Congratulations Christine Thomson

For this English class with Derek I have really being trying to push my poetry within my practice. I have been trying to make successful artwork that integrates my poetry with my hand drawn imagery. Derek has shown us so many great examples of Canadian poetry in this course that is contemporary and different than any poetry I had read before. It pushed me to re-think my own writing process and think about what I would like the reader of my poetry to understand. I have been juxtaposing my poetry with my simple hand drawn images of banal everyday objects that are not normally important objects to remember. I try to sift through my memories and pull out the fragmented pieces within my writing of an experience that is now broken. I also want my hand drawn imagery to be pathetic and feel like although these objects are banal that they are still important and can reference people, health care places and time.

Both of these pieces seen above are in response to books of poetry that Derek showed to us in his course. Boat Ride is in response to the book Testament by Dennis Lee which is about the apocalypse. For this artwork I wanted to explore a time in my childhood when I felt like I was going to die on a boat ride I went on when I was about 3. My own personal apocalypse. We were at my family cabin and decided to go boating on the lake nearby and we had way too many people in our boat. I remember vividly being forced to go on the boat even though I didn’t want to because my parents weren’t going to be on the boat with me. Eventually . . . the boat started to fill up with water and then we were all in the middle of the lake with floatation devices waiting for another boat to rescue us and take us back to shore. Although it sounds like I remember a lot from this time all of this is somewhat fragmented and I only remember bits and pieces of it. I wanted to capture my feelings in this memory with my poetry and juxtapose it with an image of a boat key.

My second piece Garage Light was in response to a book called Decomp by Stephen Collis and Jordan Scott which is about letting Darwin’s book about evolution decay in nature and what the authors were left with to create poetry from. They both wanted nature to read the 5 books they left in different climates all over British Columbia. After reading this book I had thoughts about my interest in objects decaying and falling apart. I’ve always been a big fan of rusting and rust dyeing so I thought it would be a good time to bring this interest back into my practice. Garage Light is about the house I grew up in when I was a child and how it is very much so falling apart and decomposing. My parents did a lot of renovations on this house that we no longer live in and when I go back to visit it many of these past renovations are still there. I thought it would be interesting to put together an image of our garage light falling apart and rusting with poetry from what I remember most while my parents were going through renovations. This was mostly my brother and I getting told off for doing something we weren’t supposed to be doing at the time.

Titling my artwork has been another important aspect to my work lately because I feel that if I am not choosing the right titles people will not understand why the writing and the imagery go together. I am still trying to fine tune this body of work and will continue to do so throughout my time in Derek’s class.

 

-Vaughan McMillan
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Recent Fibre graduate Christine Thomson has won the American Tapestry Alliance Award. Congratulations Christine!

Since 2011 there have been three winners of the ATA award from ACAD including Christine, melanoma
Sabrina Niebler and Rachel Betts-Wilmott.

Amazing moms of Sunnyside School: Part 2) Janine Vangool

In Part 2 of my “Amazing moms of Sunnyside” I had the privilege of speaking with Janine Vangool, somnology ACAD 1995 Graduate  of Visual Communications.  Janine is the publisher, editor and designer of UPPERCASE magazine. Janine began Uppercase in 2006 as a gallery and paper goods store. Inspired by design, illustration, typography and craft.

1) Reflecting back, what would you consider was your “big break” to realizing the creation of UPPERCASE?

There wasn’t any one thing that I would consider a “big break”. I firmly believe that you make your own “luck” through hard work, learning, and doing. When I first began UPPERCASE as a store selling paper goods, I imagined someday that I would publish, so it took four years to lay the groundwork of experience before the first issue was published.

2)How has running a magazine shaped your creative process & approach to your work?

Running the magazine and all the various tasks from subscription management and logistics to marketing to editorial and design, is all part of my day-today. The magazine and the books that I produce are my creative outlet (with designing them being the icing on the cake), but the process to create such things is not really creative: it requires planning and strategy and extreme organization since I have to accomplish so much on my own with a set quarterly publishing schedule. So I suppose the nature of a magazine requires such a process.

3) If you could go back in time and give your younger self some advice, what would it be?

I’ve always been very determined to do what I like doing. I had a “real” job for about nine months after graduating from the Alberta College of Art and quickly realized that being one’s own boss would be a far better way of life. So I’ve always been self-sufficient, relying on my own abilities and drive to support myself financially in my early twenties. So that early introduction to being in business for myself paved the way for my future entrepreneurial adventures. I wouldn’t change anything about it.

