published in ACAD’s publication Catalyst Magazine. The magazine features interviews with Alumni, caries Students, Faculty and Donors from all schools of the college working in a variety of areas.

The experience was overwhelming, I was never really sure if I was going to make it in to the actual publication as numerous artists were interviewed, but I was honoured and surprised when I was told by a fellow Fibre major that I was featured in this year’s issue.

Though the article is based on an interview with me about my journey as a student and emerging artist much editing was done. It was really interesting to see how my words are changed to fit the tone of the rest of the publication, and the way it alters my voice into that of the author. I was also really interested to see what elements of the interview were used in the article and which were left out. The art of writing and publishing is so interesting, taking facts and stories and shaping them into a cohesive publication, I really admire the work of Brieanne Biblow in charge of writing and publishing the magazine, and other special projects at ACAD.

I am incredibly flattered and pleased to have had this opportunity, and honestly a little reticent to share this publication here. I hope Laura Vickerson doesn’t mind her mention.

(click image for larger/legible version)

 

 

 

“Art is quite a lonely pursuit…” Tracey Emin Collaborates with Harland Miller

Tracey Emin took part in a collaborative series with Harland Miller, rx which was exhibited in September 2013 with The London EDITION.

Tracey Emin is general consumed by her work, hair and purposefully isolates herself to allow for completely engulfing in her practice. Her participation in a collaboration surprised me. Here’s a link to a video interview between Miller and Emin, which is also exhibited as part of the exhibition.

On Collaboration: Tracey Emin x Harland Miller on Nowness.com

http://www.nowness.com/day/2013/10/17/3393/on-collaboration-tracey-emin-x-harland-miller

-Natalie

17041961 | Upcoming Exhibition at Stride Gallery +15

Guess Who Am I #2
Guess Who Am I #2

buy cialis ‘serif'”>This is another self-portrait I created that is related to the previous embroidery I have shown in class. Again, prostate I do not want to reveal who I am yet. I want viewers to guess and you will all find out the answer in the final critique next week.

Details of Guess Who Am I #2
Details of Guess Who Am I #2

I think this embroidery is more successful than the first one. I was very confident during the process of making. It took me less time to finish it which was awesome! I do agree that the more you practice the better you get! I am in love with embroidery more and more every day. My friends compliment how realistic and detailed it looks which encourage me to continue working with this technique. I will possibly keep on working this series of my self-portraits next semester. 

(This is not how I will present in the critique; I just haven’t bought the frame for this work yet)

Wendy

The cycle of abuse is much like a cycle of life, doctor
moving through motions of forgetting and
remembering, more about
and forgetting again. An act of violence, the feeling of neglect, the power of fear,
drain a victim. Through a victims every motion they must fight the restraints of shame and doubt, hurt and fear. There is temporary comfort and ease in a moment of reassurance. A
momentary trust in the sweet talking. Smoothing over the trauma with hollow words.

Candy coat
the pain, forget and move on.
 

The cycle of abuse is much like a cycle of life, site
moving through motions of forgetting and
remembering, resuscitator
and forgetting again. An act of violence, viagra 40mg
the feeling of neglect, the power of fear,
drain a victim. Through a victims every motion they must fight the restraints of shame and doubt, hurt and fear. There is temporary comfort and ease in a moment of reassurance. A
momentary trust in the sweet talking. Smoothing over the trauma with hollow words.

Candy coat
the pain, forget and move on.
The cycle of abuse is much like a cycle of life, Syphilis
moving through motions of forgetting and
remembering, store
and forgetting again. An act of violence, the feeling of neglect, the power of fear,
drain a victim. Through a victims every motion they must fight the restraints of shame and doubt, hurt and fear. There is temporary comfort and ease in a moment of reassurance. A
momentary trust in the sweet talking. Smoothing over the trauma with hollow words.

Candy coat
the pain, forget and move on.


The cycle of abuse is much like a cycle of life, view
moving through motions of forgetting and
remembering, pills
and forgetting again. An act of violence, the feeling of neglect, the power of fear,
drain a victim. Through a victims every motion they must fight the restraints of shame and doubt, hurt and fear. There is temporary comfort and ease in a moment of reassurance. A
momentary trust in the sweet talking. Smoothing over the trauma with hollow words.

Candy coat
the pain, forget and move on.

 

-Natalie
17041961 by Natalie Lauchlan will be shown in the STRIDE Gallery +15 window December 2013 & January 2014, shop
at the EPCOR Centre for the Performing Arts. The Closing Reception on Thursday, January 16th from 6-7pm, refreshments to follow at Wine-Ohs (811 1st Street SW).

