Idea Exchange

I stumbled upon this organization called Idea Exchange while researching Canadian art galleries.  What’s unique about Idea Exchange is that they have a database of their fibre arts collection, tadalafil which can be accessed online:

https://ideaexchange.org/art/fibre-art-collection

You can browse the collection by region, price type, this site materials, techniques and date, allowing you to find artists and work that may be similar to your own practice. For example, I input a search for Type: Sculpture and Material: Steel Wire and discovered the work of artist Arounna Khounnoraj. Give it a try and see what you find!

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Arouanna Khounnoraj, Untitled Dwelling Series #1, 1998

-Madison

Image courtesy the website

For The Love of Tennis: Alternative Fibre

First, hemorrhoids a history lesson: Tennis was derived from from a sport called “real tennis” or “royal tennis”.  The ball can bounce off the walls, double bounce on either side of the net and generally, has a laundry list of complicated rules that I can’t even name.  It can still be played on 43 surviving courts around the world, however, the majority of tennis players around the globe have decided to move on to our modern version of tennis.

The main difference between the two versions of tennis that I am interested in is the tennis ball.  Unlike todays modern, hollow, yellow felt balls, the sport of real tennis plays with a denser, usually white ball. This real tennis ball is handmade.  The core is cork and is then wrapped in a fabric tape.  The ball is then covered with melton cloth and stitched closed.

Upon acquiring a real tennis ball, I decided to take it apart.  Below is an image of my woven work: linen warp and real tennis ball fabric tape weft.

real tennis

 

-Madison

New Maps of Paradise: Eric + Mia

New Maps of Paradise, recipe currently on display at the Nickle Arts Museum at the University of Calgary features the work of artists Eric Moschopedis and Mia Rushton.  Both artists are Calgary based and the work is focused on community based social projects that the two artists have performed collaboratively since 2007.  Moschopedis comes from a theatre background, while Rushton is focused on a craft based practice.

There is a strong presence of textiles present within the show, including the work titled because even under the cover of darkness we are haunted by the past.  This work is an ongoing quilting project that began in 2012.  The artists conducted ten-question interviews with people they were familiar with.  After the interviews, the artists would choose a phrase that they felt represented the interviewee and imagined that phrase in the form of a quilt.

cover of darkness

Another textile work in the show is we knew the future/before disappearing all together.  This work consists of four quilted banners, spelling out the title of the work on either side of four panels.  This piece represents and celebrates youthful hope, demise and the collectivity of the art community.  From one side of the gallery you can read the words, we knew the future, while from the other side of the gallery you can read, before disappearing all together.

Diana Sherlock’s curatorial ability to translate this performative work into a museum display was due to her borrowing cultural geography and ethnological display techniques.  The work requires the viewer to engage and read the accompanying text.  However, the viewer is rewarded with a clear and deep understanding of the meaning of the work upon doing so.

Running until April 2nd, Eric and Mia: New Maps of Paradise is a strong representation of craft, community and the city of Calgary as a whole.

(image courtesy the artists website: http://www.ericandmia.ca/#/because-even-under-the-cover-of-darkness-we-are-haunted-by-the-past/)

 

-Madison

Gather and Be Alone Together Closing Reception

As I continue my colour research I must acknowledge the artists who work with the absence of colour. Two artists I have been looking at are Maximilian Schubert and Piero Manzoni, what is ed who have a very similar aesthetic.

Schubert is an American artist working with materials towards a minimalist end result. One series of his  imagines “painting-as-object”, anabolics mixing sculpture and painting elements into one. The pieces are done in an all white palette which are then left titled Untitled. Another series inspired by drawing, treat uses brass to create sculptural or 3D drawings. Information on him and his art is limited on line, while lots of images are available.

Schubert 1Schubert 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Format #14- #16, 2013. Brass.

Untitled, 2013. Cast acrylic polyurethane, epoxy, fibreglass, acrylic and vinyl paint.

Manzoni was an Italian artist living from 1933-1963. He is the artist we all know as the guy who canned his own feces and sold it as art. However, what I am interested in is his sculptural, monochromatic paintings. Similar to Schubert’s pieces, Manzoni drew his inspiration from questioning traditional artistic practices, experimenting with new materials and really playing into conceptual art.