To learn more about Janine and her magazine I’ve provided a link to her website UPPERCASE  or go to www.uppercasemagazine.com. And don’t forget to subscribe!

Karin McGinn

Stay Tuned for our final, Amazing moms of Sunnyside School: Part 3)  Sarah Nordean, talented artist and painter.

Fibre Alumni Exhibition

Miyake was born 22 April 1938 in Hiroshima, bulimics Japan. He studied graphic design at the Tama Art University in Tokyo, graduating in 1964. After graduation, he worked in Paris and New York City.

Returning to Tokyo in 1970, he founded the Miyake Design Studio, a high-end producer of women’s fashion.  There is the link about issey Miyake Fall-winter fashion show.

The opening of the  show is fantastic. I think that the music is classic Japanese rhyme. He like use unusual material to design the garments at the opening of the show.

issey miyake Fall-winter 2014/15 womenswear fashion show

The following image is about his spring collection 2014.

The dress cutting is quite simple but the color can catch people’s eyes. It is a bright idea to make the  from white to colorful then colorful to white.

It like a review for viewers.

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-yuanyuan Ping

alumni-poster

The ACAD Fibre Program is pleased to announce a new pop up gallery. The National Gallery of Contemporary Fibre Art will feature work from students, urologist
alumni and even objects from historical textile collections. Please join us on Thursday September 25th at 5pm for a welcome back potluck and reception for our current exhibition of twenty three Fibre Alumni including:

Jolie Bird, pilule
Heather Bloxham, cost
Un-Jin Cho, Morgan Free, Suzen Green, Anu Guha-Thakirta, Jasmine Herron, Lindsay Joy, Jane Kidd (honorary), Amanda Kriaski, Julie Morstad, Bill Morton, Andrew Penner, Sheena Perratt, Ester Scott, Angela Silver, Marci Simkulet, Romy Straathof, Shannon Stratton, Candice Tarnowski, Wendy Toogood, Melissa Wong and Stephanie Wong.

This inaugural exhibition showcases a cross section of traditional and experimental fibre techniques dating back to the 1960’s. All pieces are on loan from the private collections of the Fibre Program faculty and will be on display until September 30th.

ACAD FIbre at Maker Faire this Saturday!

Hi everyone, info

Here is a sneak preview of some pictures from the Contextural Fibre Co-operative Groups Show currently being shown in the Marion Nicoll Gallery, physiotherapist Room 371 & the ACAD Storefront Jubilee Window. The opening reception is tonight from 6-8pm. 

This past June 2014 I participated in the residency program and here is what I found out about this Calgary based Fibre co-operative group. The Contextural Residency Program is a great meeting place for ACAD students to come together with ACAD Alumni, teachers and other like- minded artists. Residency members have the printing and the emulsion room for use , you also get a private studio area (hours are 7am-11pm).I did find that most people have differing schedules and it was quieter than I anticipated.

What I’ve enjoyed most about the residency program has been seeing the culmination of everyones work put into the Organic Matters Show. Its truly a great opportunity for students to participate in a show alongside some very talented artists. I almost have too many favourite pieces to mention, but I especially LOVED  Jolie Bird’s “Le pick- up” painting. Her mastery in combining painting with thread is superb and something that I’m striving for in my own work. Ginni Armitage’s “A Day Dream,” really did feel dreamy, she makes working with paper look easy.

I’ve added a link if anyone is interested about Contextural

I’ll see you tonight at the opening reception!

-Karin McGinn
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This Saturday, generic Jolie Bird and I will be at Maker Faire. We are excited to be representing ACAD at the event and will be sharing some methods for dyeing wool and cotton using plant dyes.

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Some of you may know that Jolie initiated the Fibre Dye Garden this summer growing sunflowers coreopsis, orthopedist
marigold, woad and rhubarb. Above are the woad leaves she harvested drying in the weaving studio. The dye garden is an exciting initiative that allows us to highlight the importance of sustainable practices in the Fibre studios at ACAD.

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Over the last few days Jolie and I have been preparing cloth and some yarns using various mordants including rhubarb leaves which release oxalic acid, a useful additive that tends to deepen the colour especially for yellows and reds.

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photo 1

Most plant dyes are adjective, meaning that a metallized salt or other substance is required to affix the colour. Some of the process can be done at room temperature but others require gentle simmering for a short period of time.

photo 2

With planning it is possible to use little to no energy in this process. We are currently researching other methods including solar dyeing.