Installation by Natalie Lauchlan
Installation by Natalie Lauchlan

This project is inspired by the blindness of my mother, who has lost her vision very tragically and rapidly. This loss of her vision froze her perception of reality in the time of her memories. Individuals in her world ceased to age, and her interactions with the world around her became one of fragments of her past constructed into an imaginary perception modified daily with sound and touch. The blackness that surrounds her is pure and impenetrable. This blackness is a new reality, a transformation, she has become a new individual reacting in a world unrecognizable to her. This rebirth in a new form so fragile and frightened by her new state of being is embodied in the ashes trapped in the glass bulbs. Light bulbs that are transparent and non functional, whose form is described by the burnt fragments of tactile and precious memory, that of photographs. The transformed and fragile state of the photographs trapped inside the lightless glass is how I see my mother.

After multiple treatments and surgeries this summer, my mother now has roughly 40% of her vision, it feels like a miracle. I am so fortunate.

 

More information about the exhibition can be found at the following links:

http://www.stride.ab.ca/upcoming.html

http://artrubicon.com/4409/natalie-lauchlan-17041961-stride-15-window-dec-jan-calgary/

-Natalie

31541 3714 | A Performance by Natalie Lauchlan

Beth Cavener Stichter

Kate MacDowell

These videos are of two different ceramic artist’s that I really find inspiring, buy perhaps not completely in the direction my work is going while writing my grad paper. I could repeat what Stichter says in her video that her work is based off of people she encounters and makes portraits of what she imagines their inner turmoil is possibly, cure but they are equally a portrait of herself as well. What first drew me to her work was a rabbit that displayed to much emotion that you couldn’t help but find in yourself that feeling that it expressed. The sculptures large scale allows you to see each sculpt of the clay, and I terribly wish to touch one. With the size also its impressive how much I can imagine someone physically relating to them on a human scale.

I Am No One by Beth Cavener Stichter, Stoneware, 32″ x 37″ x 30″

Without getting into Kate MacDowell’s concept too far, she first inspired me when I was making my small wire skeletons. Everything seemed so fragile and precious in her work so I reflected on that with my work and what I wanted to protect in my hands. I Highly recommend if your interested to follow the links.

Sparrow by Kate MacDowell made out of Porcelian

Zo~

 The Reparative Impulse

The ACAD Fibre Department hosted a most charming lecture with UK artist Yvonne Mullock on November 6, Phimosis
2013. Yvonne has a multidisciplinary research-led practice that has taken her ( so far, but look out world!) to various parts of the western world, including Newfoundland, Kentucky, Argyle, Bute and Hertfordshire. She was able to give students 20 minutes of her time for studio visits, responses and a talk. As I found her presentation and her work so inspirational, I used my 20 minutes to ask her questions about her life, process and some vagrant ideas.

Yvonne’s B.A. degree is from the Glasgow School of Art in Painting and Drawing. I was interested in the transition between the discipline of painting and drawing and the multidisciplinary work that she is currently engaged with. Yvonne discussed the fact that she sees no division between her training as a painter and the practice that she is pursuing. She feels that as an artist she draws inspiration from things that surround her in her life. Mullock went on to say that the Glasgow School was very traditional, and that although her work in realistic painting was what was being taught and expected of her, she felt stifled by that form. Upon graduation, and a small inheritance from her Auntie Joan, Yvonne went to London to visit a friend. It was there that she chanced upon the Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum, and talked to the Education Program Director about the potential of a residency. The Museum had never been broached about a possibility like this before, and luckily for Mullock the Director had an arts background and so was receptive to the idea. Yvonne searched out and received some funding, and was installed in an absentee biologist’s office for her studio residency. She remarked upon the excitement of it all: immersed in a real biologist’s office, who was off in Belize doing field work, and full access to the Museum. For her it was also about being active in something that wasn’t boring and stuffy as the Glasgow School, but an adventure that she was formulating herself, and working in response to.

Yvonne’s DIY sense of independence comes through in her practice; both in what she is making and in her understanding and appreciation of the tactile material world of craft and art. ( We never touched on that issue, thank goodness, as we only had 20 minutes and not a full evening and a bottle of wine). To illustrate, Mullock tells a story about the choice of a gift when she was younger. She was offered a watch, but begged for a sewing machine. This was to be a formative decision, as she taught herself how to sew, and has used that skill extensively in her practice, both with her work in the costume department of theatre and opera and in her art practice.

