Miniature Show auction item by ACAD Alumni Sarah Nordean

Sarah Nordean is an ACAD Alumni and recent graduate of Emily Carr’s MAA program.  Presently Sarah is part of a group exhibition at The Stride Gallery Could it be, malady We’ve Surpassed Material Expectation  on at Stride’s main space until April 3rd 2015.  Sarah has generously created and donated Composition #2  for the Fibre departments upcoming Miniature Show Auction. We know, this we’ve got great friends! Thank you Sarah!

Composition #2, <a href=
medic 2015 Sarah Nordean” width=”442″ height=”443″ /> Composition #2, 2015 Sarah Nordean

 In concept, format, and process, my art practice is an exploration of rhythm and its relationships with ritual, time, and place. I look beyond spectacle toward the rhythm of seemingly mundane or insignificant actions and ways of making art using repetition and serialization, repetitive mark-making, everyday sounds, and simple materials. My work builds up over time through cumulative gestures and considers ideas of labour, obsession and futility. I attempt to echo the relentless nature of everyday life as a way to showcase simplicity, to highlight small differences, and to acknowledge the inevitable complexities. -Sarah Nordean

www.sarahnordean.com

Karin McGinn

Miniature Show funds visiting artists like Ruth Cuthand

 

 

Recently, herbal our Fibre department invited artist Ruth Cuthand to teach a beading workshop to the students of ACAD. Ruth Cuthand is a First Nations artist who uses her ancestors traditional beading methods as her medium. Ruth Cuthand’s Dis-ease series is currently on display at The Illingworth Kerr Gallery in Oh, Canada: Contemporary Art from North North America. In Dis-ease, the artist masterfully renders microscopic diseases;  diseases like small pox, syphilis and influenza were unknown to the indigenous people of Canada prior to colonialism.  Ruth Cuthand’s work addresses complex social and political issues affected by First Nations people.

Currently, I’m investigating experimental narratives through combined mixed media pieces. This piece was inspired by the stories (lies) we tell our children. The beading was extremely time consuming and after completing this project I can say I have a new appreciation for Ruth Cuthand’s beaded works! CAP(tain) Tooth will be auctioned off during our upcoming Miniature Show Auction (March 24 to April 9th). Last night to bid is April 9th!

 

CAP(tain) Tooth, 2015 By Karin McGinn

www.karinmcginn.com

TRACES + PROCESS CLOSING RECEPTION JANUARY 28TH, 5-7PM

Hi everyone, tablets

Please join us next Wednesday for the closing reception of  Traces + Process on Steven Avenue at the Fluevog peanut gallery from 5-7. Representing the Fibre department are Jolie Bird, help Sandrine Weltzin, Vaughan McMillan and Karin McGinn.

fluevog_poster_final

Students in ACAD’s School of Craft + Emerging Media present an exhibition of fibre, video, jewellery, painting, animation, and ceramics. In these works, notions of process reveal themselves as gestural traces in their various materials. With works by: Pamma FitzGerald, Katie Holden, Eric Makwich, Levi Mayerle, Karin McGinn, Vaughan McMillan, Kaylee Novakovski, Jennifer Scheirer, Malcom Stielow, and Sandrine Weltzin.

https://www.facebook.com/events/330204887185193/

Hope to see you there!

Karin McGinn

 

Self portraiture in four parts

“Since the tubes of paint used by the artist are manufactured and ready made products we must conclude that all the paintings in the world are ‘ready-mades aided’ and also works of assemblage.”

-Marcel Duchamp

Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014

Duchamp’s philosophy on ready-mades provides an appealing thought process and one in which I could relate to my materials also. Oftentimes during the process of art making, decease it seems that I’m not creating something from scratch; rather it is a method of assemblage. Textile material, especially cloth is a semi-ready art piece, arriving in my hand already containing a multitude of interesting textures and shapes. These materials already have a language, and speak of human production, domesticity, the feminine, the familiar and mundane; all of these attributes could be read from cloth before I even initiate my own mark making art process.

In my work titled “Self portraiture in four parts”, I’ve imagined this series as a collaboration with my materials. I wanted to describe my process as an artist and also communicate my love of textiles. My materials used often initiate inspiration involved in the making process and impact my artistic approach. This piece is a self portraiture in four parts. Each piece connects an idea within the larger biographical context. By doing this I was able to express several ideas regarding my connection to my materials.

Sub-title "Dream" of Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014
Sub-title “Dream” of Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014

 Beginning with the pieces on the left, the sub-title for this one is “Dream.” I imagined myself in the conception stage of my creative process. I’ve drawn my feet up in a relaxed position alone daydreaming about making art. I’ve drawn and collaged this image using cloth scrapes found in my studio box. The cloud formations points to an ethereal state of mind.