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So if you are curious come down to Telus Spark and drop by our booth at Maker Faire anytime between 10 am and 6 pm. See you soon!

photo

– Mackenzie

ACAD Alum Brandy Wilson | Breath of the Land

 Breath of the Land - Poster 2 - Brandy Wilson 2014

A little background on Brandy Wilson’s upcoming show in Fort Smith.

So there we all were – cruising on the Blue Loo (named after the fact that the blue barge has an outhouse at the back)…it was cold, thumb windy and wet..but I could not have been happier. Every now and then I would feel a warm patch and I mentioned this to one of the other guests…he laughed it off…as in “yeah right!”…I then mentioned it to Page Burt, our guide and resident botanist, she told me they call it the breath of the land.

Bathurst Inlet is an isolated community in the high arctic of Nunavut – population 75 in the summer. Read more about Wilson’s show HERE

IMG_4220 8x10

Welcome back Fibre students…

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YOSHIKO IWAMOTO WADA is an artist, epidemic
author, curator, textile researcher and has long been an exponent of traditional and sustainable practices in fashion and textile production. She holds a BFA in Textile Art from Kyoto City Fine Arts University, MFA in Painting from University of Colorado, Boulder, and has studied Japanese silk embroidery, ikat weaving and indigo dyeing. She consults to designers including; Christina Kim of DOSA Inc., Los Angeles and Colleen Atwood for the movie ‘Memoirs of a Geisha’

The lecture will explore the complex strands and diverse approaches being taken by contemporary Japanese designers. With a focus on textiles and clothing, the selected case studies will highlight the extraordinary and innovative designs which seamlessly merge the boundaries between art and design; traditions and focus on textiles and clothing, the selected case studies will highlight their extraordinary and innovative designs which seamlessly merge the boundaries between art and design; traditional and technology; and makers and market.

Case studies include:  Issey Miyake, Tokyo; Jurgen Lehl of Tokyo; sou sou in Kyoto, Christina Kim of dosa inc in L.A., Organic Cotton/ Appachi in India; Arimatsu/Narumi shibori center and Suzuan e.K. in Germany.

Lecture:
Tuesday August 26, 2014.
7:00pm-9:30pm
Standford Perrot Theatre.

We have tickets to give away to the first 19 Fibre majors or Fibre Alumni that email, jolie.bird@acad.ca. Tickets will be available to pick up at the door prior to the lecture. To purchase tickets, please follow this link
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I hope everyone had a good break over the summer. I am excited to welcome everyone back to Fibre and hope that this year will be productive, emergency
inspiring and maybe even a little fun.

Our Studio Technician Jolie Bird is also getting organized to start the term and would like to hear from our majors. What are you making this year? What resources will you require? You are encouraged to drop by the fibre office or email her with questions (jolie.bird@acad.ca).

If you are experiencing any difficulty with registration or need assistance navigating your program, Fibre faculty are here to help – email me (mackenzie.frere@acad.ca) or Laura Vickerson (laura.vickerson@acad.ca) anytime.

WELCOME BACK!

-Mackenzie

 

Employment / Studio Opportunity

The Whitney Biennial may have been divided according to the inclinations of its three curators this year but on every floor there were hints of handicrafts from enormous samples of misshapen glazed pottery to cords of eye-poppingly colorful natural fibers suspended from the ceiling. -Rozalia Jovanovic

Sheila Hicks
Hello ACAD community!

My name is Jolie, surgeon
I am filing in for Tara Niscak, the beloved Fibre Technician while she is on maternity leave.

I wanted to share an exciting new project I am starting here in May. Some of you may know the Fibre department has a big, beautiful patio off room 415, this summer we are going to start a garden growing natural dye plants for our department. As this is a pilot project we will start by growing everything in containers in order to be cost effective and flexible with the space.

A few years ago I read about SAIT’s culinary garden and thought what a great idea it was. I liked the way the garden moves the classroom outside while physically connecting the students to their food and therefore creating a better understanding of what they are eating and serving to their patrons. My hope is by starting this garden our students will gain a better understanding of the materials they use. Working with natural dyes presents a wide and varied range of colours and possibilities. I hope our students will be encouraged to work in a more sustainable way choosing natural dyes over chemical dyes and will learn how easy it is to start their own gardens once they graduate.