Also evident is Yvonne’s sense of humour in her work. I asked her about negotiating the “art stars” of the art world and how, with her honesty and direct approach to life she deals with large egos and the artificiality that can surround that world. She responded by likening it to working in opera and stage, where she was always given the more strange or difficult talent to work with. She enjoys the challenge of the “strange and odd” ( Mullock), again which is evident in her work ( look at her series of the cross- Canadian art quilt images, where the quilts are designed with holes for the female breasts to be displayed). Again charmingly and bluntly, she did tell me that she “loved weirdos” but was not good with dealing with (expletive deleted) rude people.

The interaction with people is evident again in her work; many of her research-led projects deal with entering a community and interacting therein. The Fogo Island residency, where she was formative in spearheading the soft furnishing cultural display of the Fogo Island Inn, involved researching the hand crafts of the local villagers, from quilting to rughooking. The islanders, due to the sense of thrift and being some of the original upcyclers, make their quilts and rugs from scraps of unrepairable and unused clothing and worn out household linens that can be cut around and reused. Mullock’s So to Sew interactive performance at Wreck City involved using the “reparative impulse” to mend clothing that was brought to her, with love and care. At the end of the repair, she sewed in a label with her name to commemorate the act, and her participants left with a memento of remembrance from Yvonne, as well as a mended article of clothing. When I was listening to Mullock talk, the “reparative impulse” as coined by Jeanne Randolph kept playing in my head. Sure enough, I found the quote in Jane Kidd’s “To Practice in the Middle”:

      The reparative impulse is altruistic, generous, and synthetic. It does not cast out  what is impure or ruined.It restructures,reinterprets, and illuminates the potential of the impure subject, object, idea or form. The reparative impulse attempts an integration of grief for the lost ideal with the desire to make good for injury done.Reparative action is the endeavour to restore. Rather than hiding traces of damage, it integrates them with grief of the lost ideal and the remaining qualities of value. (Randolph)

This terminology seems to encapsulate the impulse in Mullock. She enacts both altruism and generosity in her work, and is willing to look at the value of the lost ideal. Her Samoyed fur jacket, knit for a stuffed dead ( obviously, if it was stuffed) Mexican Hairless dog in the Rothschild Zoological Museum, is another example of her altruism, however idealistic.

In closing we talked about the concept of the triangle of Scotland/Fogo Island/Calgary. I asked her about that juxtaposition from a cultural viewpoint. I could see the similarities, both economically and geographically, between Fogo Island and Scotland, but Calgary’s oil and gas economy and conservative mentality must have been a bit of an adjustment for her. The move was prompted by her partner’s involvement with the Watershed + Public Art Project with the City of Calgary. Mullock responded that she is optimistic about the new territory here to explore and investigate. I found her both personally and professionally to be an inspirational and encouraging artist and speaker, with an unorthodox “breath of fresh air” approach to her work.

Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk
Yvonne Mullock, Zoology. Image from www.yvonnemullock.co.uk

– Submitted by Christine Thomson

 

The cycle of abuse is much like a cycle of life, website
moving through motions of forgetting and
remembering, and forgetting again. An act of violence, the feeling of neglect, the power of fear,
drain a victim. Through a victims every motion they must fight the restraints of shame and doubt, hurt and fear. There is temporary comfort and ease in a moment of reassurance. A
momentary trust in the sweet talking. Smoothing over the trauma with hollow words.

Candy coat
the pain, forget and move on.

 

-Natalie

Jean Baudrillard carefully disassembles all my perceived understandings.

Absence is defined as the state of being away from a place, there or person, shop with an implication of it being temporary.

This temporality is at the core of grief, myocarditis it is what amplifies the void left by an individual, by something precious. The emptiness, the lacking. A chair is no longer an object, but is obscured by it’s lack of human presence, the absence of an occupant.

Throughout my practice I have explored implied absence, it’s accessibility in a way so intimate. When there is an element removed, an implied motion through stillness, an isolation through space, a great sound through silence. The understanding of a presence through it’s lack of presence is fascinating to me, a point of entry, a trigger, like a haunting of a moment passed.

Home Is Where The Heart Is  by Natalie Lauchlan. Found cloth in abandoned home installation.
Home Is Where The Heart Is
by Natalie Lauchlan.
Found cloth in abandoned home installation.