Sub-title "Breath" of Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014
Sub-title “Breath” of Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014

 Next is “Breath” detailing an anatomically correct lung to symbolize a romantic notion regarding being an artist, as in the air I breathe. As an artist I gravitate towards technically difficult imagery, depicting organs using thread and cloth requires a task using concentration that I find satisfying.

Sub-title "Makers materials" of Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014
Sub-title “Makers materials” of Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014

The third piece is sub-titled “A makers material” and is a self-portrait of my hand dangling some thread in the air. This piece emphasis’s a direct link to the material and myself, a collaborative process.

Sub-title "Brain" of Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014
Sub-title “Brain” of Self portraiture in four parts Karin McGinn 2014

On the far right is the last piece sub-titled “Brain”, hand drawn using a wood burner onto cherry wood. The brain is of course the engine that we use to perform our human functions. Replicating human organs also ties into a necessitate to ponder human attributes. Again, using technically difficult imagery allows for a skilled technical hand. Drawing on wood is a current exploratory investigation of combining differing materials into my textile practice.

-Karin McGinn

www.karinmcginn.com

Unplug me

IMG_1471

This work is named “cat” because I wanted to print a lot of cats’ heads on clothes. I chose a more formal dress, Breast
and then I chose cute cat patterns to print on the dress’s front and back. I chose to print cats on the dress because I wanted to combine of formal and casual elements. It is kind of fun. I printed the cute cat pattern in black and crimson to emphasize the style of the dress. Too much color would not work. On the back of the dress, I printed a series of cats in action. One is sitting, one is jumping, and the last one looks at the viewer. There are series of lovely patterns on the back. In the selection of jewelry for the dress, I chose to needle -felt a necklace. Colored balls hang in front of the dress like cat toys, which added a little playfulness.

Yuanyuan Ping

The Canadian Crafts Federation in partnership with the PEI Crafts Council hosted the 3rd Annual National Craft Symposium, remedy titled “Heirloom”. Part of the PEI2014 cultural celebrations, the Symposium featured speakers from the craft field discussing the merits, the history, and the contemporary aspects of heirloom objects. This talk features our special guest speaker, Jane Kidd, a tapestry artist and retired arts educator now living on Salt Spring island in British Columbia.

The Canadian Crafts Federation in partnership with the PEI Crafts Council hosted the 3rd Annual National Craft Symposium, pharm
titled “Heirloom”. Part of the PEI2014 cultural celebrations, the Symposium featured speakers from the craft field discussing the merits, the history, and the contemporary aspects of heirloom objects. This talk features our special guest speaker, Jane Kidd, a tapestry artist and retired arts educator now living on Salt Spring island in British Columbia.

A continuation from my nine “Burn drawings”, healthful
my piece titled “Unplug me” investigates a challenge of process by combining juxtaposing materials together.

"Unplug me" Karin McGinn 2014
“Unplug me” Karin McGinn 2014

 

I’m interested in the beauty of everyday objects in our material culture. We interpret these objects and in a sense communicate with them through our relation/usage of them. This thought was in the foreground during the making of my piece titled “Unplug me.” I used the functionality of the plug to mimic my own longing to detach from the responsibilities of my life.

Positioned as a diptych, this piece embodies two individual identities, each holding their own space thereby communicating to each other that they are separate and differ in material and method of construction. The textile material allowed for physical holes, a play on negative space, and a story separate from the wooden block drawing. Although they both convey the idea of something burnt, the textile component instead expressed this idea through the malleability of cloth demonstrated in the holes of the fabric. Combining these two pieces has allowed for an interesting exploration between differing materials and their cause and effect, an ongoing investigative approach to my materials and how they impact my artistic direction during the making process.

An extension of myself illustrated through a material object. Amusingly, I envisioned a bumpy transition; it might have been too sudden, suggesting this idea through the charred up holes in the electric inspired decorative fabric. A lighthearted storyline seemed to suit this unusual way of merging materials.

Close up"Unplug me Karin McGinn 2014

-Karin McGinn

burn drawings

These Burn drawings were the result of a successful exploratory process into a new material and technique in which I burnt my drawings onto wood using a wood burning tool and then later finished with gouache paint.

They represent the first in a new series for me. The series stemmed from this new found enjoyment and wanting to implement it into my practice. As a textile artist, cialis it’s my natural inclination to combine it with textile materials.