In an effort to be environmentally conscious and cost effective I am looking for a few items you might have at home and no longer need. Please have a look through your garages and garden sheds and make a donation to the new Fibre department garden!

  • CLEAN 5 gallon pails
  • Large gardening pots
  • Watering can
  • Hand gardening tools
  • A rain barrel
  • Good quality, clean soil

In addition to these items, I would love to have help from anyone who wants to be involved, send me an email if you are interested in lending a hand. Jolie.bird@acad.ca

Article on SAIT’s culinary garden for your reading pleasure.

natural-dye1

The Textile Arts Center in Brooklyn has been doing this for a few years, have a look!

 
Colwyn and Nancy Wararuk are looking for individuals interested in working for their company West of the Fourth Weaving in Erskine Alberta. The successful candidate would have access to a loom for their own projects. Come see Mackenzie in the Fibre office for their contact onfo or use the email at the bottom of this post…

We would like someone who is motivated and energetic who is capable of doing repetitive tasks all day long, clinic
after all weaving is about repeating the same thing all day long and then repeating that the next day.  We want someone who wants to work in a production studio setting with the emphasis on the production of bulk yardage of fabric.  This person would also have access to our looms at any time during the summer.  Ideally we would like someone whose interest is in functional useable textiles and not just art for the wall.

We operate Monday to Friday from 7 am until 6 pm.  We can also run on the weekends too.  We would like someone to be able to work for 8 hours a day during these hours.  After these hours they would be able to have their own project loom and they would be responsible for their own material costs, of which we can provide.

Tasks required to be completed will include everything from making warp, dressing looms, and weaving.  The compensation is based on a per task basis not by the hour so a person can make as much as they want based on the time commitment and their aptitude.  However they do have to work in order to get paid.

We are looking for a person for the summer months.  Depending on the persons aptitude a reoccurring summer position would be available as well as ongoing employment.

Please have any interested student send the resume with three references to us at westofthefourthweaving@hotmail.ca.  We would be able to come to Calgary one afternoon in the next couple of weeks to meet with any interested students.  Thank you.

Colwyn and Nancy Warwaruk

ACAD Fibre Fortnight, Mini Silent Auction + Underwater Basket Weaving!

 

ACAD’s Fibre Program and the School of Craft + Emerging Media are pleased to present a series of events between March 11 and 20, sildenafil 2014 celebrating the talents of current students, phimosis alumni and faculty.

Fibre Fortnight Exhibition
This exhibition takes over the entire ACAD Main Mall and features student work at all levels across a variety of media including mixed media sculpture, surface design, weaving, video and more.

Miniature Silent Auction
Our yearly Fibre program fundraiser features small, collectible pieces donated by ACAD students, alumni, faculty and staff. Bidding is ongoing and will close March 20 at 6 pm. Funds raised support Fibre’s visiting artist program, student initiated projects and the Fibre graduating class. So bid early and bid often. 

Closing Reception + Alumni Panel
Finally, please join us from 5 to 9 pm for the Closing Reception for both exhibitions in the ACAD main mall (3rd floor); and a special alumni panel discussion hosted by the School of Craft + Emerging Media. Underwater Basket Weaving: Risk, Entrepreneurship and Strategies for Success will engage six ACAD alumni in conversation around their successes and overall experiences as entrepreneurs in a range of creative industries. Confirmed alumni panelists are:

Mackenzie Kelly-Frère, Associate Chair, School of Craft + Emerging Media (and ACAD Fibre alumnus) will facilitate the discussion. The panel starts at 7 pm in the Stanford Perrot Lecture Theatre.

All are welcome and this event is open to the public.  We look forward to seeing you there!

Mackenzie Kelly-Frère | Frequency

It is indeed that time – time to bring it all together and sift through what one has gathered from the term ( and terms that led into this past one). I decided to take some classes outside my major to further my practical knowledge and hopefully open up my mind to processes that could inform my work. Taking Printmaking with Gary Olson and Drawing with Miruna Dragan were two extremely wise decisions – perhaps not for my time management of the term but certainly to grow and push some boundaries.

Miruna’s class allowed for some huge learning curves ( animation, salve wall drawings, look
automatic drawing, and pushing personal potential). We were encouraged to bring our own practices into class, but also to explore other avenues into resolving class assignments. The small weavings pictured below I named “KOAN” as they were part of the drawings from the subconscious that we did for our first project, and were a kind of secret statement from me to me.  I rolled the images wet, and wove them into triangular wall hangings on the Archie Brennan pipe loom.They are rolled little secrets, that project out from the wall, guarding their thoughts.