W1siZiIsIjE1MDk0OSJdLFsicCIsImNvbnZlcnQiLCItcmVzaXplIDEyODB4MTI4MFx1MDAzRSJdXQ          W1siZiIsIjcwNjIxIl0sWyJwIiwiY29udmVydCIsIi1yZXNpemUgMTI4MHgxMjgwXHUwMDNFIl1d

Achrome, 1960. Kaolin on canvas.

Achrome, 1962. Fibreglass on velvet-covered wood.

 

See Schubert’s work and writing on it here:

http://www.mutualart.com/Exhibitions/Maximilian-Schubert/3AC64AE484AAC775#Info

https://www.artsy.net/artist/maximilian-schubert/works

 

See Manzoni’s work and writing on it here:

http://www.moma.org/collection/artists/3741?=undefined&page=1

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/piero-manzoni-1571

 

-Emily
Please join us on Thursday, physician
January 21 from 5 to 7PM at John Fluevog Calgary (207 8 Ave SW) for the closing reception of Gather and Be Alone Together.

This group exhibition features the work of seven fibre artists from Alberta College of Art + Design. Gather and Be Alone Together explores the community of craft and the solitude of creation. The works show a wide range of fibre techniques including weaving, surgeon
embroidery, infection
knitting and cloth dyeing. Many of the works exemplify the importance of the hand-made and explore the significance of this in today’s society. Works in the show present us with quiet reflections of the artist’s meditations and hold the memories of their process in the creation of the work.

The show takes its name from a quote by Ann Hamilton, a contemporary artist who draws inspiration from one of the most well known textile artists in history, Anni Albers. A nod to both past and present, you are invited to Gather and Be Alone Together.

 

Showcard Front

 

Visiting Artist: Rowland Ricketts

Fibre Fortnight is coming up next semester, approved so I thought I would share the work of Rowland Ricketts, our visiting artist this year.

Ricketts trained in Japan, learning how to farm and dye with indigo.  His work uses traditional techniques and natural processes to create woven and dyed works of art.  Ricketts also creates large installation pieces, working with the gallery space to create an environment for the viewer.

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I am Ai, We are Ai – Warehouse Installation, Japan, 2012

Rickett’s artist statement begins beautifully with an explination of his process and feelings towards his materials.  He states, “The smell of an indigo vat just as it begins fermenting and springs to life is one of ripeness; a moment of rich potentiality when, as a maker, I momentarily stand between the history of the materials and processes that helped me get the indigo thus far and the promise of all the works that the vat is still yet to realize.”  

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Past Present, Ohio, 2010

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Red Aligned and Centered, Yellow

Rowland Ricketts will be showing his work at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Oregon from January 29, 2016 until June 04, 2016.  That means that if we go on our grad trip to Portland, a wide range of his work will be available for us to view.

All images were taken from Rickett’s website: http://www.rickettsindigo.com/

-Madison

 

Fibre Majors: Call for Submissions

 

Have you ever read Selvedge Magazine? The school library has a subscription and I highly recommend checking it out. A friend of mine got me a digital subscription for my birthday. It is a beautiful publication full of some of my favourite things: textiles in fashion, fine art, interiors, travel and shopping.

I read a really great article in issue 59 this morning written by Kim Werker called: Ugly on Purpose, which also appears in the book Craftivism: The Art of Craft & Activism by Betsy Greer. In the article she discusses overcoming your fear of failure by making something ugly. She came up with the project “Mighty Ugly” when she was faced with the challenge of making a doll. She decided to alleviate her fear of screwing up by intentionally making the doll ugly. This was a profound experience, liberating her from the pressure she put on her self to make things perfect.

ugly doll

From here, her project flourished. She held workshops and invited people to make ugly dolls with her. They would discuss the ugly voices that we all to listen to saying: “You can’t do it” “It’s not worth trying” and “Nobody will care anyways…”

ugly1

 

ugly2

By listening to that voice and letting it convince you not to make something or not to speak out is doing yourself a disservice. “If there’s even a small chance our creations or conversations will make someone smile or raise someone’s consciousness or inspire reflection, that’s reason enough to create or converse.”