It is this exploration that has brought me to instillation, to an object in space. Instillation is an existence in isolation, it is in sense living itself as it changes with time in the space. Documented, it magnifies it’s unique existence, free from humans, free from any singular ownership, it exists in itself. This lack of humans speaks to loss, to absence, but also amplifies the importance of the object. this making the object both clearer, and also more obscured.

Jean Baudrillard, a contemporary philosopher, writer, artist and faculty member at the European Graduate School in Switzerland, discusses the aesthetics of absence in his literary work  Integral Reality. Baudrillard writes:

The object brings back the subject to life not in its relative presence, but in its irreducible absence.

It is this statement that has disassembled my understanding of my practice, taking it away from an understanding of loss deeply rooted in my every action, to a direct relationship with it. It has made me consider that loss is the primary concept behind every work of art I have ever created, if loss and absence overshadow all other conceptual understandings I have ever had.

And when I go... by Natalie Lauchlan cotton on cotton installation.
And when I go…
by Natalie Lauchlan
cotton on cotton installation. 

I am now exploring this new understanding, as if looking through a window that has been fogged to give me a clear view of my own reflection.

 

http://www.egs.edu/faculty/jean-baudrillard/articles/integral-reality/

 

– Natalie

7 628 | Performance by Natalie Lauchlan

7 628, for sale performed by Natalie Lauchlan on September 26th 2013, deals with similar ideas to work by Stephen G.A. Mueller which I blogged about earlier, when I was completely awestruck by how incredibly similar our ideas were.

My performance is meshed between the preciousness of hair, it’s personal significance, and the act of physically giving it away.

Repeating the act of brushing, ripping, tying, cutting and giving I fell into a trance like state of separation. Isolated by the intensity of emotion, I move through the motions, trapped in a recollection of movement. Giving away myself, my history, my presence.

To quote Stephen G.A. Mueller,

“It is through the repetition of a cathartic act that fear, doubt and regret become tangible.”

-Natalie

Good Grief: An Animated Short Film by Fiona Dalwood

On September 16th, advice I had the privilege of going to Quickdraw Animation Society’s presentation of the Director’s cut of MIAF, the Melbourne International Animated FIlm Festival. Two hours worth of short films were selected by the director, Malcom Turner, from a variety of countries, differing animation styles, and a broad spectrum of subject matters.

Good Grief, was one of the Australian films selected by Turner, claymated by student Fiona Dalwood. The film deals with four stories of grievance told by five individuals, three adults and two children. The interviews were then animated by Dalwood into the personal stories of five characters, a bull terrier, a grass hopper, a spider, and two garden vegetables. The serious and deeply personal subject matter is treated with such delicacy, and presented in a very positive way. Dalwood aims to present the positive development of grievance, and the transformative impact it has on an individual. She explores the universality of grievance, how it impacts everyone, and the way this experience is so personal and unique to each individual.

This film relates very directly to my practice. This understanding of grief and loss, and working with it in an acceptance, rather than a struggle. Loss is a strong force in all my work, and I feel that Dalwood’s treatment of the subject matter of Good Grief in a very playful, or childlike understanding is similar to my work Habitâmes.

I, like Fiona Dalwood, have reached an understanding that through loss and grief one gains a true understanding of life, and how to live it.

http://goodgrief.tv/

 

– Natalie

Stephen George Alexander Mueller | Starting Over

Stephen George Alexander Mueller’s Starting Over is currently exhibiting at the Untitled Art Society’s Satellite gallery. The opening reception was on Friday the 13th, stomach closing on October 19th, 2013.

Stephen G.A. Mueller, Starting Over.

Starting Over is a video installation of the documentation of a 55 hour, 16 minute, and 39 second long performance, in which Mueller plucked each individual beard hair from his face and placed it into a specimen jar. After each hair was plucked two remote-trigger cameras took photos of his face, one from the back, the other from the front. The photos are compiled into a time-lapse video of the performance, playing on a loop in the gallery. The front photos and the rear photos are projected on two suspended screens facing each other, while the specimen jar sits between them. The jar not only contains the preserved beard hairs, but also a small typed note reading, “I’m sorry I wasn’t there for you.”

Starting Over is a performance of both personal torture and personal cleansing. The act itself, 3 days of pain and exhaustion, allows time to reflect and reanalyze. As the artist writes in his statement, “through repetition of a cathartic act, fear and regret may prove themselves tangible.” In conjunction with the note, “I’m sorry I wasn’t there for you”, Mueller’s actions are directed at somebody, as if he is not only doing this for himself, but he is pulling his hair out in a form of punishment to appease somebody else.