"Koan", Paper, bamboo, cotton twine ikat dyed.
“Koan”, Paper, bamboo, cotton twine ikat dyed.

 

The large wall drawing was a project that entailed a student to draw, exhibit and then paint over their image in three days. My painting ( as pictured below) is a topographical map of a female body. The female body has often been used as a metaphor for the earth: as Gaia, as Mother Earth. The Spanish and the French use the feminine to describe the earth ( la tierra, la terre).It has been a body to be conquered, both literally and figuratively. I am interested in the environment and what we as human doings have done to her.  I loved the huge canvas of the wall, and am saddened when I consider how long a tapestry would take to cover the same territory. My experiment with female topography has led into other work.

 

"Topography of Her", Acrylic paint, charcoal.
“Topography of Her”, Acrylic paint, charcoal.
Detail, "Topography of Her".
Detail, “Topography of Her”.

DETAIL UPPER TORSO

In my print making class I am experimenting with linocut prints, and am cutting some sample imagery for my next tapestries. I am considering a series of local inappropriately named mountains to draw attention to the fact that it is time to rename and reconsider the history that allows for these mountains to continue to be listed on maps by their colloquial terms.

 

Lino cut for tapestry image
Lino cut for tapestry image

Here is the cut plate of a local mountain that may be used for my next tapestry series. I will start printing those tomorrow. I still have a couple of days left to get some stuff done, right?

 

-Christine Thomson
 

As a few of you may already know, unhealthy
I will be spending June, illness
July and August of 2014 on residency at the Icelandic Textile Centre in Blönduòs, site Iceland. The residency is uniquely for textile artists, and I highly recommend all of you apply. Facilities include:

Weaving Rooms: They have looms of two differents sizes: 80 and 140cm. They are 4, 6 or 8 shafts Counter-balanced. Residents have full access to weaving equipment: large selection of reeds, warping reel, distaff holders, shuttles, yarn reels etc.

Dyeing Rooms: It is a full scale natural dyeing room.  Provided with a small movable oven, dyeing tools, the same large sink and a drying space which is well divided. Iceland produces is known for its various dyestuffs, such as lychens of various colors, plants and flowers.

The Summer Festival is what I will be there for, and what I am most interested in. Summer Festival is where the artists of the residency, and surrounding area, make large scale (and small scale) outdoor installation works to celebrate the season, daylight and community. Expressing the passing of time, the changing of seasons, and the interaction between peoples through outdoor installation. I want to be part of this festival for the rest of my life, this is what I live for.

Here is a quote from the  2013 Summer Festival at the Textílsetúr Island Icelandic Textile Centre:

We are gleaners.

Our language relies on materiality;
Rusted industrial scraps, seaweed, wool, old sheets, jumpsuits;
Borrowed and re-interpreted milliner techniques.
We’re discovering points of reflection that hint towards metaphysical meaning.
Some say there is an inherent biological tendency for equilibrium.
One is to leave a skin of time, their pieces of vulnerability stripped by weathering and human treatments.

We are what we touch- smell, see, hear, taste.

There is a clarity, a peacefulness on the mountain, it effects your whole being. We become this mountain, this stillness, this landscape.
The elements vibrate through us, her wind rippling taut green strings on rusted forms.
A wave of modulation surfs until it breaks, and all you see is a framed landscape – the sun atop the ocean.

2013 Summer Festival

This is where I am meant to be.

Here is the link the website where you can find out more about the residency, and more about how to apply.

http://textilsetur.com/home-page/

-Natalie
 

As a few of you may already know, herpes
I will be spending June, July and August of 2014 on residency at the Icelandic Textile Centre in Blönduòs, Iceland. The residency is uniquely for textile artists, and I highly recommend all of you apply. Facilities include:

Weaving Rooms: They have looms of two differents sizes: 80 and 140cm. They are 4, 6 or 8 shafts Counter-balanced. Residents have full access to weaving equipment: large selection of reeds, warping reel, distaff holders, shuttles, yarn reels etc.

Dyeing Rooms: It is a full scale natural dyeing room.  Provided with a small movable oven, dyeing tools, the same large sink and a drying space which is well divided. Iceland produces is known for its various dyestuffs, such as lychens of various colors, plants and flowers.