Kim Werker now has a book on her project as well as a website: http://www.mightyugly.com/

I really enjoyed reading this piece, it has a lot of parallels to my ideas and work with stains on cloth. Making something ugly is really the beginning of something beautiful 🙂

-Carly

 
 

The Fibre Department is now accepting submissions for our annual show at the Peanut Gallery at John Fluevog Calgary.  The show will run from December 14th until January 30th and is open exclusively to fibre majors.  Submissions must be in by Tuesday, medicine
December 1st
, online
no later than 12:00PM.

Submissions can be emailed to: madisoncpotter@gmail.com. Within the body of your email, Hemorrhoids
please include:

  1. Your name and year of study
  2. Contact information (non-ACAD email if necessary)

Attach to email in PDF form:

  1. A statement (maximum 300 words) that describes the work you are submitting and a brief explanation of your practice as an artist
  2. A point form description of the work that includes:
    1. Title of the work
    2. Materials
    3. Dimensions
    4. Installation requirements
  3. Digital images of your work (minimum 2)
    1. Must be jpeg files
    2. Images must be properly lit and in focus
    3. Please make your images 150 dpi and 1200 pixels along the longest side
    4. If your work requires video or sound please submit electronic files

Please make sure all attached files are in PDF form. The Peanut Gallery does not provide plinths, so please consider work that can be installed without the use of a plinth. The date of installation for the show will be on December 13, 2015 and artists must be available to install their work on that day between 12-5.

If you have any questions about the submission process prior to the deadline, please feel free to contact Madison Potter at madisoncpotter@gmail.com

-Madison

Interiors, Other Chambers: The Collections of Celia Perrin Sidarous

The Esker Foundation (arguably the best gallery in the city) is currently displaying works by two artists in the main gallery space.  The show that struck me the most was Celia Perrin Sidarous, psychiatrist as her work is all related to collection.  Perrin Sidarous is a collector, who documents her collections through still life photography.  The objects she chooses to photograph together create striking images.

These materials are brought together through an intuitive process; a new object or image is kept if it resonates or shares an affinity with other objects in the collection.” -Esker Foundation Website

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Exhibition View, 2015 (image courtesy the Esker foundation website)

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Folding Fan, hands, Venus, geode and hairstyle, detail, 2015 (image courtesy the Esker foundation website)

Make sure to check out the Esker Foundation’s exhibition of Celia Perrin Sidarous’ work, Interiors, Other Chambers.  The exhibition runs until December 20th.

-Madison

Picasso Made a Lot of Sculptures

Featuring more than 100 sculptures, recuperation Picasso Sculptures, erectile is currently on display at the MoMa in New York City until February 7, syphilis 2016.  I flew through the exhibition in twenty minutes because of time restrictions, but all of the work looked truly spectacular in person.  The highlight was definitely Picasso’s Guitar sculpture, which he made in Paris in 1912.  It’s also the only work we managed to take a picture of… but shout out to Art History 101 for introducing me to the importance of this work.

picasso

-Madison

Sheila Hicks

Textiles in a Hungarian grandma's house. Photo: Heidi Friesen
Textile collection from a Hungarian grandma’s house. Photo: Heidi Friesen

In July I participated in an artist residency with D’CLINIC Studios in Zalaegerszeg, read more Hungary and Lendava, healing Slovenia. I had the opportunity to see some amazing traditional domestic textiles, order and even learn a few embroidery techniques. I also found some old linen remnants at the Zalaegerszeg market, and they are now serving as the foundation for some embroidery experiments of my own.

Photos: Heidi Friesen
Some of my recent work. Photos: Heidi Friesen

Continue reading “Sheila Hicks”

Uncommon Threads: Habu

Though I have many artists who I look up to, buy viagra
Ann Hamilton stands firmly as one of the most inspirational. Ann is a widely recognized artist for her large-scale multi media installations. She received her BFA in textile design from the University of Kansas in 1979, and went on to complete her MFA in sculpture from the Yale School of Art in 1985. Ann’s work has a continuous element of delicacy and an ethereal quality that I am inherently drawn to. Her work has a tendency to be meditative, which I believe may be the root of why she stands as a strong figure in my artistic practice.

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com
Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

The Event of a Thread is a well-known exhibition that took place in New York. I have chosen to speak specifically to this work simply because it is the most applicable to my practice at this time. In this work, the space is transformed by a massive piece of cloth which is connected to swings throughout the space. When used, the swings cause the cloth to raise and lower with the movement. This piece is an effective example of reforming a space so that it is re-considered by the audience. Although Hamilton has the resources for work of this scale, the conceptual backbone of the viewer’s experience is what remains inspirational to my practice.