Stephen G.A. Mueller, Starting Over, detail

Personally, the beard itself is what I find the most interesting. Hair grows like a personal history. it becomes encrusted with memories and experiences. The hair becomes a relic of the events it has been worn to, the places it has been, the people it has come in contact with. Mueller describes his relationship to hair,

“Human hair becomes a cemetery, filled with the living gravestones of our past relationships and experiences.” (UAS)

In the act of plucking his every hair, Mueller is cleansing himself. He is pulling away the past from it’s very root, deeply hidden within his skin. He is  beginning again, growing a new history from the extraction of his past. As he removes each hair and places it in a specimen jar, he is disconnecting himself from his past while preserving it and keep it safe. This serves as a reminder, one that he can chose when to revisit.


http://stephengamueller.com/

-Natalie

Tracey Emin: My Life In A Column

Tracey Emin, purchase a female mixed media artist from England, troche is best known for her large installation work from her early career. Her work Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-1995, hospital also known as “The Tent”, is arguably her most well-known work. Often misinterpreted as everyone she has ever had sex with, the work consists of a small blue, handmade tent, appliqued with 102 names of people Emin has slept with. First shown in 1995 in the South London Gallery, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-1995, became Emin’s breakout work, shocking viewers with her honesty. The cathartic nature of this work continues throughout her career. The tent itself was destroyed in a fire, along with many other contemporary artworks by Emin and others, in 2004.

Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-1995 Tracey Emin. 1995. Mixed media.

In 1996, Tracey Emin lived in a locked room in the Galleri Andreas Brändström in Stockholm, for fourteen days. She could be viewed from the outside through a series of wide-angle lenses embedded in the walls. Naked and alone, Emin worked continuously making paintings, drawings, body prints, and paintings on objects. The contents of the room were photographed and collected, and now exist as an installation work, Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made.

Tracey Emin is a personal idol of mine. I am drawn to her poetically brutal honesty, and her intensely personal subject matter. I admire her ability to make such intimately personal subject matter accessible and powerful to a broad audience. Her ability to remain interesting also intrigues me. Emin’s practice deals with her life and concepts so personal, as she describes ” they touch her” (BBC HARDtalk 2012). Naturally, as the subject matter is her life, it changes as she does. Though she continues to use similar subject matter, she addresses it in new ways. As she matures and gains new knowledge, perspective and understanding, her work matures in unison.

Installation view. She Lay Down Deep Beneath The Sea. Tracey Emin. Turner Gallery. 2012

Image from her 2012 exhibition, She Lay Down Deep Beneath The Sea, at the Turner Gallery in England. Addressing similar themes of heartbreak and loneliness, but from a mature, less brutal, perspective and representation.

From 2005 to 2009 Emin wrote  a weekly column for The Independent Newspaper in London. The column itself is like reading a private diary of her life, dealing with the themes behind her work, process, inspirations, and various exhibitions. It also touches her very private thoughts, exposing her feelings and her insecurities, while also voicing her profound observations of daily life. Every edition of Emin’s column has been compiled and published in a book, Tracey Emin: My Life in a Column.

Throughout this summer I have been reading her columns, gaining insight on daily life, and feeling like Tracey Emin is a personal friend of mine. Her life is both tragic and beautiful. Her every success has come from such incredible sacrifice. Even in her times of joy, success and celebration, it is all seen through the self-medicating/self-harming eyes of alcohol abuse. Each column flips from stories of joy, love, friendship, success and happiness, to those of heartbreak, betrayal, bitterness, loneliness and isolation. While reading her diary-like columns of her life so different than mine, I cannot help but find parallels.

Even at our saddest times – moments of anger – we mustn’t judge. We must always have the ability to see past the obvious. Maybe not question others, but look at ourselves. – Tracey Emin. 9 December 2005. The Independent.

Tracey Emin: My Life In A Column

Works Consulted

Emin, Tracey, interviewed. “Tracey Emin Coming Home.” Pres. Stephen Sackur. BBC HARDtalk. BBC: 29 May 2012. Television.

Emin, Tracey. Tracey Emin: My Life In A Column. New York: Rizzoli International Publications Inc., 2011. Print.

Saatchi Gallery, . “Tracey Emin Exhibited at the Saatchi Gallery.” Saatchi Gallery Artist Profiles. (2013): n. page. Web.

 

-Natalie