The Summer Festival is what I will be there for, and what I am most interested in. Summer Festival is where the artists of the residency, and surrounding area, make large scale (and small scale) outdoor installation works to celebrate the season, daylight and community. Expressing the passing of time, the changing of seasons, and the interaction between peoples through outdoor installation. I want to be part of this festival for the rest of my life, this is what I live for.

Here is a quote from the  2013 Summer Festival at the Textílsetúr Island Icelandic Textile Centre:

We are gleaners.

Our language relies on materiality;
Rusted industrial scraps, seaweed, wool, old sheets, jumpsuits;
Borrowed and re-interpreted milliner techniques.
We’re discovering points of reflection that hint towards metaphysical meaning.
Some say there is an inherent biological tendency for equilibrium.
One is to leave a skin of time, their pieces of vulnerability stripped by weathering and human treatments.

We are what we touch- smell, see, hear, taste.

There is a clarity, a peacefulness on the mountain, it effects your whole being. We become this mountain, this stillness, this landscape.
The elements vibrate through us, her wind rippling taut green strings on rusted forms.
A wave of modulation surfs until it breaks, and all you see is a framed landscape – the sun atop the ocean.

2013 Summer Festival

This is where I am meant to be.

Here is the link the website where you can find out more about the residency, and more about how to apply.

http://textilsetur.com/home-page/

-Natalie
In a little over six weeks I will be travelling to Japan to install my first solo exhibition in Kyoto. Frequency runs at GalleryGallery from February 22 to March 8, nurse
2014. I will post more about the work in the exhibition soon but for now here is the promotional postcard designed by James Jensen of Atom Graphics. (Thank you sir.)

MackenzieFrere-GGE-invite-2014-01

MackenzieFrere-GGE-invite-2014-02

Job Opportunity

Farewell Grandpa
Farewell Grandpa

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This is another decoration that commemorates my grandfather who passed away. I sewed twelve jade in a circle around his portrait as a depiction of protecting him from bad spirits. It is believed that the North American Indians used the idea of laying stones in a circle for honoring and protecting the nature and human beings. It is identified as the medicine wheel. I wanted to incorporate Western and Eastern culture to my work in order to memorialize my grandfather in a unique way. The jade that I used originally belonged to my grandfather. Collecting jade was his favorite hobby and he had hundreds of jade collection. He often gave jade to my mother because he believed she wore it nicely. He considered jade as a special stone that not many people could carry it well. After he passed away, my mother has been wearing the jade necklace he got for her because this precious gift makes her feel like he will always be by her side when she wears it. I mimicked his handkerchief because in my Chinese culture the meaning of gift-giving handkerchiefs indicates saying goodbye to someone. I wanted to use this idea as a representation of saying a proper goodbye to him since I regretted that I could not attend to his funeral. The frame is suspended in a diamond shape because it symbolizes peace which came from the design of one of the Chinese red paper banners they hang on the wall during Chinese New Year. My aim of this project was to capture the image of my grandfather in the most intimate way in order to show how much my family and I missed him. I believed embroidery was the most suitable technique for representing my concept.

Wendy

Hello Fibre Folks, tuberculosis

The following job opportunity has just been posted to the ACAD website…

We have a new career posting on our website:

·         Educational Art Technician, healing
Fibre (Temporary)

To view and/or to apply, ask
please follow the link below.

https://acad-openhire.silkroad.com/epostings/index.cfm?version=1&company_id=30044.

If you do not see the position listed, in the filter by category selection box, select “all categories” and then click on the perform search button.

Should you have any questions about applying, please feel free to contact me at  403.284.7616 kristopher.bonnett@acad.ca or Susan Veenhoven at 403.284.7683 or susan.veenhoven@acad.ca

Obviously this posting is not for current ACAD students, but many of our fantastic alumni read the Fibre blog. Please forward as appropriate. Thanks!