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com
Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

 

You can view an Art21 video on The Event of a Thread here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fJ4umqXGjM

And visit Ann’s website and read a beautiful statement on The Event of a Thread here: http://www.annhamiltonstudio.com/projects/armory.html

 

-Marcia
Though I have many artists who I look up to, viagra
Ann Hamilton stands firmly as one of the most inspirational. Ann is a widely recognized artist for her large-scale multi media installations. She received her BFA in textile design from the University of Kansas in 1979, healing
and went on to complete her MFA in sculpture from the Yale School of Art in 1985. Ann’s work has a continuous element of delicacy and an ethereal quality that I am inherently drawn to. Her work has a tendency to be meditative, which I believe may be the root of why she stands as a strong figure in my artistic practice.

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com
Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

The Event of a Thread is a well-known exhibition that took place in New York. I have chosen to speak specifically to this work simply because it is the most applicable to my practice at this time. In this work, the space is transformed by a massive piece of cloth which is connected to swings throughout the space. When used, the swings cause the cloth to raise and lower with the movement. This piece is an effective example of reforming a space so that it is re-considered by the audience. Although Hamilton has the resources for work of this scale, the conceptual backbone of the viewer’s experience is what remains inspirational to my practice.

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com
Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

 

You can view an Art21 video on The Event of a Thread here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fJ4umqXGjM

And visit Ann’s website and read a beautiful statement on The Event of a Thread here: http://www.annhamiltonstudio.com/projects/armory.html

 

-Marcia

 

 

 

 

 
Though I have many artists who I look up to, generic
Ann Hamilton stands firmly as one of the most inspirational. Ann is a widely recognized artist for her large-scale multi media installations. She received her BFA in textile design from the University of Kansas in 1979, sales and went on to complete her MFA in sculpture from the Yale School of Art in 1985. Ann’s work has a continuous element of delicacy and an ethereal quality that I am inherently drawn to. Her work has a tendency to be meditative, which I believe may be the root of why she stands as a strong figure in my artistic practice.

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com
Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

The Event of a Thread is a well-known exhibition that took place in New York. I have chosen to speak specifically to this work simply because it is the most applicable to my practice at this time. In this work, the space is transformed by a massive piece of cloth which is connected to swings throughout the space. When used, the swings cause the cloth to raise and lower with the movement. This piece is an effective example of reforming a space so that it is re-considered by the audience. Although Hamilton has the resources for work of this scale, the conceptual backbone of the viewer’s experience is what remains inspirational to my practice.

Source: annhamiltonstudio.com
Source: annhamiltonstudio.com

 

You can view an Art21 video on The Event of a Thread here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fJ4umqXGjM

And visit Ann’s website and read a beautiful statement on The Event of a Thread here: http://www.annhamiltonstudio.com/projects/armory.html

 

-Marcia

 

 

 

 

 
My practice has always been directed towards the incorporation of different materials in weaving.  For the last year I have been using metal in combination with different types of silk to create textured weavings.  While often difficult to use, see
the results have been worth the learning curve of using an incredibly weak material.  I source my metal threads from Habu, a Japanese supplier based out of Colorado (http://habutextiles.com/).  Habu offers novelty yarns, as well as a wide variety of metal threads.

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Aside from providing these uncommon materials, Habu also sells knitting patterns that show you how to create wearable garments out of the metal fibres.

kit-77_1kit-24_1kit-78_1kit-73_1

In Calgary, Pudding Yarn (1516 6 St SW) offers a small selection of Habu threads.  Otherwise, the materials are easy to order online and always arrive quickly.  Habu is my go to, so check out the awesome and uncommon fibres they have to offer.