In this first piece “Burn Drawings” I’m thinking about graphic/vintage/universal elements. It isn’t until the next piece that I will blog about later where I attempt to combine wood and cloth together. An interesting experiment, cheap allowing for exploration between differing materials and their cause and effect.

"Burn drawings" Karin McGinn 2014
“Burn drawings” Karin McGinn 2014

Reflecting upon my escapist’s attitude and clues to my self-soothing ways, viagra here these drawings came to me at the end of my third year in Art College. I was feeling tired and burnt out, the warm summer sunshine was beckoning me with its possibilities but unfortunately, the pile of work on my studio desk was stating otherwise. Feeling unmotivated, this piece narrates a yearning to escape the daily stress of deadlines and expectations.

In response to my pessimistic attitude, I created nine small-scale drawings on wood, each one drawn using a wood- burning implement. By using the wood burner, I was able to achieve an aesthetically pleasing dark shading effect. Burning wood also felt rebellious to me and was most likely motivated by my slacker state of mind and desire to do something adventurous. Similar to the pages in a storybook, each square image contains a separate graphic element that in turn informs the next picture. These graphic images are intended to be read together like a story. The nine (sized 5” x 5”) squares combined form a larger square formation (sized 20” x 20”) to be displayed on a wall.

Reminiscent of days gone by I’ve appropriated images from the past, an old rotary dial up phone and an old television set complete with the antenna to invoke a past memory or daydream. The pills and wine represent the vehicles used to time travel and escape the present moment.

-Karin McGinn

Amazing moms of Sunnyside school: Part 3) Sarah Nordean

In my final interview with the “amazing moms of Sunnyside, plague ”  I spoke with Sarah Nordean an ACAD 2009 graduate of painting. Sarah recently earned herself another milestone in her artistic endeavours by graduating from emily carr’s  MA program; Congratulations Sarah!

1) In your work Ticks, you record the amount of time that it took to complete, with textile materials there is also a laborious element that becomes part  of the narrative. Is this time spent with your material an important part of your process?
Although I do not usually make this known about the work, Ticks is a direct result of motherhood. I developed this project as a way of dealing with time constraints. As a loner, I am energized through time spent by myself. Before starting a family, I would spend hours at a time making art, thinking, and researching. I would often be in the studios at ACAD until closing. Now, as a mother of two young children, part of my art practice is dedicated to carving out moments of aloneness or focus, however short. These moments have become routinized and ritualized. The restrictions of daily life dictate the times that I may spend alone, and as such, I have come to live a somewhat regimented life. The very early morning before my family wakes, brief moments during the day, or the evenings when they go to sleep are the times when I walk, write, read and make art. These moments are not long, and because of this I have made a habit of taking and using every second that is available, and found ways to spend this time productively. Ticks shows how my practice has evolved to include ways of working that consider the allotment of time, and allows an immediate engagement with process, like turning a switch or pressing a button. On, then off.
 
I can imagine that some aspects of a fibre practice could work the same way, methods where it is possible to walk away and come back to the work without compromising it.
 
As far as the time spent with the material being an important part of the process. Absolutely. I wanted to repeat a tiny inconsequential mark over and over as a way to infuse it with a kind of generated importance. A boring mark using cheap ink on cheap paper – I am interested in what happens when the mundane is treated as monumental, and the ideas of rhythm, labour and obsession that are related to this. I definitely see a relationship with textile arts, and think my tick could be seen as a stitch.
 
I find the work of Jolie Bird to be so inspiring in this respect. I could stare at her wrapped objects forever imagining every turn of the thread. I also love Germaine Koh’s Knitwork that has been accumulating for the last 22 years!
 
2) Now that graduation is upon you, what are your future art plans?
Now I want to be an artist! Like a real one. I have just started calling myself one, and I almost don’t feel like an impostor when I say it. I have one kid in school and my youngest will be there soon, and I can’t wait to spend more time in my studio. I also would like to get an art related job, as being in the studio and only emerging to interact with children might make me a bit crazy. I really like to interact with other adults and occasionally wear pantyhose. I would love to work for an arts organization, a museum, an artist-run centre, or a college. I was a teacher in one of my previous lives, and I would really like to teach again in a post-secondary setting. I will need to strengthen my art practice before that happens, though. In the meantime, I am applying for everything.
3) If you could give your younger self some art advice, what would it be?
Maybe put in a minimal amount of effort in trying to get your artwork seen by people. Why not apply for something? Figure out what an artist needs to do.
Expose yourself to more CONTEMPORARY art, not just art history. (I think this would have made being a part of the art world seem like a possibility, something that people actually did)
Go to a dedicated art school like ACAD, and not to the art program in a larger university. (I have done both, and the experiences at ACAD and Emily Carr have been far superior to a large university program. In fact, I think this could have addressed the above two issues of knowing what an artist needs to do, and for it even to seem like a possibility.)
This is a tough one, but think about your concept as on the same level as your technique. It is not enough for me now to just make something pretty.
 And finally, make more and fail more. Failure has been such a key to any of the success (however minor) that I have experienced.
 (Of course, my younger self would never have listened to anyone giving her advice.
If you’d like to see more of this artists work I’ve provided a link to her website here SarahNordean
A special thank you again to Sarah, Janine and Laura for taking the time out of their very busy lives to patiently answer my questions. This has been a rewarding and inspiring experience.
-Karin McGinn