HEARD•NY | Nick Cave

ok i shall try to put to words (in more point form because its easier) the things i am thinking about with my crochet objects before i present on Wednesday.

crocheting is something done with rhythm, physician same as knitting. things that also have (or commonly do have in variation) rhythm are; breathing, disease
your heart beat, moon cycles and nature with seasons. this expands to growth and decay, things begin and things end. cycles are also comforting, and relayed upon. rhythm is comforting. community is comforting and also keeps loneliness and isolation at bay. culturally individualism makes us lonely because we consider ourselves singular entities, rather than as apart of a something bigger. this is also considered a western idea. (*video worth watching added below*)

http://vimeo.com/70534716

how do we relate to the self and to others? objects as stand in for people for example because they can be sources of sentiment. sentiment: “exaggerated and self-indulgent feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia.” this exists and multiple forms and exists in childhood toys for example. in this piece i am attempting to convey a intimacy with objects of rhythm, sentiment and comfort. i want to have a sound recording of a heartbeat playing in the background of this piece in hopes it will relate more to a level of human connection. if a heart beat is heard in a closed room i want it to relate to being in a womb. a safe and natural environment.

2013-11-30 12.29.57

i am using a round chair that will be covered with both the objects i made and an assortment of stuff animals. (i will not be offended if anyone wishes to sit.)  there is more in regards to the crochet objects because they act as containers. “containers are receptive; they establish a transition between interior and exterior.” (object theory by paul mathieu). to me these objects have meaning that i am not sure is really important to the piece but they are filled with material that are without purpose, and projects i have not finished.

well then, i hope this works

Zoe

 

 
ok i shall try to put to words (in more point form because its easier and feels the most honest) the things i am thinking about with my crochet objects before i present on Wednesday.

crocheting is something done with rhythm, abortion
same as knitting. things that also have (or commonly do have in variation) rhythm are; breathing, buy viagra
your heart beat, moon cycles and nature with seasons. this expands to growth and decay, things begin and things end. cycles are also comforting, and relayed upon. rhythm is comforting. community is comforting and also keeps loneliness and isolation at bay. culturally individualism makes us lonely because we consider ourselves singular entities, rather than as apart of a something bigger. this is also considered a western idea. (*video worth watching added below*)

http://vimeo.com/70534716

how do we relate to the self and to others? objects as stand in for people for example because they can be sources of sentiment. sentiment: “exaggerated and self-indulgent feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia.” this exists and multiple forms and exists in childhood toys for example. in this piece i am attempting to convey a intimacy with objects of rhythm, sentiment and comfort. i want to have a sound recording of a heartbeat playing in the background of this piece in hopes it will relate more to a level of human connection. if a heart beat is heard in a closed room i want it to relate to being in a womb. a safe and natural environment.

2013-11-30 12.29.57

i am using a round chair that will be covered with both the objects i made and an assortment of stuff animals. (i will not be offended if anyone wishes to sit.)  there is more in regards to the crochet objects because they act as containers. “containers are receptive; they establish a transition between interior and exterior.” (object theory by paul mathieu). to me these objects have meaning that i am not sure is really important to the piece but they are filled with material that are without purpose, and projects i have not finished.

well then, i hope this works

Zoe

 

 
ok i shall try to put to words (in more point form because its easier and feels the most honest) the things i am thinking about with my crochet objects before i present on Wednesday.

crocheting is something done with rhythm, remedy
same as knitting. things that also have (or commonly do have in variation) rhythm are; breathing, malady
your heart beat, and moon cycles and nature with seasons. this expands to growth and decay, things begin and things end. cycles are also comforting, and relayed upon. rhythm is comforting. community is comforting and also keeps loneliness and isolation at bay. culturally individualism makes us lonely because we consider ourselves singular entities, rather than as apart of a something bigger. this is also considered a western idea. (*video worth watching added below*)

http://vimeo.com/70534716

how do we relate to the self and to others? objects as stand in for people for example because they can be sources of sentiment. sentiment: “exaggerated and self-indulgent feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia.” this exists and multiple forms and exists in childhood toys for example. in this piece i am attempting to convey a intimacy with objects of rhythm, sentiment and comfort. i want to have a sound recording of a heartbeat playing in the background of this piece in hopes it will relate more to a level of human connection. if a heart beat is heard in a closed room i want it to relate to being in a womb. a safe and natural environment.

2013-11-30 12.29.57

i am using a round chair that will be covered with both the objects i made and an assortment of stuff animals. (i will not be offended if anyone wishes to sit.)  there is more in regards to the crochet objects because they act as containers. “containers are receptive; they establish a transition between interior and exterior.”  mathieu). to me these objects have meaning that i am not sure is really important to the piece but they are filled with material that are without purpose, and projects i have not finished.