-Madison

Girl Crush: Roanna Wells

One of my favourite fibre artist’s of all time is Roanna Wells.  I stumbled upon her work on instagram and immediately fell in love.  She embroiders black thread onto cream coloured wool to represent an overhead view of crowd formations at various events throughout history.  She calls this body of work Interpersonal Spatial Arrangements.  Wells describes this work by saying, pillInterpersonal Spatial Arrangements look at the way in which we, viagra as a human species, have the power to express common thought, opinion and appreciation through the act of coming together to form crowds”.  You can find more of her work on her website, http://www.roannawells.co.uk/

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Le Tour de France, 2014

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World Youth Day, 2011

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Diamond Jubilee Celebrations, 2014

-Madison

The Curator’s Handbook: A Review

Stepping away from the process of making art and creating a career in the arts, buy viagra I have been investigating curatorial studies. The most valuable resource I have found is Adrian George’s, check The Curator’s Handbook.  The Curator’s Handbook acts as a textbook detailing the steps of becoming a curator and pursuing a career in curatorial studies. George explains everything from budgeting to publications to installation processes. Working for the UK Government Art Collection as the Deputy Director and Senior Curator, ailment Adrian George speaks on years of experience, making The Curator’s Handbook a necessary resource for aspiring curators. This book acts as a point of reference in my curatorial research and would be beneficial for every fine arts student to read because of the detailed look into putting a show together, writing proposals, marketing and many other aspects of a career in the arts.

images

-Madison

An Interview with Emily Ferguson

Emily Ferguson is a fourth year fibre major.  Her work this year has been focused on investigating colour and the hierarchy of materials.  She often works with linen, sildenafil silk and other natural fibres in her weaving and embroidery practice.  I’ve asked her a few questions about her work, process and influences.

What do you look at for inspiration for your work?

I often find inspiration through conversations with others. In class, with
strangers, coworkers or friends, I find ideas in others. Further outlets such as
books and the handy Internet are my main streams of stimulation. I believe
location and my general day-to-day surroundings are just as imperative to my
practice through my subconscious and conscious mind.

What is your creation process?

I think it is different for each piece. Generally, I begin with an idea. I run
that through my head and mind map it on paper until I can build on it or move
past it to a different, better idea. From here I choose colors and materials,
although there are certain materials I favor, such as linen. I then begin with
drawings to further my concepts, gather materials, and start the creation
process!

Can you name the artist’s that have influenced your practice the most and what
attracts you to their work?

There are two main artists that have influenced my practice this semester. Aly
barohn is a contemporary artist who works with embroidery. Her natural materials
and use of organic shapes as well as geometric shapes is what I am drawn to. She
is a major inspiration for my own embroidery practice.
Another artist, Gunta Stölzl, was a German textile artist whose work was very
colorful. Weaving and tapestry were the main techniques she employed and they
were often completed in abstract blocks of color. Though I tend to be drawn to
more subdued colors, her color combinations and blocking are what I am
interested in. Stölzl studied at the Bauhaus where she combined fine art
techniques with traditional textile practices, similar to my own practice
currently.

What would you say is the most valuable thing you have learned from your last
few years at the Alberta College of Art and Design?

If I had to pinpoint one specific valuable lesson I’ve learned, it would be
patience. I have always been a person who organizes my life through lists.
Crossing off a ‘to do’ from my lists becomes super satisfying, and the faster
the better. Three years at the Alberta College of Art and Design has brought me
new patience, especially being a textile major. Crafts such as embroidery or
weaving are lengthy and require patience. In my fourth year, I have finally
slowed down to enjoy the process of creating.

-Madison

Fibre Supply Resources

This semester I’ve tracked down two new resources online for ordering fibre supplies.

The first is called Paradise Fibres and is based out of Spokane, bronchi Washington.  I stumbled upon the store this summer on a trip and it is a spectacular warehouse of thousands of different materials and tools.  Bonus: Canadian’s save 10% off their orders! They supply everything from unspun wool, neurosurgeon to undyed yarns, more info to specialty brands such as Habu Textiles. Go check out the site: http://www.paradisefibers.com/

string1

The second supplier I have been ordering from is called String Harvest, based out of Gold Coast, Australia.  Their mission is to provide ethical, vintage and hard to find materials.  The stock online is constantly changing with new additions to the vintage section and is exciting to browse.  I have purchased yarn made out of paper by a company called Paperphine from the website and the shipping cost was only $14!! Shipping to Canada is usually supposed to take around five weeks, however my package took eight weeks to arrive, so plan ahead.  Go check out the site: http://stringharvest.com.au/

string2

Photos are both from the String Harvest instagram account @stringharvest.  Happy shopping!

-Madison