more UPPERCASE…

In my Art history  class, ailment I read the subversive stitch: embroidery and the making of the feminine. Let me think the have common western and eastern culture. download

      “A myth developed that the true artist must be a temperamental “genius”, a rebel, a bohemian – as exemplified in the career of a painter like Caravaggio – and this meant that women’s work was not taken seriously, because a bohemian lifestyle would have been deemed inappropriate for a woman” (Parker 99).

” The crafts have tended to benefit women artists, since women have always been closely involved with craft work. The development of abstract art in the twentieth-century owes something to women’s knowledge of the abstract patterns on textiles and embroidery. “(Chadwick 271)

” The modern art scene in China has grown tremendously along with the economic and social expansion. In the 21st century this is beginning to change, however artists continue to struggle with limitations. During these decades, superficial emancipation of women by the state and persistent patriarchal social ideals influenced the artwork of women, which was limited further by an art community that defined “women’s art” largely in terms that echoed traditional ideals of femininity, making it difficult for women to publicly move beyond these restrictions.” (30 Years in the Making.Par.3)

I think that works of art themselves have no gender.

 
download

 

In my Art history  class, order I read the subversive stitch: embroidery and the making of the feminine. Let me think the have common western and eastern culture.

      “A myth developed that the true artist must be a temperamental “genius”, ophthalmologist
a rebel, a bohemian – as exemplified in the career of a painter like Caravaggio – and this meant that women’s work was not taken seriously, because a bohemian lifestyle would have been deemed inappropriate for a woman” (Parker 99).

” The crafts have tended to benefit women artists, since women have always been closely involved with craft work. The development of abstract art in the twentieth-century owes something to women’s knowledge of the abstract patterns on textiles and embroidery. “(Chadwick 271)

” The modern art scene in China has grown tremendously along with the economic and social expansion. In the 21st century this is beginning to change, however artists continue to struggle with limitations. During these decades, superficial emancipation of women by the state and persistent patriarchal social ideals influenced the artwork of women, which was limited further by an art community that defined “women’s art” largely in terms that echoed traditional ideals of femininity, making it difficult for women to publicly move beyond these restrictions.” (30 Years in the Making.Par.3)

I think that works of art themselves have no gender.

 

By- yuanyuan Ping

 
Janine Vangool, erectile
creator of UPPERCASE magazine and ACAD Alumni.

UPPERCASE bizmama

Amazing moms of Sunnyside School: Part 1) Laura Sharp

In part one I interviewed Laura Sharp, asthma a  graduate of ACAD’s Ceramic’s program three questions about her life as an craft artist.

1) I remember last time we were talking about porcelain and you were explaining to me how much more expensive it was than the earthen clay to buy. Besides the way it looks, ampoule is there any other reason this is your chosen material?

Actually it is because of the way it looks. The porcelain I work with has a special translucency about it that I have based some of the main tenants of my aesthetic around.  It is difficult to work with and I have dreams of moving on to another kind of clay, diagnosis but it is a big time commitment to work through new clay bodies and glaze palettes.  Alas, the dream of every artist mom is having more time to work through so many more ideas.

 2) Now that you’re an established artist, do you feel that you benefit from this community (Market Collective & New Craft Coalition) of artists in a different way?

Absolutely, I do a lot of production and that makes one a little crazy as its working through very similar ideas over and over, I love to connect with a similar community who are facing the same challenges as I am, it makes me feel a little less crazy and encourages me to progress little by little still.

3) If you could give your younger self some art advice, what would it be?

I don’t know that I would give myself advice, I think working through the mysteries of not knowing what’s ahead or what is going to happen and committing to the intense internal drive, “motivation, passion?!? Whatever you want to call it”, anyhow cultivates a tension that is necessary and needed.  

 Thank you Laura! I’ve already placed my christmas order for some of Laura’s fantastic porcelain bug mugs, click onto her name below to find her website.