Mathieu, Paul. “Object Theory.” Utopic Impulses: Contemporary Ceramics Practice. Eds. Chambers, Ruth, Amy Gogarty & Mirelle Perron. Vancouver: Ronsdale Press, 2007. pgs. 111-127print

well then, i hope this works

Zoe

 

 

 
ok i shall try to put to words (in more point form because its easier and feels the most honest) the things i am thinking about with my crochet objects before i present on Wednesday.

crocheting is something done with rhythm, unhealthy same as knitting. things that also have (or commonly do have in variation) rhythm are; breathing, your heart beat, moon cycles and nature with seasons. this expands to growth and decay, things begin and things end. cycles are also comforting, and relayed upon. rhythm is comforting. community is comforting and also keeps loneliness and isolation at bay. culturally individualism makes us lonely because we consider ourselves singular entities, rather than as apart of a something bigger. this is also considered a western idea. (*video worth watching added below*)

http://vimeo.com/70534716

how do we relate to the self and to others? objects as stand in for people for example because they can be sources of sentiment. sentiment: “exaggerated and self-indulgent feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia.” this exists and multiple forms and exists in childhood toys for example. in this piece i am attempting to convey a intimacy with objects of rhythm, sentiment and comfort. i want to have a sound recording of a heartbeat playing in the background of this piece in hopes it will relate more to a level of human connection. if a heart beat is heard in a closed room i want it to relate to being in a womb. a safe and natural environment.

2013-11-30 12.29.57

i am using a round chair that will be covered with both the objects i made and an assortment of stuff animals. (i will not be offended if anyone wishes to sit.)  there is more in regards to the crochet objects because they act as containers. “containers are receptive; they establish a transition between interior and exterior.”  (Mathieu 116). to me these objects have meaning that i am not sure is really important to the piece but they are filled with material that are without purpose, and projects i have not finished.

Mathieu, Paul. “Object Theory.” Utopic Impulses: Contemporary Ceramics Practice. Eds. Chambers, Ruth, Amy Gogarty & Mirelle Perron. Vancouver: Ronsdale Press, 2007. pgs. 111-127print

well then, i hope this works

Zoe

 

 

 

 

For HEARD•NY, anemia
Chicago-based artist Nick Cave transformed Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall with a herd of thirty colorful life-size horses that broke into choreographed movement—or “crossings”— twice a day, there
accompanied by live music. The project was presented by Creative Time and MTA Arts for Transit as part of a series of events celebrating the centennial of Grand Central. We are thrilled to have partnered with The Ailey School, approved
whose students performed the crossings, and with Chicago-based choreographer William Gill, who worked with the artist to design the dancers’ movements. We are also delighted that harpists Shelley Burgon and Mary Lattimore, and percussionists Robert Levin and Junior Wedderburn provided the musical accompaniment.

via HEARD•NY | Creative Time.

Summer Employment Opportunity

The Lion Cushion
The Lion Cushion

information pills ‘serif'”>The Lion Cushion is a “valuable” decoration to me because not only it symbolizes the importance of my heritage, but also shows an important history of Calgary. In my culture, the lion expresses happiness and joy. The Chinese perform a lion dance for special occasions such as business openings, religious rites, and consecration of temples. On the other hand, the lion emphasizes who I am now as a Canadian as well. The city committee in Calgary has decided that three historic lions that once stood on the Centre Street Bridge will soon sit along the West LRT line. These lions, worth millions of dollars, were built in 1916 but were removed from the bridge and replaced by replicas during refurbishment in 1999. Since then, one of the lions has been installed at City Hall and the rest remain in storage. The meaning behind the lion is so precious that I believe the technique of hand-sewing is the best way to interpret this message.

I had no knowledge of what traditional Chinese embroidery looks like. Hence, I decided to find an image of a lion on the internet and interpret the way I felt the embroidery should look. Instead of embroidering the whole lion using threads, I chose to use beads as the body to represent its movement and how lifelike and shiny it could be. Time management is another key when working on embroidery because it takes about half an hour just to sew a small part. I also find that embroidery is quite unexpected; you have to decide whether you want to continue to layer one part or go to the next section.

Details of the lion's face
Details of the lion’s face
Details of the lion's body
Details of the lion’s body

Wendy

 
West of the Fourth Weaving Studio is looking for weavers this summer.

Visit their website to learn a little more about the studio and contact Corwyn Warwaruk directly for more details.

As with any opportunity, gonorrhea
it is advised that you inform yourself before accepting any contract for employment.

-Mackenzie