Laura Sharp

www.whiteowlceramicstudio.com

*Correction from the  previous entry, Laura Sharp is a founding member of the New Craft Coalition, shows regularly at Market Collective but didn’t initialize it. 

Karin McGinn

Stay Tuned for more Amazing moms of Sunnyside School: Part 2)  Janine Vangool, creator of UPPERCASE magazine.

Amazing moms of Sunnyside: Three local artists/designers share their success in the creative world

As a fibre student and mom of  three young boys, website I’m always interested in hearing how other artists with families navigate their careers in between children and time constraints. In this three part series, I’ve interviewed three ACAD Alumni who also happen to be parents at the same local school school that my children attend.

The artists/designers are Laura Sharp, Janine Vangool & Sarah Nordean. In each interview I’ll provide a snapshot into their individual creative practice, how they do it and what inspires them.

 

Laura Sharp ACAD Alumni 2006

The first artist I’ve interviewed is Laura Sharp, ACAD 2006 graduate of  Ceramics. Laura maintains a full-time studio out of her home. She’s also one of the founding members of Market Collective & Craft Coalition. 

Janine Vangool ACAD Alumni 1995

Next, I talk to Janine Vangool, an ACAD 1995 graduate of the Visual Communications. Janine is the Creator of  UPPERCASE magazine; a beautiful designed quarterly magazine for the creative and curious.

Sarah Nordean ACAD Alumni 2009
Sarah Nordean ACAD Alumni 2009

And finally, Sarah Nordean is slated to complete her Masters of Applied Arts program (MAA) this month from emily carr University of Art & Design. Previously, an ACAD 2009 graduate of Painting and before that Sarah completed her degree in Art Education from the University of Victoria (2000).

 

Stay Tuned!

Karin McGinn

The studio proposal

I’m entering my final 4th year as a Fibre major in the  BFA program; it’s an exciting time!  This week has found me translating my art day dreams into writings called “the studio proposal.” Simple enough in theory but after a few re-writes & serious self-doubt I needed some external inspiration.

Mackenzie  Kelly-Frère, about it my senior studio instructor gave our class this great article titled “Writings” by Agnes Martin. In the article Martin describes the insecurities an artist feels regarding his/her art work. She assures the reader that self-doubt is an essential part of the artists creative process. She further explains that by recognizing our “defeats” we’re more apt to remember those flickers of the unattainable perfection, website like this this is where inspiration comes in.

“To make works of art that stimulate sensibilities and renew moments of perfection an artist must recognize the works that illustrate his own moments of perfection.” (Agnes, pg. 69)

001. Blood Brothers, (2013) Hand embroidered and machine sewn, pieced cloth hanging, 4.5' x 3 x (2) (1)Blood Brothers| Detailed Image, (2013) Hand embroidered and machine sewn, pieced on cloth hanging, 3' x 4.5' x (2)

This article was useful as it directed me back to thinking logically regarding my studio work. The artistic process is then a marriage between both success and failure.  “Blood Brothers” (made in 2013, this work is my glimpse at everything aligning in my practice). Through this piece I was able to challenge myself technically, find my narrative voice & finally present an aesthetically pleasing art piece. I guess I have my formula, lets see if I can try again.

-Karin McGinn

Contextural Residency Show “Organic Matters” Opening Reception Tonight 6-8!

Hi everyone, information pills

Here is a sneak preview of some pictures from the Contextural Fibre Co-operative Groups Show currently being shown in the Marion Nicoll Gallery, viagra Room 371 & the ACAD Storefront Jubilee Window. The opening reception is tonight from 6-8pm. 

This past June 2014 I participated in the residency program and here is what I found out about this Calgary based Fibre co-operative group. The Contextural Residency Program is a great meeting place for ACAD students to come together with ACAD Alumni, teachers and other like- minded artists. Residency members have the printing and the emulsion room for use , you also get a private studio area (hours are 7am-11pm).I did find that most people have differing schedules and it was quieter than I anticipated.

What I’ve enjoyed most about the residency program has been seeing the culmination of everyones work put into the Organic Matters Show. Its truly a great opportunity for students to participate in a show alongside some very talented artists. I almost have too many favourite pieces to mention, but I especially LOVED  Jolie Bird’s “Le pick- up” painting. Her mastery in combining painting with thread is superb and something that I’m striving for in my own work. Ginni Armitage’s “A Day Dream,” really did feel dreamy, she makes working with paper look easy.

I’ve added a link if anyone is interested about Contextural

I’ll see you tonight at the opening reception!

-Karin McGinn